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The information in your last letter, of your return to your garden and your records has given me great pleasure. The records are very interesting, and your translation of them will be an honourable and a durable Monument to your Memory Your friend and my friend Mr Tyng has told you truely that I am “constantly employed” and may add, beyond my Strength of body or mind. Never in my whole life...
I have duly recieved, my dear friend and General, your letter of the 1 st from Philada, giving us the welcome assurance that you will visit the neighborhood which, during the march of our enemy near it, was covered by your shield from his robberies and ravages. in passing the line of your former march you will experience pleasing recollections of the good you have done. my neighbors too of our...
Th: Jeffe r son asks the favor of mr H u ntington to dine with hi m on Sunday ensuing. RC ( DNDAR ); dateline at foot of text; damaged at crease. Not recorded in SJL . William Huntington (b. ca. 1794), merchant, educator, and Episcopal lay preacher, was a native of Connecticut who moved to
In settling some business with M r Garrett to day I find (for the first time I have known it) $200— paid to M r Giacomo Raggi which is that am t more than he should have recieved—- In your statement (to M r Garrett) of M r Appletons acc t May 8 h 1822. You state it thus Proceeds of former remittance $1239 .00 to be paid to Giacomo Raggi 200
I enclose you some lines which were written very hastily yesterday morning immediately after receiving the news of the death of poor Florida Pope after nine months of severe suffering—She was beautiful and a child of the fairest promise and there is some thing remarkable in the serenity and sweetness which closed her dying moments—She was calm collected and happy and distributed her little...
On a former occasion I took the liberty of submitting to your inspection, a little publication, which I had prepared for the Managers of the Society for the Prevention of Pauperism in NewYork. I was actuated by a desire, which I believe is common to all authors, however trifling their performances, the desire of making known their works to the great and good. I am emboldened to trouble your...
Monday July 19th. The Board met according to adjournment. Resolved, That it is the duty of the Chairman, from time to time, to lay before the Faculty all such information as, in his opinion, the interests of the University may require, and promptly to bring to their attention all such offences against the laws as he may deem proper for their animadversion; especially all such as he may think...
Harriet Welsh writes me that George and you intend to visit Mrs. de Wint during the vacation and that if your father grants you permission you intend to go on to Niagara—I had made a partial engagement to accompany Mr. & Mrs. de Wint to Niagara this fall but I do not feel quite sure that I shall be able to accomplish this purpose as your father tho’ he says I may go always appears to have...
I have to thank you for the 2 d vol of your translation of Botta which I recieved with your favor of the 5 th on my return home after a long absence. I join mr Adams heartily in good wishes for the success of your labors, and hope they will bring you both profit & fame. you have certainly rendered a good service to your country; & when the superiority of the work over every other on the same...
I received your letter of the 30 th ultimo, with two Invoices enclosed, for the Marble by the Ship Caroline from Leghorn. The Invoices are returned herewith agreeably to your request. The marks do not agree with the Invoices & bill of lading received. I have entered the Marble and paid the duly thereon copies of the entries are enclosed, & have shipped the same on board the Sloop Eliza Allen,...
The kindness of the motive which led to the request of your letter of the 14 th inst. and which would give some value to an article from me, renders compliance a duty of gratitude. knowing nothing more moral, more sublime more worthy of your preservation than David’s description of the good man, in his 15 th psalm, I will here transcribe it, from Brady and Tate’s version. Lord, who’s the happy...
I this moment only receive your letter of the 17th. Mine by this mail renders nothing more necessary in answer to it. I understand Mr. Crawford is so far recovered that he hopes to be on the road for Washington in a few days. His weakness I presume will make his journey very slow. Sending this with some other letters by an extra messenger who will hardly reach the P. Office in time I add only...
Your Coffee and Corks went by a Waggon on tuesday last, to Charlottesville, care M r Raphael, the Wine is double cased, & ready for the first trusty Boat— MHi .
Although your favour of March 28th accompanying the " History of the Bank " has been so long on hand, the continued inroads on my health, have not permitted me even yet to do more than glance at the Contents of the volume. From that I perceive that it comprizes information which must be extensively acceptable; particuarly to those engaged in political & historical researches. I sincerly wish...
I received your favour of the 17th August and thank you for your prompt compliance with my wishes in the article of books. I have not been in Boston since the receipt of it and cannot therefore acknowledge the receipt of the missing Volumes at Messrs: Cummings & Co—The same reason has prevented my depositing there the two or three books with the name of Mr Shaw in them. One of these was a file...
It is with emmotions of extreme regret, that I am necessitated to trouble you with an inquiry relating to the causes of a phenomenon which has fallen under my observation, which I have not been able to account for satisfactorily to myself—and which I have not been able to find any body who could account for it either to themselves or me, indeed the greatest number of those of whom I have made...
Mrs Adams requests the favor of an order from Mr Hamilton to receive from the Custom House a small Packet containing Childrens caps brought by Mr Oswald from Paris. UK-KeNA : Foreign Office.
