Search help
Documents filtered by: Recipient=""
Results 1-50 of 176 sorted by date (descending)
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
Front March 27 1836. Forwarded for the Lawrville Lyceum at the request in its name, of a Book from my library, and as a token of the respect I feel for an Institute patronizing youthful talent Back to the youth of a free country < >, on a subject particularly adap< > Fragment (NjMoHP) .
a paper prepared by Mr. Madison a short time before his death, in which he re-examined the question of the power to establish a Bank—written in consequence of its having been represented, that his signature of the Bank bill proceeded from a change of opinion on his part, of the constitutional power of Congress on that subject— Ms (fragment) (ViU) .
Sovereignty It has hitherto been understood, that the supreme power, that is, the sovereignty of the people of the States, was in its nature divisible; and was in fact divided, according to the Constitution of the U. States, between the States in their United, and the States in their individual capacities that as the States in their highest sov. char. were compent to a surrender of yr whole...
A sketch never finished nor applied. As the weakness and wants of man naturally lead to an association of individuals, under a Common Authority, whereby each may have the protection of the whole against danger from without, and enjoy in safety within, the advantages of social intercourse, and an exchange of the necessaries & comforts of life; in like manner feeble communities, independent of...
Altho’ the Legislature of Virginia at a late Session declared almost unanimously, that South Carolina was not supported in her doctrine of nullification by the Resolutions of 1798 it appears that those Resolutions are still appealed to as expressly or constructively favoring the doctrine. That the doctrine of nullification may be clearly understood, it must be taken as laid down in the Report...
I James Madison of Orange county do make this my last Will and testament, hereby revoking all Wills by me heretofore made. I devise to my dear Wife during her life, the tract of land whereon I live, as now held by me, except as herein otherwise devised; and if she shall pay the sum of nine thousand dollars within three years after my death, to be distributed as herein after directed, then I...
Altho’ the Legislature of Virginia declared at a late Session almost unanimously, that S. Carolina was not supported in her doctrine of nullification by the Resolutions of 1798, it appears that those Resolutions are still appealed to as expressly or constructively favoring the doctrine That the doctrine of nullification may be clearly understood, it must be taken as laid down in the Report of...
Having alluded to the Supreme Court of the U. S. as a Constitutional resort in deciding questions of Jurisdiction between the U. S. and the individual States a few remarks may be proper shewing the sense and degree in which that character is more particularly ascribed to that Department of the Govt. As the Legislative, Executive & Judicial Departments of the U. S. are co-ordinate, and each...
Deposit 5400 + 600 (check every Memorandum of checks drawn on the Bank of Fredericksburg on the fund recd. from Mr Taylor. No. 1. fav. of W. Allen $1500 2. J. C. Payne 400 3. E. Coles.....2050 octb 4. J. Ballard & Co. ..... 200 10 5. Js. Shepherd ..... 80 10 6. Eras: T. Rose .... 250 17. 7 Docr. Grymes ..... 15 20. 8. D & M. Cutts ... 45 31. 9. Jas. Cowherd .... 1047 Nov 11. 20. Peter Gray...
Being satisfied from observation and experience, as well as from medical testimony, that ardent spirit as a drink, is not only needless, but hurtful; and that entire disuse of it would tend to promote the health, the virtue and happiness of the community, we hereby express our conviction, that would the citizens of the United States, and especially the Young Men , discontinue the use of it,...
Office of the Colonization Society This certifies that the Hon. Daniel Waldo is a Member for life, of the American Colonization Society. (MWA) .
To be revised & follow if necessary the publication of the letters. The public will decide how far it was becoming in Mr T. on the floor of the Senate where he represented the State of Virga. with <...> evidence before him, to Charge G. W. &ca. with a* design &c. *examine the Report in the Newspapers And Mr. T. himself, will decide how far it was just or candid, to disregard the disproofs of...
