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I have spoken to one of the Providence Stage-coach Drivers; and upon the supposition that there will be, at least, two passengers besides yourself viz: your Son and a Maid Servant, if not a Man Servant also, and that the Coach must be at Braintree over night to take you early in the morning, if you shou’d choose to set off then, or, if it shou’d be more convenient to you, that you might order...
I am sorry that I did not know the President’s wishes, before the Receit of your Letter, to be a Purchaser of Thompson’s Island. One half of it only is owned by me, the other half by mr & mrs. Oliver of Salem. I had determined to part with my half; and two Persons have Appeared to make an Agreement for it. my Price is two thousand dollars for my part. one of the two persons is to give me an...
I wrote you from Worcester, which before this, I hope you have received. We lodged last night at Palmer, dined at Suffeild and arrived here this evening little after seven. We stopt a few moments at Windsor to see the Chief Justice—who says he enjoys better health at present, than he has for many years past. The Presidents old friend Mr. Trumbull was well enough to walk to the tavern and spend...
Being informed of your intention to stop in this Town on your way to the Southward, you will give great pleasure to Mrs. Marshall and my self by accepting a bed at our house, as we can accommodate you with convenience, & perhaps more agreeably than at a public house; and depending on the honor of seeing you / I am / Madam / Your most humble Sert MHi : Adams Papers.
We arrived at this place last evening about seven Oclock, where we have found most excellent accommodations. We have been highly favored with charming weather—excellent roads and good entertainment ever since we left you—find the chariot a much easier carriage than the coaches. The President thinks he never made so great a progress in his journey with so much ease to himself as the present. At...
We arrived on the 10th. I, much oppressed by one of my great Colds, which is now going off.—I could obtain only one little Room and one little bedroom but We can make a shift. I came here more loaded with Sorrow than with Rheum. Sally opened her Mind to me for the first time. I pitied her, I grieved, I mourned but could do no more. a Madman possessed of the Devil can alone express or...
After quite an agreeable journey we arrived at this place on the 10th inst. where we have found much better accommodations than we had any reason to expect. We are at present with two old maids Miss Barnes’s, who appear to be civil and obligeing—they have furnished the President with two rooms, a parlour handsomely furnished and a convenient bed chamber. The City is very much crouded at...
I Sent you a Letter this morning before I recd yours of the 13. from Brookfield. I rejoice that you had arrived so far and born your Journey so well: but the Weather has been so wet that I doubt whether you have been able to reach East Chester to day. I am more convinced that the Air is a great Repository of Diseases and that it is impossible to guard against them. Be always ready. Yet I now...
I hope you enjoy your health at this time & that it will be confirm’d to you & that your journey will be agreeable, and a happy meeting with the President, You will excuse the Liberty I take in requesting the favour of your influence with the President for the Office that Son Fitch Hall is desirous of obtaining I should be very happy if he could gett it, I wish him well & should be glad if he...
Your favors of the 5th: and 7th: currt. came in course, and I am much indebted to you for the disposition you made of the letters, which arrived, after my father’s departure. I have lately recd; several European letters & pamphlets & ought to have received another with the letter you enclosed me from Mr. Pitcairn, in which he desires particular respects to you. He acknowledges the receipt of...
I have written you but once since I bid you farewell. I was seized in Connecticutt with one of those direful Colds, which have sometimes brought my frame into danger and I was afraid to let you know how ill I was. I am now so much better as to be able to do Business. We have no News of you since the ninth indeed since the Note in which you told us of James’s fever. The Weather has given us...
I was very glad to hear by the Letter you sent me from Brookfield that you had got safely so far. the week proved so stormy & disagreable—I was affraid I should hear you were sick. This week has been in general so pleasant excepting one day very windy that I hope you are safe at East Chester this evening, & that the President is recover’d from his cold, your children well & the sweet Caroline...
I have no line from you, since the 13th at Brookfield. There has been so much rainy weather as to have made travelling impracticable for you, some part of the time, and the roads disagreable at all times.—If your health fails not, Patience will bear the rest. We went to the Presbyterian Church yesterday and heard Mr Grant a young calvinistical Presbyterian of a good style and fair hopes....
