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Know all Men by these Presents, that We John Adams of Quincy in the County of Norfolk and Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Esquire, and Abigail Adams his Wife, In consideration of one Dollar to each of us paid by John Quincy Adams of Boston in the County of Suffolk & Commonwealth of Massachusetts aforesaid Esquire, the Receipt whereof We do hereby acknowledge and for diverse other good and...
When I take a retrospective view of the innumerable obligations which I owe you, not only as the revered Parents of my husband but as the kindest and best of friends, my heart expands with filial gratitude yet I know not how to attempt an expression of my feelings. After a residence of five years under your roof which has been endeared to me by some of the most interesting events of my life,...
Your idea of Osterley park being near our house is correct it now belongs to the Countess of Jersey the grand daughter of Mrs: Childs whose daughter married the Earl of Westmoreland. Papa is so bysy he cannot take us any where not even to the play these holidays. I am afraid not but I hope so because I have not seen the Theatre Covent Garden or Drury lane but I hope in the Summer that Papa...
At Mr: Fishwick’s School, where I am, there are sixteen boys besides myself, and besides his two daughters, Charlotte and Eliza. We learn on Mondays and Fridays Russian; on Tuesdays and Thursdays German; and on Tuesday Morning, Drawing; on Wednesdays and Fridays, French, Every day English Spelling and Grammar. Writing every day except Saturdays and cyphering sometimes. On Saturdays in the...
After having written to my Grandpapa, and my Brothers, I must not omit writing to you, to express my gratitude for your kindness to my Brothers, as well as to myself, longer ago than I can remember. We have now vacation time at school; and one Evening, Papa and Mama permitted me to have a party of my school-mates, and a few other young Gentlemen and Ladies of my acquaintance. We had a great...
I am now come home for the holidays and I hope to receive a great many letters but too I must mind to write to you as many times as you do to me There has been a latin play acted at Ealing called the Andrian one of Terences it was acted three times this year that is to say three times running as to the Actors I can not tell, I suppose you will soon hear Who they are; all I know is that George...
I have no line from you, since the 13th at Brookfield. There has been so much rainy weather as to have made travelling impracticable for you, some part of the time, and the roads disagreable at all times.—If your health fails not, Patience will bear the rest. We went to the Presbyterian Church yesterday and heard Mr Grant a young calvinistical Presbyterian of a good style and fair hopes....
I have received your letter of the 31st of August by Captain Brownson. I saw in an American Paper that Grandpapa has been on board the Seventy four which is in the command of Commadore Bainbrige and thought it a very fine Ship and and am in hopes of having a great many more by my return. I do not like England near so well as America nor do I think I should like any country so well as my native...
We arrived here last night, or rather yesterday at one o Clock and here we dined and Slept. The Building is in a State to be habitable. And now we wish for your Company. The Account you give of the melancholly State of our dear Brother Mr Cranch and his family is really distressing and must Severely afflict you. I most cordially Sympathize with you and them. I have Seen only Mr Marshall and Mr...
I am favoured this morning with yours of the 23d.—This is Accession day you know. I shall always consider it as a red Letter day: a fortunate day. I am happy to know that you are comfortably situated. I pray you to live in all Things at your own Expence and be no Burthen to Mrs. Smith or the Lt. Col. I am pretty well recovered of my Cold, but it has reduced my flesh. James Has found a...
I have recd yours of 24th and thank you for your relation of our little domestic affairs at Quincy. Brisler did not arrive last night as you callculated. His Children may detain him longer than you expected.—Some of the public Offices are about removing to Phyladelphia this Week. I can Send James with my Horses and Charriot to meet you at Hoebucken Ferry or Elizabeth Town or any other Place...
I recd last night your Letter of the 11th. Your Girls and Mr Shipley arrived in good health and Spirits. I shall Send the Charriot this morning to meet you. It would be a great pleasure to me to go in it, but I am so engaged in indispensable business that I know not how to leave it and another thing of Some importance is your Son may take a Seat with you & Suzan in the Charriot and that will...
Saturday night 9 O Clock and not before I recd yours of 13th. and the Letter to Thomas with it, brought here no doubt by mistake. I regret very much that you have not a Gentleman with you. The Skittish young Colt with you, is always timorous, but no harm will befall you or her I trust. The Weather and roads here, on Saturday Sunday and to day are the finest We have seen this year. The Election...
I wrote you this morning, But was not particular. It will be Six or Seven days before that or this can reach you. When you write me afterwards you may direct your Letters to remain at the Post Office at New Haven or Hartford or perhaps New York. I shall Sett out on my Journey northward on Monday the 16th at latest, but shall not ride more than twenty miles a day. I expect it will take me 30...
Your favour of the 20th has been to Phyladelphia and came back to me only last night: nor was this the fault of the Post Office—The Letter was addressed to Phyladelphia. It gave me great Joy and relieved me from much anxiety. I had recd. no news of you since your Letter of 13 from Brookfield. We had a sharp frost last night. Ice this morning on a Tub of water at the Door, a quarter of an Inch...
