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Documents filtered by: Period="post-Madison Presidency"
Results 14551-14600 of 15,150 sorted by editorial placement
I send you a M.S. copy of the new enactments passed by the Visitors of the University at their late session, and also a printed copy of those formerly past now made conformable, by corrections with the pen, withe the amendments enacted at the same session, and request that by handing them from the one to the other of the Professors they may make them known by reading them successively to the...
M r Brockenbrough was before desired to remit to Gen l Dearborn Collector of Boston on the marble capitels arrived there Freight from Leghorn to Boston 795.30 Expenses in Boston 17.50 Insurance 72.28 885.08 [note in Brockenbrough’s hand?] : Nov 9 ’25 Voucher rec d he is now desired to remit to Jonathan Thompson, Collector of New York on the bases & pavement arrived there Duties on 31. cases. @...
Immediately on the reciept of your favor of Sep. 22. I directed the Proctor of the University to have remitted to you the sum of 885. D 08 according to the statement in your letter, which I hope you have duly recieved. as a meeting of the board of Visitors was then to take place within a few days, I have delayed somewhat the returning the proper bond. the Board preferred bonding the whole for...
I sent forward your cask Wine some days ago, & hope it is safely with you before this—the Bundle of Books from New York, of which you enclosed me a bill of lading, was rec d to day, & immediately forwarded to J. & Raphael, together with another small parcel, from a M r Lewis of Spottsylvania, intended for yourself & D r Blaettermann—I hope they will also get safe to hand— I am deeply mortified...
The present will be forwarded by M r Caustin, the general Agent for the sufferers by depredation Committed by the French prior to the year 1800—He has Collected a Mass of testimony all going to Confirm the Opinion I had always had. That the Government had bartered the fair Claims of the Merchants against the Guarantee of the W. Indian Islands. and was bound in Common honesty to pay the losses...
I have not a scrip of a pen on the subject of the marbles you mention as arrived for me at Philada, neither invoice, nor advice nor letter of any sort. I must therefore substitute conjecture for certainty. in Aug. 1823. an Italian stone cutter Giacomo Raggi whom mr Appleton had sent us was returning to Italy, with an intention however of coming back to us. he agreed to bring me 2. alabaster...
Man . 532 Know all Men by these Presents ....that We, Thomas Jefferson, John H. Cocke James Madison Chapman Johnson, James Breckenridge, George Loyall and Joseph C. Cabell are held and firmly bound to the United States of America , in the sum of FIFTY THOUSAND DOLLARS, to be paid to the United States; for payment whereof, we bind ourselves, our heirs executors and administrators, jointly and...
It is so long since I ought to have written to you that I am ashamed to quote your last date. the information particularly which you were so kind as to obtain and furnish me, as to the cost of a college clock should have been answered. but finding the price you mentioned far beyond our expectation and funds, I took time to have other enquiries made. these however did not result in bringing the...
M r Browere (pronounced Brower) is so anxious to pay his respects to you that I can not refuse him a line of introduction His object is to take your likeness in plaster, much desired it appears by patrons of a Public Gallery. His success as an Artist is very highly attested. His bust of Gen l Lafayette is pronounced by other imitation Artists as a conspicuous proof of his talent. The little...
Your favor of Octob.—has been duly recieved. the information which I have given you from time to time has kept you truly informed of the state of our University. it behoves me then also to mention to you a serious incident which has just taken place there; and the rather as, of the thousand versions which will be given, not one will be true. my position enables me to say what is so, but with...
Your much esteem d of the 9th:, covering M r R’s letter has been rec’d, & am at a loss for words to express to you the obligations I feel myself under for this, & other marks of your esteem & confidence—I beg you to be assured I am duly sensible of them, & shall ever feel proud to have merited the good will of one as exalted in every respect—I only regret that I have it not in my power to make...
