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As Mr. & Mrs. Johnson intend leaving us this evening I write you a few lines to assure you of our health and that of the charming family with whom we now are. Caroline and her children are quite well and happy and gave us the cheering welcome of an old and affectionate friend— The situation of Mrs. de Wirts house is beautiful but you have heard too much of it to need any description from me....
6 October Rose early and crossed in the Team Boat to Mrs. de Fish Kiln Landing Mr. de Wint having come over in his Carriage for us—found Caroline at the door who received us in the most affectionate manner and was very much astonished at seeing Mr. & Mrs. Johnson who they did not at all expect I was introduced to Mrs. de Wint a very fine Woman who gave us a kind and warm reception The Verplank...
After a most fatiguing journey in which I suffered grievously we arrived at half past nine o’clock last evening beaten and bruised and scarcely able to go through the additional trouble of undressing to go to bed—Not a single event has occurred worth detailing and I can only write you a short Letter as my shoulders are too stiff to admit of my saying any thing more than that we are alive and...
I declind answering your letter, untill I could obtain some details, which were material, in relation to its object. The interest, which you take, in favor of persons a family, with whom you are so closely connected, & with whose merit, you are so well acquainted, commands my great high respect & warm approbation, and it would give me much great satisfaction, if circumstances permitted, an...
Tomorrow we leave this place with the intention of visiting you in Boston if nothing should intervene and force us back again to Washington. We shall be in Boston the latter end of the next week as we propose to leave Philadelphia on Monday Morning—Our visit will necessarily be short Mr. A—— being obliged to return the beginning of next Month—we therefore wish to be as short a time on the road...
Mr. Adams’s business accumulates so rappidly and Genl. Jackson has cut out so much new and difficult work for the Government I despair of seeing you this year—Contrary to your idea Mr. Adams enjoys his health hitherto perfectly but I have totally lost the little share I possessed on my arrival in this Country as I now scarcely know what it is to be well two days together—my lungs are very much...
Mrs: Cruft has arrived here and it is with much pleasure I observe she has derived benefit from her journey—Her looks are very promising but in her complaint it is difficult to ascertain her real state through so treacherous as in her a medium; as in her complaints good looks are acknowledged to be false guides and frequently delude us into hope when in reality hope ought to be the least...
I am ashamed to find upon my file of Letters to be answered , one from you of 29. January; besides two or three from my father of as old standing—you know however the only cause, which has occasioned so long a postponement of my reply—There has been I believe no change in the office of Collector at Plymouth; and it was with much pain that I learnt it was probable there would be. Should it...
I hail this happy day—the Snow and rain can not lessen my enjoyment—I arose chearfully and thanked a bountiful God—when my Son delivered me your affectionate Letter, which giveth a new zest to my delightful feelings—you intended to assuage the heart rending pangs of Sorrow—which had been already Soothed by a Sense of religion—by the noble example of my amiable Daughter in Law—who has learned...
My health has been so indifferent and the City is so flat since the adjourment of Congress that I cannot find materials for a Letter—It is difficult for me to say what the nature of my indisposition as the Doctor cannot ascertain it no more than myself but I believe general weakness and a slight attack of what they here call chills and fevers has been my chief complaint and the latentness and...
In my last I think I informed you that the news of this place was become so little interesting that my journal must cease added to which my health has become so unequal I am seldom well two days together—The last week we had a party of twenty at dinner consisting of Mr: & Mrs.Otis, Mr: Mason, Mr. & Mrs. Sears, Miss Perkins, Mr. & Mrs: Tucker of Virginia, Govr. & Mrs. Middleton of South...
I was then once more honoured with your affectionate favour of the 27th favour—from which I receive a fresh proof, that you do justice to my feelings, and perceive, how highly I value Such distinguished marks of your attention. I regard these indeed as one of the great blessings, which a kind Providence bestows on my chequered life, and for which I can never be too ardently thankful, could I...
It is long since I wrote you in consequence of a very severe indisposition which confined me to my bed ten days and to my chamber more than a fortnight—The time thus passed of course afforded but little to relate and still less to interest—On Tuesday evening 10 of March I drank Tea with Mrs. Sergeant a most charming woman, the Wife of a member of Congress from Philadelphia—It was a social...
Although I highly value the honour of your esteemed correspondence—even if it should be limited within the limits of a few lines, yet I receive a far higher gratification from the kind sentiments of friendship, and the unquestionable proofs of your good opinion, which you art pleased to bestow upon me. My only regret remains, that I can not reciprocate these—and that from my part, I often...
10 Mr Adams attended the funeral of Mr Astor’s grandson on arriving at Mr Astors the old Gentleman told him he had received a most urgent Letter from Mrs Bentzon begging that the body might be sent to her at New York and asked his advice what he should do on the melancholy occasion Mr Adams told him that considering all the circumstances he thought it would be best for him to indulge his...