We arrived on the 10th. I, much oppressed by one of my great Colds, which is now going off.—I could obtain only one little Room and one little bedroom but We can make a shift. I came here more loaded with Sorrow than with Rheum. Sally opened her Mind to me for the first time. I pitied her, I grieved, I mourned but could do no more. a Madman possessed of the Devil can alone express or...
I have yours of 26 by Brisler and that of the 28th. this Morning. Thomas is in Phyladelphia and Brisler with his Family are going off this morning in the Stage. He will write me this Evening or tomorrow.—I expect to hear from you when and where you intend to Set out, and where you intend to be.—The offices of Treasury & State are gone to Phyladelphia. War, Navy & Law remain here, for...
I Sent you a Letter this morning before I recd yours of the 13. from Brookfield. I rejoice that you had arrived so far and born your Journey so well: but the Weather has been so wet that I doubt whether you have been able to reach East Chester to day. I am more convinced that the Air is a great Repository of Diseases and that it is impossible to guard against them. Be always ready. Yet I now...
I recd your favour of the 2d by Mr. Dexter and this morning from Mr. Gerry an account of your health on the 4th. which have relieved me from some anxiety as I had recd no Letter from you since you were in N. York. I have seen many Cities and fine Places since you left me and particularly Mount Vernon. Mrs Washington and her whole Family very kindly enquired after your health and all your...
I have written you but once since I bid you farewell. I was seized in Connecticutt with one of those direful Colds, which have sometimes brought my frame into danger and I was afraid to let you know how ill I was. I am now so much better as to be able to do Business. We have no News of you since the ninth indeed since the Note in which you told us of James’s fever. The Weather has given us...
You will imagine that the place from which I now write you has been thus named by us; but so it was not—We found the names already settled—Ealing is a parish in the immediate neighbourhood of Brentford, that “town of mud”—immortalized in the Poetry of Pope and Swift; and the house in which we reside has been thus named by its proprietor, in honour of a kinsman of his, one Lord Boston, who has...
Last week I sent you a number of the Monthly Theological Repository, containing some Speculations of Mr Van der Kemp and Mr Jefferson—With this Letter I enclose to my Father the numbers just published of the Edinburgh and Quarterly Reviews—Presuming that you know the History and Character of those Publications from Cobbett, you will sufficiently understand them to be in the Nature of Lawyer’s...
Our Sons John and Charles are come home from school this morning, to spend the Michaelmas Holidays, and have brought one of their schoolmates with them, to whom John has taken a great liking and who is nearly of his age. He was already here, part of the Summer Holidays, and is a very intelligent and well behaved boy. These Holidays come so often that I am not at all partial to them; but those...
I wrote you last week by Captain Bronson, and sent you a Volume of Letters from the Continent, about the Battle of Waterloo and the like, by the Poet Walter Scott—I now send you a Newspaper in which you will find certain effusions of another personage, who is not only a Poet but a Lord—He has been married little more than a year, and is already separated from his wife—Partly, as his verses...
This day two Months have elapsed since Mr Gallatin and Mr Bayard arrived and delivered to me your favours of 5 and 23 April—Nothing later from you has yet come to hand.—Very shortly after their arrival, the ship Hannibal, belonging to Mr Astor of New-York arrived at Gothenburg—This vessel was furnished with a British licence with a permission even to bring a Cargo, and to carry one back in...
I have just received your affectionate letter of the 15th:— and do not a moment delay to answer your question— I did attend the meeting of members at the Capitol on the 23d: of last Month— but not without invitation— I received the same invitation, which was given to the other members— And besides that I was also personally urged to attend, by another member of the Senate— I did not attend...
The late french Ambassador at this Court, the Duke de Vicence, has taken leave, and his succesor Count Lauriston has been received—He takes his departure this Evening or to-morrow for Paris, and I avail myself of the opportunity to enclose a line for you, under cover to Mr Russell our Chargé d’Affaires at that place—I have already sent several letters for you and for my brother to him to be...
I know not whether it was generosity, or any other virtue, or merely a disposition to receive the postage, that induced the transmission of your favour of 30. December to Mr: Williams at London; for by him it was kindly forwarded to me, and on the first day of this Month, to my inexpressible joy came to hand—It was but so short a time before that I had received your letter of 29. July!—and...
Yesterday Morning I received the first information of the ratification, by the Government of the United States of the Treaty of Peace concluded at Ghent on the 24th: of last December—The Ratification was received at London last Monday Evening the 13th: instant, and the Communication of the Event by Lord Castlereagh to the Lord Mayor was made about eleven O’Clock that Night—It was brought by...
Yesterday I went to London, to the anniversary dinner of the Society of Friends of foreigners in distress; of which Society our old friend Mr William Vaughan is Treasurer; and being in Town, I found at my Office, in Craven Street, three Letters Post-marked “Liverpool ship-Letter,” and superscribed to me, in one of the Quincy hand-writings; but on opening them I found myself accosted first as...