A quorum of the Board was not formed untill Friday, July 12th. when John H. Cocke & Joseph C. Cabell appeared and took their seats. A communication from Mr. Madison, Rector was received, apprising the board of his inability to attend their session; whereupon Joseph C. Cabell was elected Rector pro tempore. The following committees were then appointed, viz Of Inspection; Messrs. Cabell, Cocke,...
Notes on Virginia Resolutions more [ ] (all the powers [ ] for one the = one for all [ ] from Resoln. 3d Strike out "[ ] actively and not instead one of the nullifying [ ] With the word retained its substance is taken away by the Keny. [ ] 9th. Resoln. & compleatly annihilated by the Explanatory Rept. of 99 _____________ The ratifying clause of the Virga. may [ ] by people of the U. S., all of...
I must plead a lapse of 50 years as an apology for not recollecting in my answer to yours on the subject of the Lands ceded by Virginia to the U.S. that a vindication of her title wd. be found in the secret Journals of Congress— It appears there under the head of "facts & observations", but had been prepared by the Virga. Delegates & put into the form of direct instructions from Congress to...
I have recd. Sir, your letter of the 3d: Mr. Harding in an error in supposing it my intention to pay the debts of J. P. Todd., of which you will please to apprize him. Your Professional Agency in making the application needed no apology.   I thank you Sir for the kind language expressed in relation to myself and beg you to accept my respects & my good wishes RC (MHi : Law School Library).
July 11—The Board met. Present James Breckenridge, Joseph C. Cabell, William H. Broadnax, and Thomas J. Randolph. John H. Cocke appeared and took his seat at the Board during the day. The Board was organized by calling General Breckenridge to the Chair. There having been a new appointment of Visitors by the Executive of the State since the last meeting in obedience to the act of Assembly...
thinks it more desirable than probable that on discussing the urgent case of S. C, abstract questions may be avoided; that if not avoided, it is important that the several speakers shd. distinctly understand the meaning of each other, without wch. the debates may become verbal unintelligible & interminable; that it is particularly important to be kept in view that the characteristic...
Being satisfied from observation and experience, as well as from Medical testimony that ardent spirit, as a drink, is not only needless, but hurtful; and that the entire disuse of it would tend to promote the health, the virtue, and the happiness of the community, We hereby express our conviction, that should the citizens of the United States, and especially all young men, discontinue entirely...
[made on a letter from Alexander Garrett, April 16, 1831: post April 16, 1831] [ ] H. of Reps. chosen for his real plan by St: Legs. (see notes) in [ ] plan presented Council of Revision of Ex. & principal offrs of Govt. [ ] noted, see p. 8-9. of the pamphlet Executive for 7 years p. 9. on power to [ ] p. 10. Appoint Fedl. Courts for territorial Contests between States payment on debts of...
All Govts. hitherto bad: either tending to despotism, or to anarchy & thro’ that to despotism. The expedt. of fedl. repub: aiming at a security agst both, merits a fair experiments, and the good wishes of all. [It h]as worked well as yet. It has controul’d the Genl Govt. thro the States, as in al: & sedn. laws, and the States when flying individually out of [thorn] yr. orbits have under the...
J. M. was born on the 5th of Mar. (O. 5) 1751. His parents J. M. & N. (Conway) Madison, resided in the County of Orange in Virga. At the time of his birth they were on a visit to her mother, who resided on the Rappahannoc, at Port Conway in the County of King George. At the age of about 12 years, he was placed by his father under the tuition of Donald Robertson, from Scotland, a man of...
Vol. 4. p. 324--"to encourage Agriculture"--How 332--Agricult. manufs. Come. & navy may be protected agst casual combts within [draft?] 449. not too much regulat—meet [un?]equaly [ ] in foreign intercourse 453—"foster fisheries for navy", & food, & protect manufacrs. adaptd. to our [ ] these rules of action [five? fine?] principle of Constn. 5. p. 31 "Take a broader field of Legisln., whether...