Your favour of the 20th has been to Phyladelphia and came back to me only last night: nor was this the fault of the Post Office—The Letter was addressed to Phyladelphia. It gave me great Joy and relieved me from much anxiety. I had recd. no news of you since your Letter of 13 from Brookfield. We had a sharp frost last night. Ice this morning on a Tub of water at the Door, a quarter of an Inch...
I am favoured this morning with yours of the 23d.—This is Accession day you know. I shall always consider it as a red Letter day: a fortunate day. I am happy to know that you are comfortably situated. I pray you to live in all Things at your own Expence and be no Burthen to Mrs. Smith or the Lt. Col. I am pretty well recovered of my Cold, but it has reduced my flesh. James Has found a...
I have recd yours of 24th and thank you for your relation of our little domestic affairs at Quincy. Brisler did not arrive last night as you callculated. His Children may detain him longer than you expected.—Some of the public Offices are about removing to Phyladelphia this Week. I can Send James with my Horses and Charriot to meet you at Hoebucken Ferry or Elizabeth Town or any other Place...
I have yours of 26 by Brisler and that of the 28th. this Morning. Thomas is in Phyladelphia and Brisler with his Family are going off this morning in the Stage. He will write me this Evening or tomorrow.—I expect to hear from you when and where you intend to Set out, and where you intend to be.—The offices of Treasury & State are gone to Phyladelphia. War, Navy & Law remain here, for...
Your favor of the 28th inst I this morning had the pleasure to receive and for which my best thanks are due you. With this you will receive a letter from Mr T. Adams received last evening—I think the probability is that he will be with us this Afternoon. The Chief Justice and Govenor Davie have both left this place for New port where Captain Barrey is waiting to receive them and to carry them...
I have the Pleasure of hearing of your Arrival at East Chester and in Health. Since You left Quincy, We have scarcely had a Storm, except that which occur’d on your Journey. The Weather has proved favourable for Farming Business and for finishing the Cellar, which will probably be compleated this Week as far as was intended, th’o not in all its Parts as was directed by Brizler, the Part next...
I receiv’d your kind Letter of the 18th yesterday and am glad to find you able to receive so much company tho I fear it will not be advantagous to your nightly repose I was in Boston last Week and find the appointment of the Envoys is growing to be a very popular action some extracts from Joel Barlows Letters have made the appointment appear an act of wisdom—these extracts were in John Russels...
Your favors of the 19th & 22d I have recd. no Vessell at present is up for Phila.a. If any one offers, I will endeavour to procure the articles you wish to be sent. it is now so late in the season, that I do not expect I shall forward them— I am much oblig’d to you for the papers you inclos’d. such Mad Men, as Cooper can never do any injury to the Government. Their mad zeal, defeats their own...
I feel an inclination to write you every Week athough I have nothing new to inform you of I know you are as interested as I am in know the result of the present negotiation about Mr. Whitney. We have so far gone on very smoothly. The committee met as I told you they were to—nine of them—Mr. Cranch Mr Black, Capt. Beal Mr Spear & Cary; these were the old ones who invited Mr Whitney. To these...
I yesterday reciev’d your Letter of Decm. 4th with the Presidents Speech. We had seen and admir’d it before. I have not heard any one speak of it but with approbation. I am sure some of our Feds must feel asham’d of themselves. Will they never learn to trust where they have plac’d confidence? I hope my Sister We shall keep out of the Fire but I have my fears the President must not be Weary of...
Mr: Cranch has taken the liberty to address a short letter to the President containing a desire to be tho’t of in the Various appointments now making in the line of his business—as he did not chuse to trouble the President with any details—embolden’d by your known condescention I have taken the pen to observe that since Mr Cranch’s letter to my Uncle relative to the Armory at Harpers Ferry...
The sudden & unexpected Death of the illustrious Washington has excited universal Mourning, Weeping & Lamentation. On this solemn Occasion Mr Norton Yesterday in the afternoon gave us a very pertinent Discourse from 2d. Samuel 3d C. 38. V. “And the King said unto his Servants, Know ye not, that there is a Prince and a great Man fallen in Israel”? This Loss is considered as irreparable. To find...