I have taken the liberty of sending to you the notice annexed, for the purpose of exciting attention to a subject which cannot fail to be interesting to literary men. The prevailing system of education needs improvement. It is a complaint often repeated, that the studies which are usually considered preparatory to an academical education, are so tedious to children and youth, as to excite...
The short conversation which I had with you on the subject of History, and the decided terms in which you condemned Hume for his want of truth, and partiality; induce me to ask of you the great favour to recommend such Historians as may be most confided in, for being authentic & impartial; and to direct me in a course of history, Ancient & Modern—The importance and advantages of historical...
Every thing is going on smoothly at the University. the Students are attending their schools more assiduously, and looking to their Professors with more respect. the authority of the latter is visibly strengthened, as is the confidence of those who visit the place, and the effect, on the whole, has been visibly salutary. the Professors are all lecturing, the two Cantabs however somewhat in the...
Your favor of Sep. 24. was recieved in due time and with great thankfulness on behalf of our University for the kind offer of mineral and geological articles. we are young, and have as yet little or nothing in either of these branches of science. and we will request you so far to add to the proffered favor as to chuse for us what you think would be best for us of your collection and of what...
Raggi called on me yesterday and explained to me the contents of the two boxes of marble arrived at Philadelphia to my address from mr Appleton. the one containing a truncated column 32. I. high, 16 I. diam the other contains the base of the column. I have recieved no bill of lading from mr Appleton, nor other invoice but his general account which therefore I now inclose you. it is the upper...
I submitted your letter of 12 th to our Collector who has assumed the value mentiond in your letter receiving the Duty as a Deposit, until you can inform us further of the Value. I have shipped them per Schooner Cumberland Capt Wheaton to the care of M r Peyton, desiring they may be carefully handled—when the charges are ascertaind you shall know them: I had a small balance in my hands which...
Dr Blaetterman has purchased of M r Raggi his alabaster & Marble ornaments left with me and has drawn on me for $100 in favor of M r Raggi—I advanced M r Raggi when he left this to return to Italy which he states was paid to M r Appleton, is there any such credit in M r A. accounts? if not I must hold on fifty dollars of Dr: Blaettermans order for the sum advanced him most respectfully CSmH .
Raggi called on me yesterday while at dinner with company whom I could not leave to open the budget of Appleton’s letters. he promised to come again tomorrow. Appleton informed me expressly that Raggi had not repaid our 50.D. there, and of course that we must look to them here. he claims them on the ground that the price at which he contracted for the bases was too small. but that is nothing...
Your letter of the 13 th inst. enclosing the bond &c, has been rec d , also one from John Brockenbrough Esq— of Richmond enclosing a Draft on the New England Bank in this city for 885.8/100 Dollars which has been paid.— On paying the premium notes for insurance I find that the charges for the policies were included in them, & therefore return you the two dollars, in a Draft from the New...
I have just now recieved your letter of Sep. 22 on the subject of appointing Commissioners in my case with the Rivanna company. I have long since put all my business into the hands of my grandson Th: J. Randolph, and must the more especially refer this to him, being unable to leave the house myself, nor likely to be otherwise soon if ever I will immediately communicate your letter to him and...
I inclose you a letter from N. H. Lewis as Secretary of the Rivanna company, as also a copy of the interlocutory decree of Chancellor Brown for the appointment of Commissioners, which is the object of this letter. I have informed mr Lewis that I leave all further proceedings in this matter to you, and shall confirm whatever you do in it. MHi : Coolidge Collection.
Eighty two years old, my memory gone, my mind close following it 5. months confined to the house by a painful complaint, which, permitting my neither to walk nor to sit, obliges me to be constantly reclined, and to write in that posture, when I write at all, you, as my friend would not propose or permit me to take up such a case as is the subject of mr Cau st en’s letter, commencing with the...
