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    • Cranch, Mary Smith
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    • Adams, Abigail

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Documents filtered by: Author="Cranch, Mary Smith" AND Recipient="Adams, Abigail"
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I reciev’d a few days since your Letter of Sepr. 12th and yesterday that of october the 12th and thank you most sincerly for them both. Your account of Holland entertaind me much. You must have improv’d your time well to have visited so many places and notic’d so much. The fatigue was too great for you. It was this that made you sick. I was rejoic’d to find your dissorder whatever it was for...
I have been waiting till I am out of all patience to hear that you are returnd to England. One or two vessels have sail’d for London without taking Letters for you. I did not know they were going till it was too late to write. I sent you a hasty line by Mr. Charles Bulfinch which I hope you receiv’d and to tell you the truth I have written you two letters Since, which I thought proper to...
I had a mantua makaker & a Tailor last week which keept me so fully imploy’d that I had not time to write I receiv’d your kind Letter by the Post a thursday & rejoice that you have got into such good order so soon. I do not rise quite so early as you but I should if I could get all my folks to Bed in season you do well to devote so much of the day to riding I hope the difficulty the bad roads...
I am doom’d my dear Sister to be the messenger of death to you. I believe for five weeks past my Letters have convey’d you an account of the death of Some Freind or acquaintence & almost all of them Suddenly taken away the death of Sucky warner whos remains I yesterday Saw depositted by the Side of our dear Parents & much belov’d aunt. there to remain till the last trumpet Shall bid them...
I have sent one Letter on Board capt Cushing but it is so long since that unless I Write again you will not feel as if you had heard from me for a long time— Cousin JQA & Billy have been at home above a week. Cousin charles was here yesterday. he came to wait upon mrs Hilliard & Daughter— your Sons are all well We are busy prepairing for commencment for although we do so little by way of...
Accept my dear Sister a thousand thanks for your charming Journal, it is just Such an one as I wish’d, so particular that while reading it, I could not help fancying my self with you. We hoped as we had Such fine weather for six weeks after you Sail’d, that you would have had a quicker Passage than I find you had. You did not feel more joy when you set your feet upon the British Coast, than I...
There is another vessel up which will sail soon. What I may have omited by this I shall write by that. Our uncle Quincy was well a few hours since is glad to see his Friends but cannot be perswaided out. Cousin Cotton remains the same he was, Flying from spray to spray without determining Where to chuse his Partner. If his Father should marry as he will certainly do as soon as he can get time...
I wrote you last Sunday by Doctor Welsh & your son who were here & sent it to new-york where you now are I suppose. I hope you found the Letter when you arriv’d as your Sympathytick heart would be in some measure reliev’d by the favourable account I gave you of mr Cranchs Leg— since that time it has continu’d to descharge well the mortified parts have been seperateing from the sound flesh &...
How provoking it is to be told that a vessel is to sail next week with our Letters and then have it stay in the Harbour six Weeks. I thought till yesterday that Capn. Young was half way to London at least, and behold he will not leave Boston this week. The Letters will be so old, that they will lose much of their value, but tis no fault of mine. I have been waiting some time without writing...
I am quite discourag’d writing by the Post I know not if you have ever receiv’d one Letter Which I have sent by them I have sent two long ones the Last I put into the office a month ago last Saturday. I should have written oftener if I had not suspected that Letters directed to Mr Adams where taken out by somebody who had no right to them— I hope I am mistaken—but I cannot conceive why you...
As I was seting quite alone this evening somebody came in from Boston with a Hankerchief full of Letters from you my dear, dear Sister. The Girls are neither of them at home, but I have ventur’d to open their Pacquits also, and a hearty laugh I have had at the extravagant Figures you have sent. Yes my sister our Ladies are foolish enough to deserve some of the ridicule. Those unnatural...
I write now because I know how it feels to be disappointed not because I have any thing to communicate of importance. I receiv’d your kind Letter of the 13 th of this month what related to my dear Son has given me great pain tis no more than I have fear’d. but his Father Says if he can get over these difficulties he will be as cunning as the ——— he does not speak wicked words you know. my fear...
My dear sister will I am sure excuse me if I send her now but a short Letter—when she is inform’d that there is but one day between this & commencment & that I have but just hear’d that cap t. Folger will sail this week It is true we are doing but little but it makes us more work than Ten such entertainments at home. every thing is dress’d here, & to be cut cold at cambridge except Green Peas....
I this day receiv’d your kind Letter from Springfield. I Set you down in Brookfield in my mind that day however I think you did right to go on as fast as you could the President must want both you & mr Brisler & could I think you would have any rest after you arriv’d I should feel better about you. but I do hope you will not think of Staying thro the hot months your Life is of too much...
Captain Cushing arriv’d last Monday after a tedious Passage It was so long since I receiv’d any Letters from you that I began to be very impatient. Cousin JQA had one in the winter but I have only heard of it. he forgot that I should want to see it & so did not bring it with him this vacancy your sons are now all of them with me. cousin JQA return’d last evening from an excurtion. I perswaided...