Mr Sullivan who will have the pleasure to present you this letter, intending to visit the upper part of our State, & particularly the university, having expressd a desire to be made known to you, I give him with pleasure this introduction. He is the son of gov r Sullivan of Massachusetts with whom you were probably acquainted. With great respect & sincere regard I am dear Sir your friend— MHi .
I have recd. from Mr. H. Wheaton who is engaged in a Biography of the late W. Pinkney a letter wch. I inclose with my answer. If your recollection or memoranda can confirm or enlarge the information I have given with respect to the origin of the Embargo, be so good as to return my answer that it may be improved: If otherwise, it may be sealed & forwarded; the letter from Mr. Wheaton to be...
The condescending kindnesses and proofs of your regard, with which I have been honoured by you induces me, to take the liberty of offering to your acceptance, the humble tribute of a female acquaintance , with which I was lately favoured. I paid her a visit at New-york and could not decline, to Send you in her name her last publication—before She returned to her native country— Amsterdam . She...
I use the opportunity of mr. gallatins return to the United States to acknowledge the receipt of your letter. of the 30th of oct last, and to inform you that he has taken charge of five small parcels for you containing bose and Brocheeses. Baron Humboldt sends you a copy of his last publication and Bishop gregoire a copy of his manuel de Visté . Your Parisian friends are glad to hear of the...
Your Journal No 7. to Janry 30th, Harriet brought me to day, just as we had sat down to dinner; It being thursday, John and Charles thought they would treat themselves, and miss Harriet with a Sleigh ride to Quincy—our Friends and acquaintance do not fail to improve the Season, and sometimes come upon us a little unwarily, for one day last week, I had nine at once to dine, when I knew only of...
I will not attempt my dear Payne to express what you have added to our preceding distress by disregarding your Mother’s last letter inclosing the means for your immediate return. You have not even mitigated her feelings and gloomy conjectures, by acknowledg. the rect. of it. And I now hasten to a subject which if disclosed to her, would but inflict new tortures. I learn that the arrears for...
In return for the honor you did me by the Communication in your favour of the 15 th Jan y , please to accept my most sincere acknowledgements. I would by no means inconvenience you a second time were I aware how a Letter from me could reach the Board of Visitors of the College, and consequently once more take the Liberty of trespassing on your politeness to entreat, you will have the goodness...
Will you pardon my presumption in addressing a few lines to you, for the purposes of soliciting your aid on obtaining an appointment for my Son in one of the public Departments,—it is so long since I have had the pleasure of seeing you, & my acquaintance even then was so limited, that I cannot but feel the temerity, of my present application, I rely Sir, on your well known Philanthropy.—My...
¶ From Thomas Jefferson. Letter not found. 2 June 1820 . Enclosed in Dolley Madison to Lewis J. Cist, 4 July 1842 ( DLC : Dolley Madison Papers).
I have the pleasure of sending you through mr Sheldon, three great volumes and two letter s. The greeks have lately gained some advantages, and anticipating freedom are now preposing a constitution, or form of government adapted to their situation. The more enlightened Spaniards, motivated by the same feelings, still manifest a vigorous resistance: but the lower class, it is said, generally...
I received your Letter of the 7th yesterday Evening and was very happy to learn that you sustained the rigours of the Climate so well as I have involuntarily felt some apprehensions lest you should have suffered in consequence of your residence for so long a time in one so much warmer and milder—Poor Charles left us two days ago and I think with deeper regret even than usual—under an...
I hope you will believe me sincere when I assure you that it is with the greatest reluctance that I intrude on the quiet of your calm retreat, at an age when exertion must be irksome; yet when I reflect that there is a motive which has ever been more powerful with you than even the love of philosophie ease, the love of active kindness, I am emboldened to beg a few moments of your time. Having...
On my return from a visit to our University I recd your letter of the 10th. If I commend your zeal on a subject you deem both just & important, I must regret that you ascribe to my opinion on it, an influence wch experience does not warrant; and that you cast your eye on one only of the grounds on which I declined an interposition. The other, my advanced stage of life, and the appropriation of...
I have the honor of transmitting herewith, an Engraving of John Paul Jones , which I received yesterday for the embellishment of his Life, which is now, in press: my object in enclosing this engraving to you, is, to ask your opinion as to the likeness , design, & c . and if you think the facsimilie of his signature is Correct. My great anxiety in having the Work & likeness Complete must be, my...
Will you allow me Sir, the honor of presenting, and afford me the gratification of perusing the pamphlet herewith forwarded? containing an account of the Battle of Bunker Hill by Major Genl. Dearborn, and a feeble endeavour on my part, to repel the charges therein made, against the character and conduct of the late Major Genl. Israel Putnam. In ordinary cases, I have deemed the pamphlet in its...
When I had the pleasure to be at your house a few weeks since, you expressed a desire to have another copy of the Report of our Commissioners upon a System of Common Schools. Agreeably to my promise at that time, I now send you the pamphlet. I trust, that I may be permitted to use the occasion to testify to you the very high respect, which I entertain for your persevering labours in the cause...
