You
have
selected

  • Recipient

    • Adams, Abigail Smith

Author

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 10 / Top 50

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Recipient="Adams, Abigail Smith"
Results 1-50 of 620 sorted by relevance
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
I received yesterday your letter and package by Capt. White, and have received the account of the last resolution of the house to disband the army. I think the jacobins have now reason to exult, at out-manœuvering the federalists, as it appears they do upon every occasion. The federalists deserve every thing that will happen to them for their apathy. The next thing I expect to hear is that...
Our city has sustained a very great loss in the death of Dr. Bailey. As health officer, he was obliged to reside upon Staten Island, to which the sick from the vessels that came in were carried, and the hospitals have been crowded all summer with the Irish emigrants; he has taken the fever from them, and was only ill four or five days. He has not left his equal as a physician most certainly in...
I received yours of the 11th, this morning, by Mrs. Smith, who was so good as to stop and see me, though only a few moments, as the stage could not wait. I asked them to have breakfast or spend the day. As soon as I receive your letter, informing me when you will be at Brunswick, Colonel Smith and myself will go there, and meet you, and escort you here, where I hope you will spend Sunday. We...
Your two letters of November I have received, and am rejoiced to find that you recover strength. I have suffered a great deal of anxiety of mind upon account of your indisposition. At times I feel as if I could fly almost to see you, and be with you. When I lose you, this world will appear to me a desert. I do not complain, but my mind has suffered much; perhaps I am too prone to anticipate...
Received of Abigail Adams in trust for my sister Abbe A Shaw thirty four dollars, which with three dollars 50 cents, paid by mrs Adams to mrs Foster, is in full for a quarters Rent of the Medford Farm, due in April MHi : Adams Papers.
Receiv’d of Mrs Adams one hundred dollars in Payment for a Portrait painted by me MHi : Adams Papers.
I have had the Honor to receive your Letter of the 28th ult. covering one to your Son the American Minister at St Petersburg. I fear it will be too late for the “Hornet” sloop of war: but I have had it put under cover to Mr Barlow and sent to the Collector of the Customs at Newyork, requesting him to forward it by the first safe conveyance With great Respect / I have the Honor to be / Madam /...
I will thank you to tell Mrs. Cranch to give George a couple of teaspoonfuls of Castor oil and to give continue the black powders about three weeks longer repeating the dose of Castor oil at the end of six days Kiss them both for me and believe me dear Madam / your affectionate MHi : Adams Papers.
Accept the thanks of a heart opprest with sorrow but greatfull for your friendly sympathising letter. To that almighty power who alone can heal the wounds he inflicts I look for consolation and fortitude May you long very long enjoy the happiness you now possess and never know affliction like mine With prayers for your happiness / I remain your sincear / Friend NNPM .
Cloathing purchased for George and John Adams 3 peices Blew Nankeen at 2 dollars pr piece 6 1 peice yellow 1 25 2 yd Gingham .63 1 yd vesting 1 42 4 yds check 1 69 5 doz pearl Buttons 1 50 3 yd cotton Cloth 75
After a passage of fifty days from Cowes, we have this day landed from the Ship Washington; all well—We shall stay here only so long as may be indispensable for landing our baggage, and making other necessary arrangements. In the course of a week or ten days, I hope to enjoy the happiness of seeing once more, my dear father and you—Remaining in the meantime, ever affectionately your’s. MHi :...
Le Commandr. de Maisonneuve a l’honneur d’annoncer à Madame Adams qu’elle est inviteé au Bal de Sa Majesté l’Impératrice Mère, demain 13. Janvier, à 7. heures du soir. Il saisit cette occasion de présenter à Madame Adams l’hommage de son profond respect. MHi : Adams Papers.
R. Rush has the honor to present his most respectful compliments to Mrs Adams, and to thank her for the favor she was pleased to grant him of reading the enclosed letter from Mr J. Q. Adams, as well as for the kind postscript which conveyed the permission. To himself and Mrs Rush it has afforded equal pleasure, and such as the productions of Mr A’s pen, on whatever subjects, never fail to...