I am very happy to find by your Letter of the 7th that you are kind enough to be satisfied with my efforts to amuse you I am generally obliged to write in so great a hurry that I cannot attend to elegance of style and I believe I cannot always boast of writing sense—I am only guided by the current of my thoughts which frequently flow too rappidly to be perfectly rational—If however they enable...
It is with high respect that I have the honor to assure you, you have mistaken my “Register” as well as its character , in attributing to it an offensive article about “ Drawing Rooms; ” while I have to regret that this is not the first time in which my secret pride has been humbled by a similar misapprehension. And such mistakes are easily committed, because another paper is published (at...
I was honored with your note, & have attended to it as I hope is in accordance to your will on the subject. I have suffered several times by such mistakes as are noticed in my printed reply; & the opportunity to vindicate myself was so happily presented that justice seemed to require that I should not pass it over. I disavow all connection with the party business of the past or present—&...
We came here in less than four hours. Found the riding much better than was expected & were not in the least incommoded by the rain. The Ply Stage was on wheels. We had Tea immediately after which Mr Hammatt left as being so anxious to join his family we could not persuad him to pass the night here. I find myself invigorated by the excursion, as is always the case after joining the society...
23d. received a note from Mrs. Monroe requiring my attendance at 1 oclock I went according to appointment and found Mrs. Monroe in her small Drawing Room ready to receive me—She opened the business by apologizing for the liberty she had taken but she really took such an interest ing in me that she had thought it right to speak to me on the subject of visiting and ettiquette She asked what was...
16 Went out to pay some visits and in the evening had a small party to Tea which consisted of my Sisters their husbands Mr & Mrs Walsh the Chevallier Corea Mr Pope & Mr Trimble & Mr Vail a protegie of Mr Crawfords. We had some conversation and a little Music; on the whole the evening was very dull— 17 This morning went out as usual to pay visits after a great deal of trouble and being in...
Jany 1 1818 The Circle was extremely crowded. On our arrival Mr. A was ushered into a room where the Presidents aid’s were in waiting, and I was introduced by the President who met me at door into the Circular Hall where Mrs. Monroe was seated with Mrs. Hay and Miss Gouverneur. She rose immediately and received me with much ease and affability; I was followed by the Ladies of the heads of...
My letters to my dear wife will have informed you of our arrival here: I sent several to her by the London Packet bound to Baltimore: there was a Boston ship near Portsmouth but she sailed before I could get any letters on board of her and I do not think she will arrive at this season of the year as soon as one farther South. I find my health improve (notwithstanding this damp climate) very...
Decbr. 15 A Stormy and bousterous day a large party invited to dine being the first Diplomatic dinner nothing to be had and the expence enormous no visitors and no news 16 In much distress about my dinner a french Cook very drunk & every thing in confusion at 1/2 past four the company assembled consisting of Mr. & Mrs. Bagot Mr & Mrs. de Neuville Mr Tencate Mr. Glenham Mr Hughes Mr. Antrobus...
I began to be quite uneasy at your long silence my and was much pleased to find by your Letter of the 12th that pleasure and not sickness was the cause of your delay in answering my last. I am very sorry to hear that Mrs de Wint health is weak and I agree with you in the opinion that she left home too early I hope however that when she returns and resumes her quiet mode of life that she will...
Your kind Letter of 15th. October was received by me on the 20th. from which time, the only possible choice that has been left me with regard to my employments has been what necessary act of duty I should postpone for the sake of attending others still more urgent. On that day (the 20th.) the President returned to the City.—There is a routine of the ordinary department business of the...
Had I not been honoured, So often; with proofs of your kindness, with which you was pleased to distinguish me among the numbers, who know, how to value the privilege of paying their homage to truth, I might deem an apologÿ necessarÿ for Sending a few insignificant lines from Philadelphia—From this point of view they would be considered by others—They may reallÿ be Stamped in this manner—your...
An alternation of six Stages, and six Steam-Boats finally landed us here yesterday afternoon, being the very day upon which I had promised to be here. The President had arrived here on Wednesday, and occupies the official mansion, where I had an interview with him last Evening—But the walls are fresh plaistered, and the wainscoting is new painted; and they render it so insalubrious for present...
Will you permit me at this late period to come before you with my congratulations on the return of your Son and his family to their native country, I have wish’d to do it ever since I heard of their arrival. I am almost ashamed to say, and yet it is the real reason Why I did not, that I feel such a diffidence in writing to you that I cannot conquer, and which induces me forego what I esteem...
We have arrived safely at this place after a fatiguing journey owing to the dust and extreme heat of the weather which nearly overcame me and produced so much fever by the time we reach’d New London we were apprehensive I should be incapable of proceeding as I found myself considerably better we took our passage in the Steam Boat at New London yesterday morning at 7. o-clock and reached New...