Compact express or tacit, [begin? bein?] & essence of free Govt. social compact, theoretical, but possible to be realized in [unaccepted?] tendency __________ Majy. to decide, whether a necessary result or an [ ] one _________ Majy. to chuse a Govt. binding on all. __________ Govt. not a party to the compact, but the creature [ ] the compact being among the Governed (sound [construction?...
J. M. born 5. March (O. S.) 1751 at seat of maternal grandmother opposite Port Royal—recd. his elementary education at the home of his parents in Orange C.) At the age of 12—placed under the tuition of Donald Robertson a distinguished teacher in King & Queen where he went thro the studies preparatory to a college course. Continued those studies—under Revd Thos. Martin a private tutor in his...
As this advice, if it ever see the light will not do it till I am no more it may be considered as issuing from the tomb where truth alone can be respected, and the happiness of man alone consulted. It will be entitled therefore to whatever weight can be derived from good intentions, and from the experience of one, who has served his Country in various stations through a period of forty years,...
superfluous, that this brotherhood and particularly the members of it in our view, have a keen conception of their own interest which governs their negociations. Of the other writings of Mr. M. it may not be amiss to use the inducement they offer of inviting liberality in present dealing by anticipated preference in the future. The test of their value may be referred to in what is now offered...
MR. MADISON’S PAMPHLET. In the Register of the 11th ult. page 193, we copied a paragraph from the Boston Patriot, saying, that a pamphlet now existed, stated by Mr. Jefferson to have been written by James Madison (though published anonymously), in which it is mentioned that " the leading object of the federal convention of 1787, for framing a constitution, to have been, to protect our own...
Another consequence suggests itself as following the nullifying rule–I will illustrate it practically– Suppose S. Carolina to be supported by the requisite number of States in her appeal against the tariff, it is null– but Pennsylvania, with equal right as one of the seventeen, vitally interested in the continuance of the law, and supported by a greater number of sister States, appeals pari...
Wednesday, July 21st. The Board met according to adjournment. Resolved, That the Communication of Dr. Blætterman of this date respecting the pavilion and grounds heretofore in his occupation, be referred to the Executive committee, with authority to grant the privileges he asks, under such restrictions as they deem expedient, and with further authority, if the pavilion should be, hereafter,...
Teusday. July 20th. The Board met according to adjournment. Resolved, That the professor of modern languages will not be required to reside within the precincts of the University and the Pavilion with its adjacent grounds heretofore assigned to him will be applied to such uses, as the Visitors or the Executive Committee may direct. He will be exempt from the duty of attending the meetings of...
Monday July 19th. The Board met according to adjournment. Resolved, That it is the duty of the Chairman, from time to time, to lay before the Faculty all such information as, in his opinion, the interests of the University may require, and promptly to bring to their attention all such offences against the laws as he may deem proper for their animadversion; especially all such as he may think...
The Board met according to adjournment Resolved, That the Chairman’s private book annually communicated to the Board, be preserved by the Secretary of this Board. Resolved, That Dr. Patterson be appointed Chairman of the Faculty for one year from the end of this session. The Board then adjourned till Monday 8. O.Clock. Ms (ViU) .
The Board met according to adjournment. Mr. Randolph, appointed a Committee at the last session of the Board, for the purpose of examining and settling the Bursar’s and Proctor’s accounts, made the following report:—Th: J. Randolph to whom was referred the examination of the accounts of the Bursar and Proctor at the last meeting of the Board, reports;—That he has employed Mr. Martin Dawson to...
The Board met according to adjournment. Resolved That the Visitors will expect from the professors a faithful compliance with those enactments which require weekly and other reports to the Chairman, and, in general, that marked attention to the laws of the Institution which is necessary to recommend them to the respect and observance of the Students. Resolved, That Mr. Conway’s application for...
Wednesday the 14th. Present the same members, & Chapman Johnson and Joseph C. Cabell. On motion resolved; That the sentence of the Faculty pronounced on the 22d. of May in the present year expelling John Willis, a student of the University, is approved; and that the sentence pronounced on the 4th. of the same month expelling the student, Robert W. Walton, is also approved. Resolved, That a...
