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I am myself, my dear Madam, in great trouble—since my date of yesterday, my amiable son the Collector, unaccompanied by any man, was followed on the street by a ruffian neighbour, who after several scurrilous epithets of abuse, lifted his vulgar fist & gave him such a blow in his right eye that it appears doubtful whether he will again have the use of it.—This man, one Joseph Bartlett has been...
General Boyd, Mr Stores, Mr Forbes, and Mr and Mrs. Everett, have all arrived in London within the week past; and by them, with many other Letters and despatches I have received your favours of 5. and of 26. November—There must be I think a Letter in arrear between the 30th. of September and the 5th. of Novr—You acknowledge the receipt of my Numbers 92 and 93—and 97 and 98. I hope the...
Altho’ I have not had the pleasure to receive a letter from you, since I last wrote; yet your goodness to me on all occasions gives me the assurance that you will excuse the liberty I now take to ask a favor for my daughter Manners; she has I suppose sail’d for England before this time, and in her last letter to me express’d a wish to get a letter of introduction to our Minister at the Court...
I have not been unmindful of you my Dear Friend, nor of each member of your worthy family since leaving your hospitable Mansion, where christian graces adorn the possessors. My delay in writing in hopes of sending the promised Receipt has been in vain, for it has been to no purpose that I have repeatedly searched for it. However I do not regret it so much as I otherwise should do as the Root...
With the most timid respect do I address Mrs: Adams on a subject so interesting to me that I tremble while I write from a doubt of the propriety of the step, however solicitude for an affectionate Husband and our young family outweighs my scruples and prompts me to the measure. I must therefore rely upon the noble generosity of a character I have known and revered from my infancy, to pardon...
Your kind attention in answering my letters heretofore, and my last being yet unanswered excites the apprehension that your health has been worse than common this winter I hope I may hear of any other cause, except an abatement in your friendship, but that I do not for a moment admit—Your condsending goodness to me has perhaps caused me to expect more than I have a right to look for, more...
I have at length returned to the City for the purpose of remaining in it during the rest of the Season. We do not yet pretend to be free from cases of autumnal fever, which have been particularly malignant and fatal; but those, who, like myself, are believers in domestic origin, may return without apprehension. From my brother I have had accounts, from time to time, of the health of our family...
We arrived here last night, or rather yesterday at one o Clock and here we dined and Slept. The Building is in a State to be habitable. And now we wish for your Company. The Account you give of the melancholly State of our dear Brother Mr Cranch and his family is really distressing and must Severely afflict you. I most cordially Sympathize with you and them. I have Seen only Mr Marshall and Mr...
Your very kind letter has eased my heart of a load of anxiety, on account of our dear George, whose health appear’d to me to be in a very indifferent state. and I could not have quitted him with any satisfaction, had I not placed him under your protection. recieve my dear Madam our united thanks for your extreme kindness in taking him to Atkinson which journey I sincerely hope proved...
There have been a multitude of American Vessels, wind–bound at Liverpool near two months, several of which have Letters for you, and for my father, and which I suppose will nearly all arrive about the same time—In the interval there will be a wide chasm during which you will be without advices from us, as we have now been long without any from you—The present will go by Mr A. H. Everett, who...
I avail myself of the opportunity that now offers of writing to my dear and absent Sisters whose affection for me will receive a severe pang, from the melancholy events that have lately occured. My mind has become in some degree resigned to the Will of Heaven. Your sympathizing and Maturnal Friendship has soothed and comforted my afflicted heart whose sorrows can only find alleviation in the...
Accept my thanks my Dear Madam for your kindness in so promptly favoring me with your Advice from my eagerness to obtain your opinion I over looked the liberty I took in requesting it. I hope this will prove a sufficient apology my dear Mr Adams for my having obtruded my private Affairs on your time. Suffer me to offer my Thanks for the valuable counsel you have gained for me believe me I...
