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You will imagine that the place from which I now write you has been thus named by us; but so it was not—We found the names already settled—Ealing is a parish in the immediate neighbourhood of Brentford, that “town of mud”—immortalized in the Poetry of Pope and Swift; and the house in which we reside has been thus named by its proprietor, in honour of a kinsman of his, one Lord Boston, who has...
I wrote to you about the 20th. Inst. which probably you have receiv’d by this Time—I rejoice to hear that Mr. Marshall has arrived and hope for the Arrival of the other Envoys soon—Their long & patient stay at Paris under a State of Humiliation, was considerd by many as too degrading, it may however have answered some good Purposes and eased the Minds of some who perhaps would have thought,...
It was with regret, that I left Boston without seeing you again, but we were in such a state of uncertainty, till it was tame to take our departer, that it was not in my power. I am extremely sorry to hear by Mrs Cushing that you was very unwell, when she left you; but hope that you are quite recovered; by this, & that you will enjoy the society of your friends and neighbours this winter,...
On the 24. May I had the very great satisfaction of receiving your kind letter of 23d. February. I felt doubly obligated to you for it as I conscious it must have been written under the impression, arising from the existing relations between the U. States and Britain, that the probabilities were very much against my ever receiving it; and I regret to say that the political appearances are not...
Last week I sent you a number of the Monthly Theological Repository, containing some Speculations of Mr Van der Kemp and Mr Jefferson—With this Letter I enclose to my Father the numbers just published of the Edinburgh and Quarterly Reviews—Presuming that you know the History and Character of those Publications from Cobbett, you will sufficiently understand them to be in the Nature of Lawyer’s...
I never received a Letter from my dear Mrs. Adams but that an emotion was awakened which is not felt in every epistolary intercourse.—When I saw her signature under date of Decr. 31st: my heart glowed with the same affection which had long been cherished in my bosom, towards one I had loved and placed confidence in, without a suspicion, that the regard was not mutual.— You assure me that there...
Not one word have I heard from you my dear Friend since your kind letter, saying that you was but just leaving the chamber, after a long confinement. I hope & pray that you soon regained your usual health though that at best is delicate. Various circumstances have prevented my being with you ere this. Three weeks since I was called to Plymouth, to sympathize with my beloved Mrs Hammatt for the...
I had the honor of your favor of the 14th of last month enclosed to me by Mr Smith, and upon this, as on all other occasions, was gratified at the receipt of it. There was also one for Mrs Madison, which I will take great pleasure in presenting to her, as soon as she returns to Washington. She is now expected in the course of a few days. I most sincerely hope, that the wishes of Mr John Adams...
I have received your Letters of 10. 15. and 16. Your solicitude for my Health may Subside. I am pretty well—I had a cold, not a bad one, and something of the Inflammation in my face of last Spring, but it is gone. Rush gave me such a Dose of Salts that I thought it not fit to go out to Congress next day. But the day after I was well enough...I am Old—Old very Old and never shall be very...
I was in hopes ere this time of having the satisfaction of seeing you here, but from what I could learn from Dr Bourn of Barnstable, who spoke with the President last week, it is to be feared that your unfortunate fall has occasioned a much longer confinement than we flattered ourselves it would. I have several times been determined that another week should not pass without my writing, but my...
As you my dear madam wrote last it may be my part according to the rules of Etiquette to Congratulate you on your perfect restoration to health, but the unceremonious friendly pen should be seized by the hand first able to hold it.— the similarity of our recent situation—tottering many months on the verge of the Grave, has been to my mind affecting indeed, when I have contemplated our next...
I feel too sensibly the obligations you have laid me under by the letters you had the goodness to write on the 3d. and 4th,—They deserve a better return than it is possible for me to make; while I can only offer the effusions of a grateful heart I see too plainly that those alone wou’d not be acceptable—You require a Serious engagement on my part which I am forbidden to make by motives that...
Our Sons John and Charles are come home from school this morning, to spend the Michaelmas Holidays, and have brought one of their schoolmates with them, to whom John has taken a great liking and who is nearly of his age. He was already here, part of the Summer Holidays, and is a very intelligent and well behaved boy. These Holidays come so often that I am not at all partial to them; but those...
I have your letter of the 1st. inst. and yesterday visited Mr. Hellen & his family, they are all well and received no injury from the late invasion, they all however retired into the Country for a few day’s under great terror, the enemy however did not approach their house nearer than the Palace, distant about one mile—I enclose the report of the naval Committee expressive of the gallant...
I received your very complimentary letter of the 6th of September, I rejoice with you at the splendid victory obtained by Capt. Hull fighting under the brilliant Colours of the Constitution and I mourn with you, for my Country at large, on the fatal Capture of the Northwestern Army under General Hull, there is no calculating the immensity of the horrid scenes, which must inevitably follow,...