J. May’s most respectfull compliments to Mrs: Adams, and renders the enclosed, agreably to her request. Although the high honour, and happiness confered on him, by the confidence of Mrs: Adams, is infinitely above any pecuniary compensation; yet, in obedience to her request, he is obliged to submit an account; which, with deference, he hopes will be satisfactory to her. He begs to assure Mrs:...
I was honored with your note, & have attended to it as I hope is in accordance to your will on the subject. I have suffered several times by such mistakes as are noticed in my printed reply; & the opportunity to vindicate myself was so happily presented that justice seemed to require that I should not pass it over. I disavow all connection with the party business of the past or present—&...
The President yesterday received a letter from Mr Adams, in which he mentions his acceptance of his late appointment, and that he expected to embark in the course of the present month. The letter is dated on the 19th of April. In the possible event of this information not having reached you by the same vessel, I hasten to communicate it, offering my renewed congratulations to yourself and Mr...
Being informed of your intention to stop in this Town on your way to the Southward, you will give great pleasure to Mrs. Marshall and my self by accepting a bed at our house, as we can accommodate you with convenience, & perhaps more agreeably than at a public house; and depending on the honor of seeing you / I am / Madam / Your most humble Sert MHi : Adams Papers.
I am sorry my dear Madam to be under the necessity of communicating melancholly tidings to you, but I am requested by my dear & affected aunt to inform you of the sudden death of her truly estimable husband—he died this morning at 11 o clock after a confinement of eleven days—aunt discovers that fortitude & christian resignation which you would expect from her—his funeral will probably be...
It was with regret, that I left Boston without seeing you again, but we were in such a state of uncertainty, till it was tame to take our departer, that it was not in my power. I am extremely sorry to hear by Mrs Cushing that you was very unwell, when she left you; but hope that you are quite recovered; by this, & that you will enjoy the society of your friends and neighbours this winter,...
I have your letter of the 1st. inst. and yesterday visited Mr. Hellen & his family, they are all well and received no injury from the late invasion, they all however retired into the Country for a few day’s under great terror, the enemy however did not approach their house nearer than the Palace, distant about one mile—I enclose the report of the naval Committee expressive of the gallant...
I received your very complimentary letter of the 6th of September, I rejoice with you at the splendid victory obtained by Capt. Hull fighting under the brilliant Colours of the Constitution and I mourn with you, for my Country at large, on the fatal Capture of the Northwestern Army under General Hull, there is no calculating the immensity of the horrid scenes, which must inevitably follow,...
I have your letter of the 16th I hasten to ansr. it as I have by the same post receivd a Letter from our dear Caroline from Schnectady giving an account of the safe arrival of the Party there in improved health they go on to Ballstown to try the Springs & from thence proceed to Quincy; where I now have no doubt but they will arrive safe—I have addressd the paper of the day to Caroline by which...
It has been many weeks since I have heard from you; I hope you have enjoyed health. Our Winter has been very temperate, so warm that we could have no sleighing, & great dificulty the people have had to transport the produce of their rich Farms—I pitied their Cattle, more than their Masters for many broke their Limbs, & died. I mended a Shirt and several things for Cousin William and John which...
I have the Honor to acknowledge the receipt of your Letter of the 30th. I am much gratified that the proceedings of this Brigade meets with your approbation, I hope it will be entitled to your good opinion and wishes to the end of its military Career—my assiduities and pointed attention shall not be wanting— I have daily causes of exultation, and am very frequently complimented, By The...
I was very much gratified to find that it was not the Presidents, your own, or your family’s Sickness which prevented your writing, & that the delay was owing only to much company, & that in the Circle was your excellent worthy Friend Mrs Cushing—I know both the President, & my Sister highly enjoy her society, & rank her among the faithful of the Earth, for she is one with whom you can realize...
I hope my dear Sister, & family are well, though I have not heard from her for three last mails—Has Col. Smith, & Sister, arrived Safe?—How is good Dr Tufts, & poor aged Phebe? I hope, she has solacing & comfortable views of the Heavenly world, & humble trust in Him, who has made of one blood all the Nations of the Earth—& has said, he who feareth God, & worketh righteousness shall be...
