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    • Shaw, William Smith
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    • Adams, Abigail Smith

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Saturday April 21st, I received yours of the 9th. I wrote to you the 1st. of April in answer to yours of March 20th, which before this you must have received, and shall always esteem my letters of inestimable value, so long as they purchase yours. The excellent pamphlet you sent me I thank you. The sentiment it contains—the spirit with which it is written prove to me, that the author possesses...
I have just finished Professor Robinson’s history of a conspiracy, against all the religions & governments of the world, and have laid it aside to answer your’s of June 2d, received the 9th. I have read this book, my aunt, with attention—have seen societies formed, whose object, under the guise of promoting general good has been to abolish all religions & government. I have seen this & am...
O how happy should I be, were I to sit down to write you of my dear sisters better health, but alas I cannot. She fails every day & has now grown so weak that she is not able to writte out or even to come below stairs. She still keeps her usual flow of spirits, & she sits “like patience on a monument, smiling” even tho in the arms of death. How miserable should I be, my aunt, in seeing my dear...
I have a thousand things to tell you and but a few minutes to write. We arrived in this city Fryday Evening about seven O clock—the first week we had most beautiful weather & found the roads most excellent—the President said he never knew them to be so good but the snow made them as bad as they were before good. We had not been in the house but a few minutes before his Excellency the Govenor...
I received your letter of the 18 of Nov last Wednesday. The president received yours of the 22d yesterday & of the 25 this morning—They have made us quite happy to see in what excellent spirits you are and to hear of your better health. I read Barlows letter to the president at Springfield. There can be no doubts of its authenticity. Mr Thatcher of Massachusetts said that Mr. who brought from...
We are all well and only want you and cousen L here to make us very happy. Saturday twelve O clock the president delivered his speech & spoke it so distinctly that I do not believe there was a single word but what was distincly heard all over the house ‘though it was very crouded. The president has had something such an inflamation on his right cheek as he had last summer before he went to the...
The president received two letters the latest dated 3d of Dec from you last Evening with a letter inclosed for your son at Berlin which, I shall superscribe and deliver to Mr. Pickering with your respects with a great deal of pleasure. I am very sorry to see that you were not so well as you were when you wrote the 25th of Nov. You do not write in half so good spirits. I find Mr Otis’s family...
I send you this morning besides the usual number of papers, one from Newburyport containeing a good letter signed W, addressed to Joel Barlow. For two or three days past we have had very excellent slaying but a great rain yesterday has destroyed it almost all—At Quincy I suspect the snow is a foot or two deep on a level. There are a great many of the members absent of congress still absent. Mr...
I received your letter of Dec 9th, with all that pleasure and satisfaction, which, the news of your better health could not but excite— I declare I wish you would have, Aunt, a wedding every night in the week, for I plainly see that it gives you better spirits and consequently better health, than all the medicine in the world. I have not seen the president so happy this some time, for as he...
I have long been wishing to find time to give my aunt a history of the visit of Dr. Logan to the president, the monday after we arrived in the city. He began by saying that he was extremely sorry that we are not to have the pleasure of Mrs Adams company this winter in this city. The president thanked him. He then said, that he had just come from France and that he had the pleasure to inform...
Notwithstanding my arms are so stiff, that I can scarcely move them, occasioned by cutting venson for twenty eight very hungry men, yet I must write a few lines to my aunt, before I sleep. We were made very happy this morning by the receipt of your letter of the twenty tenth of Dec to the president. You do not say a single word, whether you have received the newspapers, which I have sent you...
I received your letter of the 14th of Dec by this mornings mail, but not any newspaper as you mention. Judge Dana’s address I have read with great pleasure in the price current, which Russels sends to the president regularly. I observed in the same paper some extracts from Southy’s poems, with which, I was very much pleased—they are very descriptive and elegant. Dexter has just arrived after...
The president received your letter of Saturday the eigth or ninth 15th or 16th of Dec, in which you discover a very great anxiety for the president’s health, arising from what you saw in the newspapers, by this mornings mail. I wanted to fly to my dear aunt, on the wings of the wind, to inform her of our perfect health and happines. If there were not such blundering postmasters as there are I...
Not a single letter have we received from you since Monday. Uncle sighs and says, I wish Aunt would write oftener and I sigh and say, Ah! if she knew half the happiness her letters gave to us, I am sure she would write every day in the week. Congress debates have been warm and interesting for two days past on Mr. Griswolds motion respecting punishing interferences in the government &c. but it...
‘Though I have been writing a very long letter, to my wild, random, laughter loving Walter and have made it very late, still I want to thank my aunt for her letter of Dec 20th received yesterday morning before I sleep. Logan is chosen Representative for this State by a very large majority. It so happened that the day L took his seat, a new carpet was placed on the floor of the house. The...