Through the protecting hand of a gracious Providence, I am rising from a bed of Sickness, where I have been confined for more than three weeks—Indeed, I did not keep about but a few days after my last letter to you—Lydia was evidently much better her Tongue cleared, & her fever had a proper turn & had got to eating Beef, & drinking wine, but still her Cough hung round, & kept her too weak to...
Since my last, I have received your favours of 3d, 26th, 27th. 29th: May, and 12th: June. By your very kind and constant attention I find myself as regularly and recently informed of the current Events in our Country, as I could expect or wish—Your pamphlets and papers too, with those which I receive from the department of State are a treasure to me—I have written to the Secretary of State,...
Know all Men by these Presents, that We John Adams of Quincy in the County of Norfolk and Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Esquire, and Abigail Adams his Wife, In consideration of one Dollar to each of us paid by John Quincy Adams of Boston in the County of Suffolk & Commonwealth of Massachusetts aforesaid Esquire, the Receipt whereof We do hereby acknowledge and for diverse other good and...
I have your letter of the 16th I hasten to ansr. it as I have by the same post receivd a Letter from our dear Caroline from Schnectady giving an account of the safe arrival of the Party there in improved health they go on to Ballstown to try the Springs & from thence proceed to Quincy; where I now have no doubt but they will arrive safe—I have addressd the paper of the day to Caroline by which...
Though your last Letter was not immediately answered, I offer no apology but my own frequent infirmity. It was, my dear Mrs Adams, a very pleasant circumstance to me, to receive an account from your own hand, of your appreciated health, nor did I find in your late letter, any marks of the shattered condition of your head, of which you complain.—Indeed, I think the bough that bends to the gale,...
Your welcome letter of the 20th. instant I did not receive till last evening, on our return from Mount Vernon, where we had spent a very agreeable week, and left General and Mrs Washington in perfect health. they often mentioned the President and your self much wishing to see you at Mount Vernon. I am truly happy to find my account gave satisfaction, as to Mr Daltons conduct in the affair of...
It has been many weeks since I have heard from you; I hope you have enjoyed health. Our Winter has been very temperate, so warm that we could have no sleighing, & great dificulty the people have had to transport the produce of their rich Farms—I pitied their Cattle, more than their Masters for many broke their Limbs, & died. I mended a Shirt and several things for Cousin William and John which...
I wrote you last week by Captain Bronson, and sent you a Volume of Letters from the Continent, about the Battle of Waterloo and the like, by the Poet Walter Scott—I now send you a Newspaper in which you will find certain effusions of another personage, who is not only a Poet but a Lord—He has been married little more than a year, and is already separated from his wife—Partly, as his verses...
We have been under the necessity of delaying our journey a few days on account of the marriage of Harriet which took place on thursday evening at eight o’clock since which I have been so much engaged with company and preparations for my departure It has not been in my power to write you untill this morning—We propose leaving this place on Tuesday morning and shall probably reach Quincy in...
It is so long a time my beloved Friend since I have had the satisfaction of hearing from you, that I am induced notwithstanding the weakne ss of my eyes to write a few lines to ask after your welfare, with other Friends at Quincy & to offer my thanks for an affectionate letter written in a sick chamber, where I regreted much it was not in my power to have been with you. I took some cold on...
I have your favor of the 15th: instt: and thank you for your kind solicitude respecting my health, which is just passable and no more–The extremes of heat & cold have a sensible effect upon my Constitution, and though I am tolerably free from rheumatics and faintness, yet I have the old complexion, with a tinge of yellow less perhaps than when I left you. My feverish habit still hangs about...
I thank you My Dear, & revered Brother & Sister, for your repeated attentions to me, & mine. The Cold, & the Snow yet remaining upon the Earth, renders it I fear, very painful & unpleasant Weather for my Son. I hoped to receive a Letter from him before this time, Silence in any one else I should construe as inability, or an increase of Disease. Few Children I believe are half attentive enough...
I was most agreeably surprised about two weeks since by the receipt of your favor—As I had not counted upon a letter from you I feel the more obliged by your kind attention to my enquiries. Your letter gave both pleasure & pain. the information that you were at lenth on the recovery was to me extreemly gratifying—but to know that you still continued weak & indisposed so that you cou’d not...
I have not words, my dear Aunt, to express my gratitude for your kind and consoling letter of the 25th. ulto.—It was, as I wished, minute and particular respecting the last moments of my dear and venerable parents. Mr. Norton’s letters having been directed to George town remain’d there some days, so that your letter was contain’d the first information I received of the death of my mother,...
I recieved my dear and ever honoured Aunt your kind Letter of Decr 18th and the Cape accompanying it, for both which I feel myself greatly obliged, and beg you to accept my thanks. I am glad to hear from Mama that your health is better than it was the last winter. I hope the mildness of the season will assist in confirming it. I never remember finer weather in Decr, and Jany. than we have had—...