I take up my pen to mingle with you and Mrs. Adams the feelings of our Great Affliction for the Death of General Washington. A better Man and a Greater General never lived. I have lost a real And Sincere friend who would protect Me. I now look up to you Sir to protect me in my rights and from knowing you here I shall feel the Influence of your Protection. Since I had the Honour of Seeing you...
Accept the thanks of a heart opprest with sorrow but greatfull for your friendly sympathising letter. To that almighty power who alone can heal the wounds he inflicts I look for consolation and fortitude May you long very long enjoy the happiness you now possess and never know affliction like mine With prayers for your happiness / I remain your sincear / Friend NNPM .
I hope you will pardon the liberty I take in addressing you in this way but the fear that my Vebal respects might from the multiplicity of my good fathers cares be forgoten must be my apology for offering you thus the Condolence and Compliments of the Season. I have heard with much pleasure that you are in the injoyment of health be assured that you have my best wishes that every blessing may...
I am very much mortified that I have Sent so many Letters to you burthen’d with Postage I thought mr cranch had frank’d them all by his name on the Letters as well as on the Post Bill—he thought the later was Sufficient I will take care for the future that they Shall be directed right I have reciev’d yours of the 18th & 22d of December there solemn subject has engross’d the thoughts &...
I recieved my dear and ever honoured Aunt your kind Letter of Decr 18th and the Cape accompanying it, for both which I feel myself greatly obliged, and beg you to accept my thanks. I am glad to hear from Mama that your health is better than it was the last winter. I hope the mildness of the season will assist in confirming it. I never remember finer weather in Decr, and Jany. than we have had—...
How often do we find that having much to say, the full heart cannot impart the half. This evil I find extends to epistolary writing, for having many incidents crouding upon each other, I thought I had not time to notice them as I ought, & so have communicated nothing. But as the occurrences of my own Family, are what can only be very interesting to you, I will tell you that our numerous little...
I have receiv’d two Letters from you since I wrote last, one contain’d the Border & Lace for my Cape & a cap for mrs Norton, for which We thank you. mrs Greenleaf also for hers—How you do love to dress up your Friends! There is certainly more pleasure in it than in adorning our own Person! We cant wear our Blue ribbons yet. We are all in mourning—not a person in our meeting house but has some...
I should have answer’d your valued Letter of 27th. ulto., by Mr. Shaw, if his stay would have admited of it—but the whole day he was with us was spent in viewing the City and the public buildings &c—I hope he was pleased with them, although he saw them to the greatest disadvantage, on account of the wintry appearance of things, and the badness of the roads. It gave me extreme pain to hear,...
I sincerely symphire with you in the very great bereavement the Whole community has mett with in the Death of the Great & Good General Washington, such a Character is worthy of immation & I hope his last Legacy will every be in remembrance with every one that they may act as friends to their Countrys good. You my dear friend, must feel it more sensibly as you had the pleasure & happiness of...
In conversation with the President, as he passed to the seat of Government, I mentioned to him my fears respecting the continuation of the new levies raised during the subsisting difference with France, And my desire, that my son Charles Hunt a Leut: in the 14 Regimt. should be transposed to one of the former, or first raised Regiments to ensure his continuance in the Army, which appears to be...
I have to thank you for two Letters which lay by me unanswer’d, I have had my hands full of business & my Head of care & one of my hoarse colds to trouble me besides. mr Cranch is still confin’d with his, but I hope will not be quite sick, on the ordination day I could not speak loud enough to be heard & was very much oppress’d at my Lungs, but I could not spare myself. I had the House full of...
A few days ago, I received your favour of 30. December of the last year; after a long interval during which I had not heard from you; and the communication with England from Hamburg having been for six weeks interrupted by the severity of the season, I was nearly the whole of that time without receiving any information from America—When it came at last, it was in one respect, of a nature...
I have not written you so often as I wish’d to do for these several weeks. I have not been free from company since ordination: our house has been like a Tavern. Last week I receiv’d your kind present by General Lincoln for which I most Sincerely thank you. tis very pretty, & very delicate muslin—mrs Smith sent me the little Gown for a pattern to make it by. I like the Form all but the apron &...