Indolence shall no longer prevent my acknowledging, the pleasure I felt (my dear Mrs. Adams) from your kind & affectionate letter which I received some time ago. Your sentiments on the subject of friends are so congenial with my own, that I wish by every means in my power, to cherish with the warmest affection, the few that are spared to me. The last respects were paid to our friend Mrs...
I too my Dear Sister, have to address you from the Bed of Sickness— The wednesday night after I wrote to you last, I was waked with a shaking fit great distress at my vitals, which was succeeded by a regular Lung fever—I have had specimens of this fever twice before in the course of my Life, but nothing so severe as now—But through the goodness of an ever kind Providence, the Crisis formed the...
With pleasure & I hope, with Gratitude, I take up my pen, to assure you my dear Mrs A that we are all in perfect health; & could I but know that all the dear friends, I have left behind were so too, I should feel better reconciled to so long a seperation from them; having Husband & children with me, I could endure all other privations, & they are not few with great patience. A principle one...
The peircing cold air of this Month has made me quiver so that I could not quit the fire side scarcely for a moment, & it has gone to the marrow of Mr Peabody’s bones, so that it has made him very lame again, & is obliged to walk with a cane—But otherways he is a well as could be expected, for which I desire to be grateful, to that gracious Being who has brought us to see the return of another...
Agreable to your wish, expressed some months past, Mrs: Smith, accompanied by Miss Caroline and Our son William, pay you a visit, I lament that it is not in my power to accompany them, but agreable to the old tune, I cannot leave my post, as Besides the paper War is recommencing, and as We are threatned with a broad side, I must recive it, & proceed to action, against the Clintonian...
I have received your Letter of the 5th. inst. with its enclosures, to and from the Secretary. I thank you for the interest you have taken in in the promotion of my wishes, relative to military command, but I at present think it is almost too late—If my profered Services had been accepted, in the first instance, I am conscious I could have rendered material Service, but as affairs are now...
When you were here, I lent a great Coat, a small one—to Mrs Harrod, to keep of the rain, which she says, she put the next morning into the Carriage—I suppose your Man, forgot to bring it into the house—I thought it was at Mr Harrods, & did not send for it, till the week before I was sick—It has a piece set in behind on the shoulder—If it should be found, please to let it be taken care of—you...
Yesterday as soon as the mail arrived I sent to the Office full of expectation of receiving a Letter from my dear Sister—Are you all so absorbed in matrimonial affairs, as that none of your family can find leisure to give me the least intelligence how you progress, & how you all do?—Our amicable Cousin Hannah, has had the indisoluable knot completed at last, I see by the news paper—& your...
I have but just received your very Sisterly Letter, by Mrs Adams, handed me this morning. I immediately sat down & wrote to my Son, urged him to adjust his affairs with his Landlady, pay if possible, & thank her for any extra—kindness he has received—& quit her House as soon as convenient—I certainly know he may obtain respectable Boarding, at good Houses, for a less price—A little unconcern,...
I am sorry you did not find time to write me a line—reports are so various, & calamitous that it keeps me in constant agitation of mind—I am distressed for my country, & for my dear Boston friends, who I hear are moving as fast as they can find an asylum—I wanted, & intended to have written to my dear Son, & Mrs Foster, but I have been obliged this week to go to N ewbury, & have been to...
I wrote you from Worcester, which before this, I hope you have received. We lodged last night at Palmer, dined at Suffeild and arrived here this evening little after seven. We stopt a few moments at Windsor to see the Chief Justice—who says he enjoys better health at present, than he has for many years past. The Presidents old friend Mr. Trumbull was well enough to walk to the tavern and spend...
will be so good as to send the enclosed to Dr Tufts, & she will oblige me—I have not time now only to request you to give our love to the dear Lads, who are going to the arms of the best of Parents—May they reach him in safty, & rejoice his heart—My dear Brother, & Sister, have long sacrificed private feelings, to the publick Interest—Though I regret the satisfaction you are deprived of, in...
