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A Day since I saw Mrs Harrod & she informed me that you had thoughts of making us a visit, & to take your Daughter Adams, Abigail, Elizabeth, & Thomas, in the Carriage with you—Will not the President do us the favour of a visit—Mr Peabody & I, both wish we had anything in this Town to render it more agreeable—When I lived in Haverhill, we could have company to amuse him more congenial to his...
I received your letter enclosing one addressed to Mr. Adams, and presented it to the Secretary of State it will be forwarded with the public dispatches to Gent. I do not admire Williams return at this moment, having recieved his Commission as Secretary of the Legation, I think he had better hold it, and remain abroad for the present—least he should be on his Way I stated to Mr. Monroe, as he...
It is a long time my Dear Sister, since I have written to you; but I consider it a priviledge that we can think of our Friends, animate our Souls by a view of their useful lives, & refresh ourselves by a retrospect of past scenes, when we cannot find one leisure moment to visit them, or impress our Ideas upon paper.— Ever since Thansgiving we have had one, or other of our Family sick in bed,...
I was in hopes of receiving a Letter by yesterdays Mail from you—I was glad to see by the News Papers that Col. Smith, who formerly girded on the Sword for his country’s defence, was now opening his mouth, I trust in wisdom, advocating the same noble cause—What will be the issue of the present agitation of your State, & ours, I cannot predict, but I fear, unless great pains is taken to...
I have the pleasure of acknowledging the receipt of your Letter of the 30th. of June, and enclose you a letter from Mrs Smith, which I received yesterday, two from Caroline and one from my Son John, whose affectionate attentions have no doubt contributed much to the restoration of their dear Mother’s health, who I am extreamly happy to find is able to travel and that she is now on her way to...
I received your letter yesterday, which informed me of yours, & Mrs Smith’s intended visit, & am glad if you were able to go, & were disposed “to bury the Hatchet ,” it is certainly best, when we are all so far advanced in age, & hope to meet in those blest abodes where Peace, & Love reign forever—where raging Party Spirit, Injustice, ambition, & mavolence cease— you had a fine day for your...
I could not my dear Mrs Adams hear of the sudden death of your beloved Sister, without sympathizing in your sorrows; you like myself, have recently been call’d to part with many dear friends. The tender cords, of consanguinity friendship & affection are breaking fast from us, & we are every day call’d to mourn, for our own, or the publick loss. Your sister’s has been a useful & an active life,...
I have your letter of the 22d. of march, and am much gratified that my enquiries and communications relative to Mr. De Wint meet wit your approbation—you will no doubt observe by my last letter to my dear Caroline, that ultimately my Ideas fully correspond with your own, and thinking that I was hard with the young man, I softened my letter, and withdrew from that stern position that I had...
By last Friday mail, I received your very excellent Letter, wherein you observe, it was thought a journey might be of service to your health, I have not time now to make any remarks, only upon this part of your Letter, & warmly would second the motion, & would wish you to set off immediately, without stoping to adjust every preliminary —For if you do, you will see, I fear so many Lions, in the...
It is a sad misfortune to dear Connections when their Friends do not love to write—Some I know have not time, & some have not ability, & some foolishly averse—I have not heard from Mr Fosters family, since Abby’s return from Boston.—I wish I knew how my Son likes his new Boarding place—&c—I hope he has not been confined by Rhumatism this winter—& am very sorry Mrs Smith inherits the infirmity...
Your very interesting Letter of last week in which you mention the departure of your dear Caroline, with so much affectionate regret, is a pleasing evidence of her intrinsick worth.—I hope she has comfortably reached her Home, & is seated by her worthy Partner in their own Mansion, kindly welcomed to the arms of a fond Mother, where she may safely repose without fear of molestation, or dread...
Your favor of the 28th inst I this morning had the pleasure to receive and for which my best thanks are due you. With this you will receive a letter from Mr T. Adams received last evening—I think the probability is that he will be with us this Afternoon. The Chief Justice and Govenor Davie have both left this place for New port where Captain Barrey is waiting to receive them and to carry them...