Desirous of becoming a student of that Collage, I have taken this method, of whriting to you. Wisthing to know the regulations of the Collage; particularly when the next cession commences, and what is the price of tuition and also board and lodging, and what amount of money will be sufficient for a student to remain there, yearly. and how long it will take an indu s trious scholar to graduate;...
I rejoice, and so will you, that I am enabled to inform you that our aged friend M r Adams has recovered, remarkably, from that sunken state of debility, which appeared to indicate his dissolution last November, & the following winter. He cannot, besure, walk without help, nor see objects distinctly, neither can he feed himself; but he sleeps well & wakes refreshed, & eats very hearty. From a...
I am very anxious to see you, and the sooner the more I shall be gratified. the dissensions at the University, depend, for a thorough healing on a delicate conduct of it’s friends at this time. a party schism among the Professors is the thing to be feared. my health is subject but to small changes. paroxysms of pain succeeded by intervals of ease, more or less short. I am far from foreseeing...
I reached this place last monday exhausted by fatigue & long sickness almost to death. The daily hope of being better, & able to visit you, has prevented my even sending to inquire after your health. I shall wait on you in a few days. Mr. Johnson (whom I saw at Lynchburg) had given me a great deal of very unpleasant intelligence of the university. The temper of Mssrs. Key & Long toward me as...
Language is inadequate to form an apology for this presumptous address and if mental distress or isolation of situation were not the only plea to meet the forgiveness of You most Respected Sir I would not dare to elicit its incentive now to apologise is impossible & to you I feel no humility; of a Proud & deserving family of Virginia Educated with Maternal care Widow of a highly eminent...
I do not know whether the Professor to whom Antient and Modern history are assigned in the University, have yet decided on the course of historical reading which they will recommend to their schools. if they have, I wish this letter to be considered as not written; as their course, the result of mature consideration, will be preferable to any thing I could recommend. under this uncertainty,...
I will be glad to take of you the present year about 9 or 100. gall s of cyder, which I hope you will chuse for me of your very best. p. be pleased to accept my best wishes and respects MHi .
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to Murot and acknoleging the reciept of his favor of Sep: 29. informs him that he has never heard of any English translation of the Works of Filangieri. he prays him to accept his respectful salutations and best wishes CSmH .
My daughter puts into my hands a letter from you which I answer with pleasure. I must first correct your misrecollections of the name of the person appointed Collector of the stamp-duties in this state. it was not Norton , but Col o George Mercer, brother of our quondam Judge Mercer. I rec d a lre of Sep. 9. from John Vaughan, of the A.P.S. informing me that R. H. Lee, gr. son, of the...
I have to thank you for your favor of the 10 th inst. and the two pamphlets accompanying it on the subject of Greek grammars. I confess I should have been of an opinion very different from that which excluded it from a place in the Review. the subject is interesting, is learnedly treated, and I think worth pursuing until a general accord shall be produced. for I concur with you in believing...
Th: Jefferson presents his respects to the Postmaster at Lynchburg, and having requested him in a note of yesterday to send by mail to this place a letter which he supposes to be lying in that office for him, he has now to pray he will send it by the bearer, being an earlier opportunity than he had expected would occur: & tenders him his salutations. Privately owned.
Wishing to purchase a small tract of Land in the vicinity of the Natural Bridge and being informed that you wish to dispose of your “bridge tract” I have taken the liberty of addressing you on the subjects. If you are disposed to sell it, I would thank you to drop me a few lines informing me of your price, the payments you would require, the number of acres in the tract & c & c CtY .
I hate to trouble you about such a matter; but for the reason I have assigned, for the two last Years, may I take the liberty of asking you when it will be convenient for you to transmit to the Governor the Annual Communication about the University? The Legislature having directed it to be laid on the table of the House, on the 1 st day of its session I am anxious, as Public Printer, to have...