I am favoured this morning with yours of the 23d.—This is Accession day you know. I shall always consider it as a red Letter day: a fortunate day. I am happy to know that you are comfortably situated. I pray you to live in all Things at your own Expence and be no Burthen to Mrs. Smith or the Lt. Col. I am pretty well recovered of my Cold, but it has reduced my flesh. James Has found a...
Yours of the 21st. Ulto. and the 6th. Inst. came to hand Yesterday with $200 enclos’d, this Day have given orders to Mr Bates to proceed, with all Dispatch—he says You left undecided the Dimensions of the lower Room of the proposed Addition—27 by 20 was mentiond, but whether of that or less Dimensions he is uncertain—The Height also of the Room is wanted—How much is to be dropd from the Level...
I fear my dear Madam that long before this you have taxed me with neglect. But however strong appearances are against me, not a day has passed since we parted in a snow storm, that my good wishes for your health & happiness have been omitted. Mr Cushing had business at Norwich, which obliged us to return that way. I then intended & fully expected, as soon as we had arranged the family in some...
A few days since I recieved your very obliging letter in which you mention having procured the articles I wrote for and for which I return you many thanks. I am much distressed at the idea your letter seems to convey of want of respect or attention to Mrs. Cranch it has ever been my most ardent desire so to conduct myself to every branch of your family as not only to merit their esteem but...
Your letter of the 24th of march, my dear Madam, is but just arrived, and although it was so long before it reached us, it afforded us the satisfaction of hearing from yourself, that my dear Boys were well at that period.—We have not yet heard any thing of Mr Harrod, I fear he has stopped at some other port in the Baltic, and that we shall not see him at Petersburg this Season—I feel much...
Having an opportunity to write you by Mr Lewis of Philadelphia who leaves this place for England early tomorrow morning I hasten to inform you of the general health of the family which although not perfect is as good as we can rationally expect Winter comes on us in so harsh a form that we anticipate an unusual degree of severity in its course this morning the River and Canals were hard frozen...
A Treaty of Peace between the United States and Great Britain has this day been signed by the British and American Plenipotentiaries at this place. It is to be dispatched to-morrow, by Mr Hughes the Secretary of the American Mission, who is to sail in the Transit from Bordeaux—I have not time to write a single private Letter excepting this, but I request you to inform my brother that I have...
A kind note at the foot of mr Adams’s letter of July 15. reminds me of the duty of saluting you with friendship and respect; a duty long suspended by the unremitting labors of public engagement, and which ought to have been sooner revived, since I am become proprietor of my own time. and yet so it is, that in no course of life have I been ever more closely pressed by business than in the...
Your idea of Osterley park being near our house is correct it now belongs to the Countess of Jersey the grand daughter of Mrs: Childs whose daughter married the Earl of Westmoreland. Papa is so bysy he cannot take us any where not even to the play these holidays. I am afraid not but I hope so because I have not seen the Theatre Covent Garden or Drury lane but I hope in the Summer that Papa...
I have recd yours of 24th and thank you for your relation of our little domestic affairs at Quincy. Brisler did not arrive last night as you callculated. His Children may detain him longer than you expected.—Some of the public Offices are about removing to Phyladelphia this Week. I can Send James with my Horses and Charriot to meet you at Hoebucken Ferry or Elizabeth Town or any other Place...
My mind it seems had been in unison with yours for some time past, & I had determined the last week that another should not elapse without my writing for information respecting your, & the Presidents health, together with the various branches of your much valued family; & to say that the winter was passing away with us in as tranquil a maner as generally falls to the lot of humanity, rejoicing...
I lose no time in returning the enclosed letters, which came to hand to day, and for the perusal of which I beg leave to make my very sincere and cordial thanks. Such letters, from such a source, are a treat. It is the next thing to being in Europe, perhaps better in such times as these, and I am very thankful for the kind favor of being allowed to have them a little while in my possession. I...
I was much disappointed My Dear Madam in not having it in my power to see you again before we went to Newport & also in not calling on Mrs J Adams & Miss Johnston to have renewed my invitation to them that they would give us the pleasure of a visit this summer. I regret that I did not see them the day we were at Quincey; Delays are dangerous. Court held at Boston till Friy eveg prier to its...