Welcome thou best of women thou best of sisters, thou kindest of Friends, the soother of ever y human woe to the city of Washington. Welcome to the best Men Welcome to a who love, honor & respects: you take their Sweet offspring to your benevolent Bosom & say to them Thus would your grandmama do if she could hold you in her arms.—I tremble I can scarcely hold my pen other s must tell you how I...
By Major Toussard, we had the pleasure to hear of your being at Scotch plains in health, and of your being escorted a few miles from thence by some of the officers. By a letter from Malcom, I heard of your arrival at N York, and of your intention to leave that city on Saturday Morn. I presume by the time, this can reach Brookfield, you will be there—I shall direct it, under cover to Mr....
I have the pleasure to inform you, that your dear Grandchildren reached here Friday noon, safe, & are very well in health, & I do not know that a greater share was every enjoyed in this Town, & in the Towns near us, than has been for months past—The Spotted Fever has afflicted many families, north, & west of us, but as yet, we have been preserved—& I hope Heaven will continue its merciful...
I was much gratified by the receipt of a few lines from you under date of Feby. 11th. enclosing a Letter from my Son William whose improvement I notice with pleasure— my Son John attends his dear mother and Sister on a visit to you, I proposed to attend Mrs: S. the last fall, and again pressed her to visit you in the Winter being confident both you and herself would feel more at ease than...
I clos’d my last Letter by informing you that Mr & Mrs Gannett were returned. I went down to receive them & found them both sick he with the Gout in his Foot & She with a violent cold I had them both to nurse till the next morning for it rain’d so hard all the afternoon that they could not return home—Mrs Norton is got below to day but is very feeble, & I hop’d to have had our house not quite...
We arrived at this place last evening about seven Oclock, where we have found most excellent accommodations. We have been highly favored with charming weather—excellent roads and good entertainment ever since we left you—find the chariot a much easier carriage than the coaches. The President thinks he never made so great a progress in his journey with so much ease to himself as the present. At...
I received your kind letter of the 22d. of Feby. this morning—I have the pleasure to inform you of the restoration of my health—Congress will adjourn of course on Friday next—the roads are intollerably bad I have my horse and Sulkey with me, and after the roads get a little settled, I shall travel on gently to new york, and perhaps to the Valley—an extra meeting of Congress will take place,...
Mrs: Smith is playing with Caroline and having wrote yesterday, says I must introduce The Bearer—Brigade Major Coxe of the 12th. Regt. to the drawing room—he visits Philadelphia on Furlough, proposing to spend a few day’s there, Should he be there on a drawing room, day, permit his admittance, and be pleased to let Mr. Shaw to be attentive to him for the sake of his gout . he is entitled to...
I feel much obliged my Dear Sister, to the Christian Desciple for the mild, & pacific Principles, which he so zealously endeavours to inculcate—I hope the Writers feel there powerful influence upon their own Hearts—"Wrath, & Evil Speaking," never made one Proselite , any more than the tortures of an Inquisition—If we must be stigmatized, reprobated as Harties, fools, & Knaves, because we...
By yesterday mail I received your kind letter. It is indeed a great while since we have heard from each other, I have thought I would write every day, but have not had a moments leisure & I hoped we should be in better health for I did not wish to send you a doleful ditty of our troubles—for every family seems to have as much as they know how to bear—But for this month past we have been very...
In behalf of the kindest and best of Brothers I thank you my most respected Cousin for your kind attentions at this present time of affliction. I have known sorrow but none has equeall’d this, to be—to be brought to such an humbling situation by one who has always profess’d the most profound friendship is doubly agravating On Monday I thought it was more than human nature could bear,—but he...
After quite an agreeable journey we arrived at this place on the 10th inst. where we have found much better accommodations than we had any reason to expect. We are at present with two old maids Miss Barnes’s, who appear to be civil and obligeing—they have furnished the President with two rooms, a parlour handsomely furnished and a convenient bed chamber. The City is very much crouded at...