Teusday the 13th. Present the same members who were engaged in examining papers and preparing business for the action of the Board when organized. Ms (ViU) .
Monday the 12th. Jno. H. Cocke and Thomas J. Randolp<h> attended. Ms (ViU) .
At a meeting of the Rector and Visitors of the University of Virginia, at the University on Saturday the 10th. of July 1830: Present, the Rector, Mr. Monroe being prevented from attending by indisposition, and Genl. Breckenridge by the sickness of his Family. Ms (ViU) .
The apportionment of taxation in the old states of 3/5 for slaves was decided rather from accident, than any accurate calculation. The subject caused much debate in Congress. The east and the south differed. The former was for a high ratio, the latter for a low;—¼, ½, 2/3 were proposed and rejected. At length Mr Madison proposed 3/5, which was accepted, & he still thinks it very near the true...
This certifies that Edward D. Hobbs is a Member for life, of the American Colonization Society. R R Gurley [seal] Secretary ( ICHi ).
The plan proposed by the gentleman from Northampton, freed as it has been from one of its Elements, [taxation], appears to be entitled to a favorable consideration: It is not liable to objections which are so decisive with those, who oppose the rival plan. The original and real ground of opposition between the two parties, is that one basis of representation for both Houses of the Legislature,...
*["Written during the session of the Virginia Convention of 1829-’30. -- Ed.", in Writings of James Madison (Congressional edition), vol. 4, page 28] III.* The right of suffrage being of vital importance, and approving an extension of it to housekeepers and heads of families, I will suggest a few considerations which govern my judgment on the subject. Were the Constitution on hand to be...
Mr. Madison now rose and addressed the Committee in a speech of which the following is the outline & substance. Altho the actual posture of the subject before the Committee might admite a full survey of it, it is not my purpose in rising to enter into the wide field of discussion, which has called forth a display of intellectual resources and varied powers of eloquence that any country might...
INTERESTING FACT. A reference having been made by Mr. Leigh and Mr. Mercer to the 54th number of the Federalist, Mr. Madison yesterday, on a question being put by Mr. Leigh to Mr. Mercer, "who was the author of that paper?" rose and said, that although he was not desirous of saying any thing on the subject, yet, under these circumstances, he thought himself justified in stating that neither...
Divn. of powers to weaken each br. & to balance the whole [ ] Hence Leg. Ex. & Judy. The 2 houses, the veto of Ex & indepce of Judges, liable however to impt. & removal &c Case of negroes--persons as well as property. the sympathy of white population in one branch of Legisl: protect ym agst. masters—the interest of masters protect ym agst. disproportionate taxation. Charters of incorpn....
The plan proposed by the gentleman from Northampton, freed as it has been from one of its Elements, (taxation), appears to be entitled to a favorable consideration: It is not liable to objections which are so decisive with those, who oppose the rival plan. The original and real ground of opposition between the two parties, is that one basis of representation for both Houses of the Legislature,...
The compound Govt. of U. S is without a model, and to be explained by itself; not by similitudes or analogies. The terms, union Federal, national not to be applied to it without the qualifications peculiar to the System: The English Govt. in a great measure sui generis and the terms monarchy used by those who look at the Executive head only, and Commonwealth, by those looking only at the...
This Indenture made this Henshaw day of July one thousand eight hundred and A Madison nine, between James Madison and Dolley P. his wi[fe] the county of Orange, of the one part, and William Smith, of the same county, of the other part— Witnesseth, that the said James Madison and Dolly P. his wife for and in consideration of the sum of eight hundred dollars to the said James by the said William...
(Those who deny that the power of Congs to regulate foreign commerce includes a protective power, yet contend that the power grantable to the States to impose duties on, it was intended to provide for a protection or substitute, and who rely for a proof on the testimonies of L. Martin, must yield to the inference that the protection is a branch of the comercial [expansion sign] power, distinct...