I received yours of the 29 Dec. yesterday morning. By the same mail we received the accounts of the defeat of Buonaparte, which made every good man very happy. Peter says in his paper of yesterday, that he “was just thinking! of something to present to the caitiffs of French Faction for a new years gift—something to shake their gall bladders, something to sting their souls, when he heard of...
I have seldom known it to be colder at the Eastward than it is here at present. Although I have a very large fire & my desk almost into it, still my fingers ache & the ink scarcely runs from the pen. I sent you a few days since Logan’s address, attempting, like his brother traitors, to vindicate his conduct. Thus did Arnold, Munroe & Randolph and thus do all traitors. “If their purgation did...
So far I have written this half hour, but I have a bad head ache, & the spirit doth not moveth me to write. Although I have nothing to entertain or amuse you still as I have begun I am resolved to finish the letter. In thus doing I do but follow the example of many celebrated poets and philosophers who have written, not letters only, but volumes, on nothing. I have read in the Centinel with...
I have received your letters of Jan 3d & 6th with all that pleasure & gratitude which so much good counsel deserved. I do love to read your letters. Before this reaches you, you must have heard of Cousen Thomas’s arrival at N York, from whence he wrote to you. He arrived in this city this afternoon, & is very well. It would do you good to see how happy it has made Uncle. I wish Aunt was here....
I am almost dead with a horrid cold and fear that before I shall half finish this letter I shall drown it with water, from my eyes. I wish I felt well and in good spirits enough to give you an account of the presidents ball—It was brilliant indeed, and the ladies were drest and looked almost too beautiful. The president enjoyed himself much better, than he would have done, had not Cousen...
I have sat down to enclose to you the dispatches of Mr. Gerry—The Secy’s report I will send you when published. It will not be relished by the Jacobins. I have lately been reading a most enchanting poem called Joan of Arc by a Mr Southey. It has some faults in respect to its diction and versification but not withstanding these blemishes, it abounds in beauties and excellencies of the highest...
Mr Adams left us yesterday morning for New York. He expects his business will detain him till monday, when he will set out for Quincy. I shall miss his company very much. I have read Mr. Gerry’s communications to Congress over and over again. The directory French government, in these last dispatches, displays in the most captivating manner, the charming pictures of candor, frankness and...
There is a class of men in this country, possessing some public confidence, but entirely destitute of any moral principle, whose whole lives are spent in the prostitution of their talents to the perversion of reason—whose unceasing endeavors are to mislead the public mind—to obstruct public business and by the aid of cavil, misrepresentation and artificial odium, to deprive the government of...
Saturday I was made very happy by the receipt of your letter of the 25th of January. I wish I could send you Guillotina but having not been published in any of the newspapers beside the “Connecticut Courant” I dont think it will be in my power to send it you. My cold is much better but the weather changes so often here, as soon as I get little better, I renew it.— The inclosed arreté of the...
Yours of the 2d of Feb. I received this morning—The president says he cannot blame you for not writing oftner but because you write two to him to his one, but could he write as freely as you can and had he as much leisure he should write you every day. Last Evening we went to the play. Secrets worth knowing & the children in the woods constituted the entertainment. The plays were good but the...
I have just received your letter of the 8th of Feb. and feel grieved to find you in so low spirits and so unwell, but flatter myself that the sight of your son (whom I hope has long before this happily arrived) & his excellent company will revive your spirits and restore your health. The snow has almost entirely left us and we have had some days of the past week as pleasant and warm as we have...
With this I send you two more copies of the dispatches—A defence of the Alien & sedition bills Divernois letter, Giffords address to the Loyal association &c the pamphlet setting forth the pernicious effects of stage plays. The last mentioned pamphlet was sent to the president the night after he went to the theatre and another quaker sent two more the Evening after.—they are grieved to the...
I received your letter of the 14th of Feb. yesterday—I enclosed to you this morning Browns paper containing the report of the committee, to whom was referred the Report of the committee the petitions &c requesting the repeal of the Alien & Sedition bills &c. It was drawn up by Mr. Goodrich of Cont. and is a most masterly production. I think you must be pleased with it. The report was made the...
I wrote you from Worcester, which before this, I hope you have received. We lodged last night at Palmer, dined at Suffeild and arrived here this evening little after seven. We stopt a few moments at Windsor to see the Chief Justice—who says he enjoys better health at present, than he has for many years past. The Presidents old friend Mr. Trumbull was well enough to walk to the tavern and spend...
We arrived at this place last evening about seven Oclock, where we have found most excellent accommodations. We have been highly favored with charming weather—excellent roads and good entertainment ever since we left you—find the chariot a much easier carriage than the coaches. The President thinks he never made so great a progress in his journey with so much ease to himself as the present. At...