Your letter of Sep. 8. enquiring after the house and room in which the Declaration of independance was written has excited my curiosity to know whether my recollections were such as to enable you to find out the house. a line on the subject will oblige D r Sir DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
The kind good wishes you have so often manifested for the success of our University has encoraged me to levy on you as a contribution the little services we may have occasion to ask in Philadelphia, which I am sure you will consider rather as occasions of exercising your benevolence than as burthens. I had engaged a most excellent Brewer to furnish our boarding houses at the University, and...
I am sure you have found, ere this that the being in a position to bestow offices, is not a very pleasant circumstance and you had before experience enough that the sollicitation of them is not more so. I have therefore made it a general rule not to trouble the government with such sollicitations. yet there are now and then cases which oblige one to disregard rule. I dare say you must well...
I take the liberty of writing this introductory letter to you for the purpose of diminishing the embarrassment, with which my young friend M r Davis will present himself at Monticello to pay his homage to you I venture to assure him, of that kind reception, which is merited by the feelings that prompt his visit to you; MHi .
I thought I had mentioned to you some time ago that to prevent people’s passing through the grounds on the North side of the Rotunda, the gate at Dinsmore’s corner should be taken away and a fence run from there leaving a lane to the gate at Hotel B so as to leave an entrance into the gate at East street but not to pass on further Gen l Cocke mentioned to me yesterday that you proposed to run...
I wish to get the ground immediately around the University surveyed in order to get the lots of the Professors & Hotel Keepers layed off to the best advantage, I can get some of the young gentlemen here (that understand surveying) to assist me if you will do me the favor of lending me your compass & chain they shall be taken particular care of, and returned immediately after the work is...
I am a bout to petition Congress to see if they will do me the same Justice that was done to other officers who fought by my side in the Revolutionary war. In stead of half pay for life the officers present mad choice of a commission of full pay for five years in the highest rank they held in the Army during the revolutionary war. Which was a greed too Many many young officers who had not...
You have laid me under the greatest obligation, by your kind forbearance on the note of my grandson, endorsed by me. age and infirmities have for some time disabled me from business and obliged me to turn over every thing of the kind to my grandson Th: J. Randolph in whom I have unlimited confidence. I had before recieved notice from the bank and sent it directly to my grandson, to whom I had...
A young gentleman of this village a graduate of Union College Newyork is desirous of completing his education in the University of Virginia he has selected the profession of the Law for his future usefulness and living. His principle object at the University will consequently be the benefit of the Law Lectures. He will also seek to attain a greater proficiency in moral science and study the...
I now return the deeds and plats of the University lands recieved from you at different times, and also an inclusive plat of the whole 7. parcels bought at different times laid down as exactly as the lines of the several separate ones would admit. I mentioned to you not long since an error which had crept into our practice which it is necessary to correct. it arose thus. the law establishing...
I cannot too much thank you for your kind letter of the 14 th It gave me great relief from the anxiety I was under on account of reports as to your health & the affairs of the University—To the last, as mere reports, I should have paid no attention, after those which prevailed on the same subject, & without even the shadow of a foundation, some time ago. But the Richmond Enquirer which I see...
We received last night a large box of books from Mr Hilliards of which I suppose you have had some account: the books embrace almost every subject of science, Law medicine, History, Poetry &c. There came also by the same conveyance, a box of specimines of Mineralogy. Collected from various parts of Europe & the Northern States by Mr M c Lure, I believe. CSmH .
Your letter of Oct 7. has been some time in hand, and the books are now recieved. ill health has prevented my answering it sooner, being still confined mostly to the house I shall on this as on every other occasion make free observations, because they will enable you the better to enter into our views. but I make them under the disadvantage of not having seen the books, and judging from the...
The book ‘Hermes Scythicus’ is intended for Mr Jefferson. It was sent by a gentleman of N. York who thought Mr Jefferson might not have seen it, and might probably take some pleasure in looking in it. Mr Long thanks Mr Jefferson for the small pamphlet he sent down the other day. and hopes his health will continue to improve. MHi .