To day I re ceived your Letter with its contents all safe, & thank you for your care & for your obliging me with the perusal of your Son’s excellent Letter—I consider every word as Truth —a just representation of the state of our affairs, of which we have little, I believe in our public papers—I have not time to say now what I wish—I shall inclose his letter, for dear you may want it, & the...
I hope my Dear Sister has had her Cup of happiness filled, by having an amiable long absent Son, with his wife & little One, sit at her Thanksgiving Table. I have not heard of his return from Washington, but presumed it would be an object with him to be with his beloved Parents upon that Day. I thought of the pleasurable Circle, & sincerely wished myself one of the Affectionate Band, for I...
I have perused the Letters from Russia which you were so good as to forward to me, I submitted them as you requested to The perusal of the Vice President, who when he returned them, he expressed his thanks for the confidential communication & observed “they develope the Character of the british administration, as well as the opinions of our friend Mr. J. Q. A. on the subject” I have a Letter...
I am at present much occupied in closing the military scene here, I shall effect it fully on the 14th. conformable to the wishes of Government—there is every appearance of its being closed with military propriety— concluding the perusal of the enclosed would give you pleasure, I transmit it—it might perhaps not be amiss to put it in one of the Boston papers.— Mrs: Smith and Caroline are well...
Last Tuesday the Horn blew to announce the Departure of the Mail an Hour sooner than the usual Time, which obliged me to break of abrubtly, even without any Signature—Though I suppose you would know from whom it came, by the badness of the writing, & local Circumstances—I find since my last Fall sickness that my hands tremble more than they used— Not received a Letter from you, nor my Cousin,...
I have received the things you sent me by Townsend and my Aunt Cranch with your letter of this morning and the shirts, for which please to receive my thanks. I find this town so very noisy and the present situation in which I am so very different, on many accounts from any in which I have ever before been, that it will take some time before I shall become naturalized. This circumstance and not...
I have been honoured by your Letter of the 18th—I have noticed its Contents, I consent to your wishes, and I will smother my own, if my heart cracks—My Idea of happiness rests on the ability properly exercised—to promote the happiness of others, whenever I am furnished with this ability I exercise it, and consider myself obliged by the oportunity, I have written to Mrs. Smith, & you will...
Mr Lion and his intended I suppose so , as the modern phrase is, called here last Wednesday—I was very glad to see any one from your house, that could give me any information of my Dear Sisters health & welfare—I told Mary, she I fancied, was going to add one more pair to the Nuptial Circle of your Dometicks—She with down cast smiling simpers, blushed the Affirmative— She talked as if she...
Our papers have given you the State of the Poll for Govr. as farr as they have been rec. the Votes from the two Western Counties have turn’d the Balance much in favor of Mr. Strong the Eastern Counties are nearly devided.—the returns this week will determine the question.—I am happy to hear that our Envoys are safe. they must have had a very disagreable time after they left Lisbon. a Ship has...
I was very glad to hear by the Letter you sent me from Brookfield that you had got safely so far. the week proved so stormy & disagreable—I was affraid I should hear you were sick. This week has been in general so pleasant excepting one day very windy that I hope you are safe at East Chester this evening, & that the President is recover’d from his cold, your children well & the sweet Caroline...
Your favors of the 19th & 22d I have recd. no Vessell at present is up for Phila.a. If any one offers, I will endeavour to procure the articles you wish to be sent. it is now so late in the season, that I do not expect I shall forward them— I am much oblig’d to you for the papers you inclos’d. such Mad Men, as Cooper can never do any injury to the Government. Their mad zeal, defeats their own...
I hear by Dr Tufts that our Medford Farm will be greatly injured by the middlesex Canal being cut through the land—I am very sorry to have what little landed property I have destroyed—But I suppose it will do no service to object—people are so very economick, & publick spirited at this day, that every thing must be sacrificed to the common weal—But the President, & you my Sister know much more...
The night before, our Exhibition I received your kind letter, which indeed sunk my spirits, as you can well suppose. My poor sick Son!—I had heard he had been ill, but was much better—& I hoped as I heard nothing from any one, that he had gotten quite well. I write to let him know that it is the joint request of Mr Peabody & myself that he would come & endeavour to revisit in the good air of...