The inclosed was written with design to forward by your Son, who I then presumed would have returned to Quincy the last Saturday the 17th—Judge Adams call’d on me the day he came to Plymouth & delivered your agreeable favor—I have not seen him since—I did not know he was going to Barnstable—is he there still—or has he return’d by the route of N. Bedford or Bridgwater?—Surely, he would not have...
I recd last night your Letter of the 11th. Your Girls and Mr Shipley arrived in good health and Spirits. I shall Send the Charriot this morning to meet you. It would be a great pleasure to me to go in it, but I am so engaged in indispensable business that I know not how to leave it and another thing of Some importance is your Son may take a Seat with you & Suzan in the Charriot and that will...
I cannot longer be silent while my friends are mourning the death of such a daughter as was our much loved Mrs Smith.—But why mourn?—She is happy and soon shall we also meet the termination of time, when, may we unite in the universal harmony of love and gratitude which attune the song of the righteous!— Mr Adams’s philosophic view of the changes of time and his belief in the sovereignty of...
It is with high respect that I have the honor to assure you, you have mistaken my “Register” as well as its character , in attributing to it an offensive article about “ Drawing Rooms; ” while I have to regret that this is not the first time in which my secret pride has been humbled by a similar misapprehension. And such mistakes are easily committed, because another paper is published (at...
Since I last wrote to you, I have received your kind Letters of 27. August, and of 10. June, which I mention in the order, not of their dates, but of their reception. That of June enclosed a printed Copy of Judge Story’s biographical eulogium of our late excellent friend Dexter, whose loss is a calamity to our Country, and especially to our Native State, which with all her errors and follies I...
I returned to the City the night before last on the 18th: day after my departure. My Father sat off on Tuesday and I found the house turned inside out. My own things were carefully packed up by Mr: Briesler and yesterday I had them removed to my lodgings in the same family that I was with last year. Mr: Briesler & family will be ready to sett out on Tuesday and will leave the house in good...
It is among the instances of good fortune which are now & then permitted to accompany the discharge of a public duty, that franking a Letter from the State Department in the absence of the Secretary has brought me to your recallection and attention. Judge Adams as I am informed has been requested to return to the United States as soon as circumstances will admit: and as no public vessel has...
I have spoken to one of the Providence Stage-coach Drivers; and upon the supposition that there will be, at least, two passengers besides yourself viz: your Son and a Maid Servant, if not a Man Servant also, and that the Coach must be at Braintree over night to take you early in the morning, if you shou’d choose to set off then, or, if it shou’d be more convenient to you, that you might order...
I left Cambridge yesterday, after having finished my weekly performance, to come here and meet my wife whom I expect hourly here—I received this morning letters from her, dated one at Philadelphia 30. July—and one at New-York 3. August—She was with my Sister, who was well and in good Spirits—She intended to stay over Commencement which was last Wednesday, and then come on as soon as possible—I...
With the same glow of affection which has for many years been cherished in my bosom, I received yours of the first Instt. and seldom indeed do I meet with any thing in the Letters of my Friend Mrs Adams that causes a moments uneasiness.—But I have been anxious since your last & more so since the arrival of this day’s Post least some accident may have happened to a valuable Packet which I was...
I owe you, dear Madam, a thousand thanks for the letters communicated in your favor of Dec. 15. and now returned. they give me more information than I possessed before of the family of mr Tracy. but what is infinitely interesting is the scene of the exchange of Louis XVIII. for Bonaparte. what lessons of wisdom mr Adams must have read in that short space of time! more than fall to the lot of...
Saturday night 9 O Clock and not before I recd yours of 13th. and the Letter to Thomas with it, brought here no doubt by mistake. I regret very much that you have not a Gentleman with you. The Skittish young Colt with you, is always timorous, but no harm will befall you or her I trust. The Weather and roads here, on Saturday Sunday and to day are the finest We have seen this year. The Election...
