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I have received your letter of the 31st of August by Captain Brownson. I saw in an American Paper that Grandpapa has been on board the Seventy four which is in the command of Commadore Bainbrige and thought it a very fine Ship and and am in hopes of having a great many more by my return. I do not like England near so well as America nor do I think I should like any country so well as my native...
Know all Men by these Presents, that We John Adams of Quincy in the County of Norfolk and Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Esquire, and Abigail Adams his Wife, In consideration of one Dollar to each of us paid by John Quincy Adams of Boston in the County of Suffolk & Commonwealth of Massachusetts aforesaid Esquire, the Receipt whereof We do hereby acknowledge and for diverse other good and...
Saturday night 9 O Clock and not before I recd yours of 13th. and the Letter to Thomas with it, brought here no doubt by mistake. I regret very much that you have not a Gentleman with you. The Skittish young Colt with you, is always timorous, but no harm will befall you or her I trust. The Weather and roads here, on Saturday Sunday and to day are the finest We have seen this year. The Election...
I recd last night your Letter of the 11th. Your Girls and Mr Shipley arrived in good health and Spirits. I shall Send the Charriot this morning to meet you. It would be a great pleasure to me to go in it, but I am so engaged in indispensable business that I know not how to leave it and another thing of Some importance is your Son may take a Seat with you & Suzan in the Charriot and that will...
We arrived here last night, or rather yesterday at one o Clock and here we dined and Slept. The Building is in a State to be habitable. And now we wish for your Company. The Account you give of the melancholly State of our dear Brother Mr Cranch and his family is really distressing and must Severely afflict you. I most cordially Sympathize with you and them. I have Seen only Mr Marshall and Mr...
I recd your favour of the 2d by Mr. Dexter and this morning from Mr. Gerry an account of your health on the 4th. which have relieved me from some anxiety as I had recd no Letter from you since you were in N. York. I have seen many Cities and fine Places since you left me and particularly Mount Vernon. Mrs Washington and her whole Family very kindly enquired after your health and all your...
I wrote you this morning, But was not particular. It will be Six or Seven days before that or this can reach you. When you write me afterwards you may direct your Letters to remain at the Post Office at New Haven or Hartford or perhaps New York. I shall Sett out on my Journey northward on Monday the 16th at latest, but shall not ride more than twenty miles a day. I expect it will take me 30...
I have yours of 26 by Brisler and that of the 28th. this Morning. Thomas is in Phyladelphia and Brisler with his Family are going off this morning in the Stage. He will write me this Evening or tomorrow.—I expect to hear from you when and where you intend to Set out, and where you intend to be.—The offices of Treasury & State are gone to Phyladelphia. War, Navy & Law remain here, for...
I have recd yours of 24th and thank you for your relation of our little domestic affairs at Quincy. Brisler did not arrive last night as you callculated. His Children may detain him longer than you expected.—Some of the public Offices are about removing to Phyladelphia this Week. I can Send James with my Horses and Charriot to meet you at Hoebucken Ferry or Elizabeth Town or any other Place...
I am favoured this morning with yours of the 23d.—This is Accession day you know. I shall always consider it as a red Letter day: a fortunate day. I am happy to know that you are comfortably situated. I pray you to live in all Things at your own Expence and be no Burthen to Mrs. Smith or the Lt. Col. I am pretty well recovered of my Cold, but it has reduced my flesh. James Has found a...
Your favour of the 20th has been to Phyladelphia and came back to me only last night: nor was this the fault of the Post Office—The Letter was addressed to Phyladelphia. It gave me great Joy and relieved me from much anxiety. I had recd. no news of you since your Letter of 13 from Brookfield. We had a sharp frost last night. Ice this morning on a Tub of water at the Door, a quarter of an Inch...
I have no line from you, since the 13th at Brookfield. There has been so much rainy weather as to have made travelling impracticable for you, some part of the time, and the roads disagreable at all times.—If your health fails not, Patience will bear the rest. We went to the Presbyterian Church yesterday and heard Mr Grant a young calvinistical Presbyterian of a good style and fair hopes....
I have written you but once since I bid you farewell. I was seized in Connecticutt with one of those direful Colds, which have sometimes brought my frame into danger and I was afraid to let you know how ill I was. I am now so much better as to be able to do Business. We have no News of you since the ninth indeed since the Note in which you told us of James’s fever. The Weather has given us...
I Sent you a Letter this morning before I recd yours of the 13. from Brookfield. I rejoice that you had arrived so far and born your Journey so well: but the Weather has been so wet that I doubt whether you have been able to reach East Chester to day. I am more convinced that the Air is a great Repository of Diseases and that it is impossible to guard against them. Be always ready. Yet I now...
We arrived on the 10th. I, much oppressed by one of my great Colds, which is now going off.—I could obtain only one little Room and one little bedroom but We can make a shift. I came here more loaded with Sorrow than with Rheum. Sally opened her Mind to me for the first time. I pitied her, I grieved, I mourned but could do no more. a Madman possessed of the Devil can alone express or...