I regret to find, by your letter of the 20th Feby that some of the goods sent were higher priced than you contemplated: & I can readily account for your remark so far as relates to the glasswares, the silk hose, & furniture calico: each of these being entitled to a drawback on exportation, but the expences at the excise office & custom house in stamps bonds & entry would, on such small...
Mine of Feb. 18. informed you I had desired mr Gibson to remit you 100.D. on account which he writes me he has done. the object of the present is to let you know I shall set out for Bedford the 10 th of April & be back by the 10 th of May which may govern you in sending the proof sheets of Tracy . I shall hope on my return to find my Tacitus here.
I thank you for a very pleasant letter, and I supplicate a continuance of them—I have given up the hopes of seeing the family, or any part of it this Year—but when the Marquis is gone I hope to have letters from your Brother, John, and yourself, which will help to keep up my old spirits a little longer, my heart & wishes and Prayers are with you forever—We have nothing to tell you here but...
May I ask the favor of your advise, how to act on the subject of the board of the Students in consiquence of the suspension of the exercises of the schools at the University from the 6th February to the 1st of April—Up to what time should board be required of the Student? In most cases where I have settled since this suspension—I have retained board for the month of February, and only required...
It has for some time past that I have promised myself the pleasure of paying you a Visit, yet the situation of my family and the interests of the Museum has not allowed me that indulgence. My Son Titian has not only great skill in preserving all kinds of Animals, but also he has acquired an abundance of knowledge in Natural history, I mean of animated nature. And my Son Franklin is possessed...
I have the honor to inclose two printed copies of a report relative to the latitude and longitude of the Capitol in this City; one of which is intended for your own use, the other for the use of the University or Seminary of learning near Charlottesville. With great respect, I have the honor to be, Your most Obedt. servant, RC ( DLC ). Addressed by Lambert to JM, and franked. Docketed by JM....
It may not be otherwise than gratifying to you to hear from one who you have long known and whose political course seldom if ever differed from yours Your late vote in convention where you stood alone I should feel proud of, having viewed your proceedings throughout I think you have very few if any old friends here who does not feel perfectly satisfied The vote you give alone I most certainly...
I take the liberty of enclosing a list of queries which Judge Tilghman has handed to me—Many of these are local—but if to any of them you can give a reply which may assist him in the Task he has undertaken & enable him to do the Justice he wishes to our Deceased friend ( whose loss we every day feel more & more) it is very desireable—
In reply to your question, upon what map did the Commissioners trace the boundary line described in the Treaty of 1783—I answer that it was Mitchells map. And to your question, whether by the Long Lake intended by the treaty was meant the Long Lake laid down in Mitchells Map,—I answer, that it was, & that we used no other authority for places named in the description of the boundary line than...
I enclose the Letter just received I cannot guess why it was written to me— MHi : Adams Papers.
On the 24 th of Oct r I had the honor to address you, acknowledging receipt of the amount of your Draft on Bernard Peyton Esq r &c. I think I already took the liberty of informing you that I had resumed the Agency of the “Boston Glass Comp y ” and Should be gratified to receive your future orders— Presuming that the “Central College” will now progress rapidly to completion, and that it is your...
I ought not to have neglected so long to write you an account of the delightful visit I received from M r and M rs Cooledge, M rs C— deserves all the high praises I have constantly heard concerning her, She entertained me with accounts of your sentiments of human life, which accorded so perfectly with mine that it gave me great delight—In one point however I could not agree—she said, she had...
I thank you for the use of the enclosed papers, which I have copied, and now commit to the first mail after my return to this place. I shall endeavor to make myself master as well of your plan for schools, as of that for Colleges, before the period at which these subjects will be taken up in the House of Delegates . If you could conveniently spare the time, I think it would be of great benefit...
It is entirely owing to circumstances apart from my own intentions, that I have deferred the pleasure it gives me to acknowledge the receipt of materials for a biographical sketch of yourself intended for the National Portrait Gallery furnished by a friend of your selection—The document thus furnished is very satisfactory, and leaves nothing to regret; but it’s brevity , a fault which we have...
The corporation of the City of NewYork have caused medals to be struck to commemorate the completion of the Erie Canal which unites the great Western Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean. The Corporation influenced by a deep and profound respect for those citizens who by eminent public services have secured the confidence of our Country, and attained the highest office in the gift of the Republic,...
I cannot imagine my Dear John what can be the reason of your not writing to me. You used to be a very regular correspondent, but I suppose the Ladies have such demands on your time you have none to bestow on your poor Mother. We are very happy to learn from Mr Pomeroy, that your Grandfather is so entirely recovered he tells us the old Gentleman has not looked so well this two years as he does...
After having spent fourteen years of my life in the Service of my Country, and having had so distinguished a Share in the establishment of our Relations with the Emperor of Russia, I returned to the US under a full conviction of enjoying, as I felt I deserved, the countenance & Confidence of my Government at home, as I had done abroad. But I had not been long here, before I was apprized by Mr....