Enclosed I send you a letter from my dear Caroline mentioning that my dear Mrs: Smith is getting better—It will give her great pleasure to have our Son John with her for a time— On Thurday last I dined at the Presidents and was honoured with the seat next to Mrs: Madison, who is a polite amiable elegant Lady, She entered on the Subject of Williams marriage and expressed herself very much in...
To tell you that I am exceedingly grieved , to hear that you have been very sick, would be to inform you, of what I am sure you already know. For, when three Sisters love each other, with such sincere affection, the One, does not experience Sorrow, Pain, or affliction of any kind, but the Others Heart wishes to relieve, & vibrates in tender Unison. Like a well organized musical Instrument, one...
I have your Letter of the 2d. inst. one from My dear Caroline of the 28th. of Febry. and one from my son John of the first and one from Mr. DeWint of the 2d. inst. all of which I have answered, the majority however goes by this post— The subject is highly interesting I have promptly answered Caroline, my Son and Mr. De Wint— I wrote a note to The Hon ble : Mr. Oakley a member in Congress from...
It was with peculiar pleasure my dear Mrs Adams that I received your kind favour of 5th of April, having heard of the accident you met with, I was fearful it might have been attended with bad concequences. Your neighbours whom you mention as being sick, I hope are in a state of convalescence & that Quincy air, is more salubrious than it has been for some time past. That the weather has been...
your good grandchildren are just gone to repose in the arms of sweet Sleep, soothed by the consciousness of having endeavoured I trust to perform their duty to one of the best of Parents—I was so pleased with their coming to see us, that I could not bear to deprive myself of one moment of their company till they had retired to their bed—And now I embrace one moment, to assure you, of my...
You will now have no occasion to wish for more Snow, if at Quincy you are favoured with as much as we are in Atkinson—I find it adds much to the coldness of the Atmosphere, though it has made it better travelling—I hope I feel grateful to Heaven for preserving us as yet, in so much better health than we had in our family last winter— The spotted fever, I see by the papers, has again commenced...
Some time since Andrew Foster, a relation of Mrs. Otis, applied to Mr. Otis for admission as student of law in his office—Mr. O. told him, that he then had his full number, the bar having limited themselves to three students at one time—that he could not then admit him, but that probably on Mr. Adams return, I should prefer studying in his office, and if so, Foster then might fill my vacancy....
It has been a cold backward Spring, & Abby could not get abroad as I wished, she has a great deal of pain in her side yet, but I think her feverish habit abates, if her appetite was but good I should be greatly encouraged, & hope she would soon be as well as ever—I am rejoiced to hear Mrs Foster has a Daughter, & comfortable, from what you wrote, I was greatly concerned about her. Mrs Norton &...
There is a great deal of pain; taken to make mischief between you & Mr & Mrs. Porter Many wish for his birth but I am confident no one who has offer’d would take better care of your things in the house or to Whom you could trust them with equal satefy. James Howard is very busy & very abusive, told mr. cranch that he heard Mr Porter was going, & that it was time he should—he loved his tricks....
I send you another paper with the second proclamation of Genera l Smyth, with observations on it—these proclamations produce a very great sensation thro’ the whole of this state—the allusion Scored in the paper came thus scored from Albany—I suppose by the Editor—But if the people at the election succeed in their votes for W:S.S. I think he had better go to Washington than to an ill arranged...
To Correct an error has been Considerd as proof of a Candid Mind—Will you then permit me my much respected friend to express to you,— And by thus doing obtain your forgiveness ,—if I have in the least wounded your feelings by any expressions derogatory to that respect & esteem at all times due to one so much my Superior, and to whom I Consider myself under great Obligations.—I know the...
Altho’ I did not Accept of your kind invitation for yesterday, it was then my intention to have been with you to day but alas we know not what a day will bring forth My good Brother is unexpectedly remov’d from Office and it has thrown us all into such Consternation that with my present feelings I could not partake of that pleasure—which I have ever receivd & had anticipated the ensuing...