I inclose you Mr. Ames’s Oration deliver’d before the Legislature. Yesterday agreable to the recommendation of Co n gress was devoted to religious worship. Business was suspended and I never knew; a public Fast observed more seriously. all the Houses for Public worship were open in the Morning for prayers & solemn musick. the General Court attending at Brattle Street. Dr. Thacher deliver’d the...
Your last of Jany 9th. I receiv’d with the enclosure, since that very little has been heard off but Processions, Funeral Elogies, Orations & Discourses on the Death of Genl. Washington. Indeed it has been carried to an Excess, in some Instances too much bordering on Idolatry and been attended with an enormous Expence of Time—Had one Day every where been devoted to a public Expression of Grief...
I have been honoured by your Letter of the 18th—I have noticed its Contents, I consent to your wishes, and I will smother my own, if my heart cracks—My Idea of happiness rests on the ability properly exercised—to promote the happiness of others, whenever I am furnished with this ability I exercise it, and consider myself obliged by the oportunity, I have written to Mrs. Smith, & you will...
Permit me to introduce to you my particular friend Mr. Hardy of newyork, he visits Philadelphia, as a Candidate for public office—highly recommended—I have broke in upon my general rule and have taken the Liberty to give him a Letter to The President to which permit me to refer you, Mr. Hardy’s merits as an officer, and Conduct as a Gentleman, entitle him to civilities and attention. permit me...
disappointment seems to be written upon all the exertions my dear Son makes to establish himself in any way to Support his Family & rise in the world. it may not always be So—his Struggles may Some time hence be crown’d with success—by his late applications he has been brought into view & may not be forgotten in the new arrangments my advise to him has been not to neglect any thing which...
Yours of the 21st. Ulto. and the 6th. Inst. came to hand Yesterday with $200 enclos’d, this Day have given orders to Mr Bates to proceed, with all Dispatch—he says You left undecided the Dimensions of the lower Room of the proposed Addition—27 by 20 was mentiond, but whether of that or less Dimensions he is uncertain—The Height also of the Room is wanted—How much is to be dropd from the Level...
There is a great deal of pain; taken to make mischief between you & Mr & Mrs. Porter Many wish for his birth but I am confident no one who has offer’d would take better care of your things in the house or to Whom you could trust them with equal satefy. James Howard is very busy & very abusive, told mr. cranch that he heard Mr Porter was going, & that it was time he should—he loved his tricks....
Mrs: Smith is playing with Caroline and having wrote yesterday, says I must introduce The Bearer—Brigade Major Coxe of the 12th. Regt. to the drawing room—he visits Philadelphia on Furlough, proposing to spend a few day’s there, Should he be there on a drawing room, day, permit his admittance, and be pleased to let Mr. Shaw to be attentive to him for the sake of his gout . he is entitled to...
I donnot like to let a week pass without writing a few Lines to let you know how we are & what we are about. as to your House if the winter holds on at the rate it has done since March came in it will not be very soon done. we had for two days past a violent storm of rain snow & hail, & tis now very cold. Judge cushing is not yet arriv’d at least I have not heard of them & I think I should if...
I wrote to You the 14th. Inst. acknowledging the Receipt of Yours of Feby. 21. & the 6th. of this month. I have conferred with Mr. Porter and his Wife relative to their Continuance on the Farm for 7 Months—I cannot bring mr. Porter to a less Sum than 175 Dollrs for that Term, which is 25 Dollars more than you mentiond, altho it appears to me that it would upon the whole be better to give that...
Your sisterly kindness to me my dear Madam induces me to believe that to hear of our welfare will not be uninteresting to you. We were blessed with fine weather every day until the last from Newhaven here when the wind at NE produced a violent snow storm that night (the 20 of Febry) & the next day, when we considered ourselves very fortunate beings in arriving here before it took place. The...
A Letter which I had a long time wished for, I at length received from my affectionate Sister. Every day I had been thinking I would write. But the round of duties that called for my unremitted exertions; left me too weary, or too inert to take up my Pen, for the company which our Boarders attract, demand polite & respectful attentions from me, by their own obliging behaviour— And I thought...