Mr. Storer is arriv’d and I have got my Letter and am very sorry to hear you have been so sick. If I had receiv’d this Letter before those by Callahan I should have been very uneasey till I could have heard again. I Will hope you are by this time perfectly recover’d. You will see by mine of November 29th that our thoughts in September and October were imploy’d about the same melancholy...
I did not design to write another line till I could get my pen mendid but not a creature can I get to do it, and I am so affraid that Captain Lyde will sail without my Pacquit that I dare not venture to wait till the children come from college tomorrow. I hope to see the dear Boys, and if the ship should not go so soon as I expect I will write again. I shall certainly write by the way of New...
Mr. Tyler has this moment reciev’d a Letter from Cousin Nabby by Captn. Lyde. I hope there are some in Boston for me. I have not heard one word from you Since you left England. The time has appeard very long. The Scenes you are now ingag’d in are so very different from any of your former ones, that I fear you will not have so much time to devote to your Pen as your Friends could wish. I am all...
I do indeed rejoice with you all upon the happy event which took place in mr smiths Family before your arrival I hope my Neices health is perfectly restor’d that the young gentlemen are both very well—& that you may soon return accompany’d by Coll n. smith whom I wish much to see— you must not think of comeing in the stage. It would be highly improper upon every account— we receiv’d your...
I last week heard from all your sons they were well. After this you may read on calmly— We are all well excepting great colds & coughs. I think in this Letter I shall not have to mention the death of any new Friend many very many of my Letters have convey’d the sorrowful tydings of some dear Friend departed, & if you should live to return to us you will find vacancys which will draw Tears from...
I last week had to inform you of the Sudden death of my much value’d Freind Mrs Quincy I Now have to acquaint you that last Sunday afternoon in the midst of his Sermon Doctor Clark was struck with an apoplexy & fell down— after he was got into the carriage to be carry’d home he came a little to but Soon seem’d to fall asleep & into a Suoun out of which he never wak’d & ceas’d to breath about 3...
I write again my dear Sister because I know you love to hear from me, & not that I have any thing important to communicate I was disappointed by not having a line from you yesterday as you clos’d your last Letter of Feb. 1 d by Saying you had just receiv’d one from me which you Should reply to the next day I went to Boston a Friday with mr & mrs Black in their Sleigh & return’d with them the...
Mr Cranch has pack’d your things & sent them on Board Captain Barnard I hope they will go safe but since they were put on Board mr woodward has sent for the stone roler & says he lent it to mr Adams, that mr Borland sold it to him we sent him to the Doctor about it. If tis so I suppose it will be taken out—I told him you certainly suppos’d it purchase’d with the House or you would not have...
I went to Boston yesterday & had the mortification to find my Letters did not go by Barnard or Davis although they had been on Board each of them. they got to town just as the vessels were sailing. Knox the Pilot took them as he was going on Board, & promiss’d to deliver them to the captain, but forgot it So after wearing them in His Pockit four or five days he return’d them as dirty as I...
I thank you for your Letter from worcester since that I have heard by the papers you have arriv’d in new-york. I hope Safe. you must have had bad weather some part of the way if Such as we had reach’d you. last Sunday evening we had a terrible Tempest of thunder Lightning & wind & rain the Lightning struck the house of cap n. J o. Baxter & every person in it reciev’d a Shock there were many...
The Day—the mighty Day is over, & our Sons have perform’d their Parts—& receiv’d the Honour of the college in a manner which will do them credit while they Live— never did you see two Happier Faces than theirs when they return’d from meeting— I do not believe they will ever feel so happy again— If to excell where all did well—can give pleasure your Son must feel a peculiar one. He has a...
The vacancys of our Sons always produces a hurry in our business & although we endeavour to keep every thing in good order for them from week to week—yet when they come home they have many wants which we could not foresee— we have sent your two youngest Sons in good health & good repair to college & are now fixing your eldest for Newbury & our own for Boston Cousin Tom has made a visit to...
I write my dear Sister with a hope that this letter will not find you in Philadelphia but as we have not heard that congress have risen I would not have you without a line of information that we are all well & that your chambers are ready the mason has promis’d to white wash the house & mrs Porter is waiting for orders to clean for your reception I have been fearful for your health & that of...
I have been waiting with impatience to hear of your arrival in Philedelphia, your health was so poor that I want to know how your Journey affected you, I hope you have found an advantage from it, but the fatigues attending moving are not very pleasing to the Body or Mind. If there could be any advantage arising from it to you, there would be something to balance the trouble, but to be at such...
Your kind letter I receiv’d to day and am greatly rejoiced to hear you are all so well. I was very uneasy at not hearing from you, indeed my dear Sister the Winter never seem’d so tedious to me in the World. I daily count the days between this and the time I may probably see you. I could never feel so comfortable as I at present do, if I thought I should spend another Winter here. Indeed my...