The roads have been so bad & the weather such that I had almost despaired of ever hearing again from Quincy—I am very happy to hear that you and the President are well again—I left last week a letter & a number of papers at Connors for Mrs Black to take to Quincy. I hope you have received them. I send by Richard to days & yesterdays papers, with a number of papers & a letter from Wheaton,...
Before I left Philadelphia, I wrote you, expecting the letter would overtake you at Brookfield. The rain on monday prevented our leaving the city till Tuesday, as we had previously intended. The great rains, which they have had this way, have made the roads very bad—they are ploughed up, by the heavy loaded German waggons, exactly like the corn fields in New-England, and you might with equal...
I donnot like to let a week pass without writing a few Lines to let you know how we are & what we are about. as to your House if the winter holds on at the rate it has done since March came in it will not be very soon done. we had for two days past a violent storm of rain snow & hail, & tis now very cold. Judge cushing is not yet arriv’d at least I have not heard of them & I think I should if...
Last week I went to Newburyport to accompany Capt Peabody, when I returned a Letter from my Sister Cranch was handed me, which announced the joyful tidings of the birth of your Grandchild—Most sincerely I congratulate you, & the Parents, who by this circumstance I suppose, are made completely happy—I long to clasp my dear Thomas & Nancys little Bantling to my bosom, I hope it will live, and be...
I have received your letter favour of the 20th Instant enclosing Mr Clarks letter and your reply—My Daughter has been with you from her Infantcy—you made me exacted a promise that I would never take her from you while you lived—I have however painful the relinquishment—adheared to my promis—you are now going to resign her to the protection of a stranger—If your heart sanctions the...
None but an affectionate Sister, can tell how much I was gratified, to recognize your well known hand, & to find you able to offer a tribute of gratitude, in the congregation of the living, to that Being, who has so kindly raised you from sickness, & restored you to the dear companion of your youth, the Children of your Love, & the anxious trembling friends of your Heart. You say, you were...
By Mrs Welsh, who spent the afternoon with us, I was informed that Your dear Grandson was going to Russia. He will be an agreeable, interesting Companion, for he is possessed of singular strength of Mind—And if he goes, may the Angel of Mercy, be commissioned be to smooth his Passage, & waft him in safty over the briny Ocean, with prosperous Gales, & conduct him to the embraces of parental...
I have just clos’d a long Letter to Sister Peabody from whom I received one last week—It is the first I have written to her since I was sick She is well herself but Mr. Peabody has been more unwell than since they were married a sore in his ear attended with great pain in his neck he is better, & got out again—I hope you my dear Sister are well of your cold, but your troubles must be great...
By your Letter I was glad to find it was only the agitation occasioned by extraordinary, & unexpected events which prevented your usual kindness of writing, & not your own; or family’s Sickness—We were brought almost to the depths of dispair respecting Peace, & the sudden assurance of it, was like the blaze of meridian day, without the twilight— My fears now are that, like Jeshuran we shall...
The last letter I wrote you was from Frederick Town. I should have written to you more frequently, while on the road and sooner after our arrival in this city, had it not been for the concourse of people, from the time of his reaching entering, till he left a house, which has continually surrounded the; P. residen t, and which, in this warm weather, was infinitely more fatigiueing than his...
I inclose you Mr. Ames’s Oration deliver’d before the Legislature. Yesterday agreable to the recommendation of Co n gress was devoted to religious worship. Business was suspended and I never knew; a public Fast observed more seriously. all the Houses for Public worship were open in the Morning for prayers & solemn musick. the General Court attending at Brattle Street. Dr. Thacher deliver’d the...
I hope my Dear Sister’s Fibres are not so relaxed by the late intense heat of the weather, as not to be able to hold a Pen, & by her communications inform, comfort, & eddify her anxious Sister, & Friends—I was agreeably supprized by receiving two very kind letters from our good Brother Cranch, since my return to Atkinson—They gave me a very gratifying account of our dear Sister’s gradual...
I am rejoiced to hear that you, & my niece got home safe. Such little excursions are really advantageous to our Health—We require some relief from the same round of cares, & objects. Though I have often found myself fatigued at the time, yet the Friendship & cordiality of my Friends, has proved the balm of Life, & very beneficial to my health & spirits— To your kind enquiries after my Abbys...