As we are on the point of departure and much engaged I can only write to mention that we are all well and very desirous of soon meeting you in Boston. The remainder of the time that we shall stay in this Country will be very unpleasant as we are harrassed to death in procuring furniture and such articles as may be useful to us in America according to the advice which you gave us in a Letter...
Mr: Cranch has taken the liberty to address a short letter to the President containing a desire to be tho’t of in the Various appointments now making in the line of his business—as he did not chuse to trouble the President with any details—embolden’d by your known condescention I have taken the pen to observe that since Mr Cranch’s letter to my Uncle relative to the Armory at Harpers Ferry...
My thanks are due to you My Dear Friend for a letter of the 1st. & it would afford me much enjoyment to visit Quincy this week, agreeable to your kind invitation; But my Sister Johnston is now passing a little time with us, a favor that we seldom enjoy so that I cannot leave home at present. By the last of Octr. it is my intention to be with you once more my Dear Madam, in whose society it is...
I inclose you a letter from my wife, who would have written you earlier but that George has been very ill with a fever, for several days—He is however, thank God now recovered. I have not written to you so often myself as I ought to have done, the only reason for which has been the ardour with which I have thoughtlessly thrown myself into the vortex of public business—The only object or use of...
Although I have not written since receiving your favors of July 12th., & August 2nd., yet my heart has been with you daily, knowing too well by woful experience what your anxieties must be for a beloved Sister struggling between life & death, whose society must be precious to all who have the pleasure of knowing her virtues, & how much more so must it be to her near & dear Relatives. I have a...
My health has been so indifferent and the City is so flat since the adjourment of Congress that I cannot find materials for a Letter—It is difficult for me to say what the nature of my indisposition as the Doctor cannot ascertain it no more than myself but I believe general weakness and a slight attack of what they here call chills and fevers has been my chief complaint and the latentness and...
After a pleasant although extremely fatiguing journey we have safely arrived at Mrs. Hellens were we found all the family in good health and spirits Mr. Adams’s health is much improved and he has gain’d flesh on the journey but I much fear that the exercise he takes will prove too much and again reduce him to his former state of debility- My spirits and health have both been very indifferent...
Upon receipt of your kind letter of the 17th. ulto. I was too deeply afflicted by the information it contained even to thank you for it, as I aught to have done. I inferr’d from it that my dear mother had gone to join the departed spirits of her mother, her father and those other friends from whom she had been so long separated by death. It was A day or two pass’d before I was undeceived; so...
I want words to express the grateful feelings of my heart for your kind sympathy on our late heavy affliction, we have indeed suffered a bereavement that can never be repaired to us as individuals or as a family.—A husband, a father, a protector, snatched from us with but little time to prepare our minds for such a stroke, twenty hours before his pure spirit fled from us forever, we had no...
I began to be quite uneasy at your long silence my and was much pleased to find by your Letter of the 12th that pleasure and not sickness was the cause of your delay in answering my last. I am very sorry to hear that Mrs de Wint health is weak and I agree with you in the opinion that she left home too early I hope however that when she returns and resumes her quiet mode of life that she will...
I had flattered myself that before this time we should have had the pleasure of a visit from you, & Miss Smith. It is some time since we have heard one word from Quincy. Be so good as to write & say when it is probable that our wishes may be realized in seeing you. Mrs Sumner left us last Friday; I requested her to call on you. I have a piece of information to give which nearly respects...
The arrival of Mr Bayard, & Galatin, my dear Madam, has made so little alteration in our situation, that I have little or nothing to write you, but complaints, of the prospect I have of a much lengthen’d stay in this Country: and the additional grief of losing the society of my Sister, which was almost the only thing left me to render life supportable. Mr A is even more buried in study than...
I have delay’d answering your very kind letter owing to my Baby’s having been very seriously sick and requiring all my attention during a fortnight. He is now entirely recover’d and has two teeth— I much fear it will be a long time before I shall be permitted to see you as every thing appears to be in such a state of confusion and hostility that it is impossible to form any idea of the time...