I cannot say when I shall be able to sett out. But I shall loose no time here. When the Public Business is in such a state that I can leave it, I shall go, be the Roads as they may.... I expect bad travelling all the way. Trenton has indeed taken the Insurgent. But we have a silly Insurgence in Northampton County in this State, which will detain me, I suppose, some days. This State is not a...
I have been so overwhelmed with Business at the Close of the session of Congress and Since, that I have not been able to write you for several Days. Mr Grove desired me to tell you that Mr William Smith your Nephew is married to a very amiable young Lady the Daughter of a rich Father. What he means by a rich Father I dont know.—I congratulate you & Louisa on this Event. I cannot say whether I...
I have just recd yours of 14th.—it has laid in the Post office I suppose since saturday. The subjects of Mr J. Q. A.s Agents are horrible to me. I will therefore dismiss them. Thomas’s Predilection for Phyladelphia, I suppose will determine him.—Alass! Nelly is married poor Boy! and I suppose some of the Six sisters will catch the Child in the Trap without a Groat and without Connections! This...
I went last night to the Ball, where the Company Suffered more by the cold which was excessive than I ever knew any Company Suffer in my Life. The Dancers only were comfortable. I came home and went into a warm bed and had a fine Perspiration, occasioned I believe by my drinking three Glasses of Madeira Wine at supper and two more after I came home, which has relieved me from all cold and I...
Your last Letter, which I have recd was dated the 10th.—I have one from Mr Thomas at Brookfield of the 8th.—I hope your ill turn was soon over and that your health is reestablished. What the ultimate determination of our Son will be I cannot conjecture.—I would not overpersuade him. Phyladelphia is on many Accounts, a good place. My Inclination as well as yours is for Quincy: his for...
I am grieved beyond measure at your returned indisposition: but hope it will not be long. Your sons arrival I hope will raise your Spirits and give you strength. To Day I find the Weather pleasant and must take a Walk.—Mrs Cushing hopes to see you in a month. The Court rises tomorrow. I am afraid I cannot see you so soon. I shall have Business enough after Congress is up. Forreign affairs,...
I have just recd. yours of Feb. 1. and thank you for the Book. We had one before, from the Bookseller here who has them for Sale. Dr. Tufts may draw. You had better engage the Oats. French may have Belchers place. Congress will not Sitt longer than March: and I calculate upon Weeks too—But fear I shall be detained sometime after Congress departs. Last night I must needs go to the Play and had...
Yours of 25 Ult. is received. Thomas is to Sett off from N York to day from for Quincy and I wish him a pleasant Journey, which the fine Weather and convenient Snow promises. An happy Sight of his Friends, will come of course, without Accidents. He found his Father, forty Years Older than when he left him, and if he finds his Mother advanced only ten, it may be an agreable disappointment to...
On Tuesday Mr T. B. Adams left Us at Eleven in the stage for New York & Boston and consequently Quincy.—I should have been glad to have held him till I could carry him with me: but I thought it my Duty to comply with his desire, both for his sake and yours.—He Seems determined to settle in Phyladelphia.—He would have a happier Life, and be a more important Man in Quincy: But I must do & say as...
If I had the Logodiarrhea, you would hear from me oftener than you do. When Thomas leaves me, which will be some day this Week, I shall be more Solitary in my own Judgment than ever. But I must let him go to see you, both to gratify him and cure you. After he shall have been some time at Quincy I hope to hear that your health is quite established. He seems determined to settle in Phyladelphia...
In my solitude in Markett street, I find nothing so sociable as your Letters—those of 18 & 20th. are this moment recd.—Your health & Spirits are a great Improvement of mine. I have avoided the Epithets perfidious and unprincipled as much as I could, but neither they nor any that could be borrowed from the Hebrew & the Greek would be too strong, for the House of Mass to Use.— My Religion you...
I am as much of a Solitudinarian as Frederick the Conqueror. He was constantly Saying at Sixty Je Suis vieux, cassé, Surannée &c &c &c I may Say the Same and have the honor to resemble him in this particular: But I shall never imitate his Idolatry for Voltaire. His Materialism appears to me very Superficial. He insists upon being all matter, without knowing what matter is. The Monades, the...
I have been very happy, with our Thomas Since his Arrival: He runs about with his black head and blue Coat among his old Quaker Aquaintances, who all accost him in the friendly style “Thomas how dost thee do?” He Seems inclined to Settle in Phyladelphia: but will not determine till he goes to Quincy and makes Inquiries there.—I have laid before him Quincy & Phyladelphia with their Advantages...
Yesterday, Tuesday when the Levee Room began to be thin Brisler came running in, with the delightful Sounds “Sir, Mr. Adams is up Stairs.” I was not long in mounting the escalier and had the high Pleasure of embrasing my dear son Thomas after an Absence of four Years & an half.—We had a very happy Evening and he has had a real nights rest after the fatigues of his Voyage & Journey. He seems in...
I thank God it is now in my power to give you the pleasure you desired of receiving from me a chearful Letter. This Moment they brought me from the Post Office a Letter from our dear Thomas dated the 12 informing me of his Arrival at New York. He will come on to Phyladelphia and only laments that he cannot have the pleasure of embracing both his Parents at once. His Passage has not been...