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Accept my thanks for your favour of last month. The safe Arrival of your books has quieted my conscience. There is nothing within the narrow Compass of human knowledge more interesting, than the Subject of your Letter. If “the Idea of a Government in one Center Seems to be every where exploded” perhaps Something remains undefined, as dangerous, as plausible and pernicious as that Idea. Half a...
I am at present obliged to write to you by another hand. The inclosed letter was sent to me in May last by your Son Thomas B. Adams Esquire, with a request that I should return it under cover to you. I regret that owing to a mistake of his residence, I had not the pleasure of his company at my table when he was last in this City. Miss Rutter has been so kind, I understand, as to explain the...
I return the letter of JQ, which you lent me. You know his is a painter. And which of Hogarths is more moral or more satirical? Have you adjusted your Bib & Tucker to visit the President? There is no other theme of conversation at present. It is kind in him at this pressing time to give the Nation something to talk about. His plain manners will please in general. Tranquility & prosperity to...
From the tenderness of Friendship and the Weakness of Compassion and humanity, I have promised two Gentlemen to mention their names to you, as Candidates for Mr Daltons late Office, Captain Tucker and Mr Deblois. A Friendship of forty Years with the former, and of fifty Six years with Mr Dalton have deeply interested my Feelings in behalf of both these Gentlemen. But what Signify Feelings when...
I have received the letter you did me the honour of writing to me on the 14th of this month answering to me my election by the American Society for encouraging domestic manufactures, instituted in New York as a member, an honour made more illustrious by the President of the United States. Be pleased to present my respects to the Society, and my thanks for the honour they have done me, and to...
From the tenderness of friendship, & the weakness of compassion & humanity, I have promised two gentlemen to mention their names to you as Candidates for mr Daltons late office. Captain Tucker and mr Deblois. A friendship of 40 years with the former & of 56 years with the mr Dalton have deeply interested my feelings in behalf of both these gentlemen. But what signifies feelings when I know...
Your kind Letter of the 8th. and the enclosed Biography have been read with all the interest inspired by So long a Friendship; though a great part of it was well known to me long ago. Writing has indeed become extreamly painfull to me: to such a degree, that the numerous imperious demands upon me, often compell me to neglect Some of my dearest and most honoured Friends. I have lent your Sketch...
As we have amused ourselves with looking at a few pictures, suppose we should add one more to the Gallery. The Artist makes the scene of his action that spacious Apartment that we very properly denominated Fanuel Hall. The Governor, the Lieutenant Governor, the Judges, the Counsellors, the Representatives, the President and Professors & Students of the University; the Docters of Law, Physic, &...
Another application has been made to me by Mr Elbridge Gerry, the oldest Son of the late Vice President, for a recommendation to the office of Surveyor in Boston. How can I recollect, the laborious Services, the great Sacrifices of a Gerry for forty years, and the destitute Circumstances of his Widow and Children, without Emotion. I told him I had mentioned the Names of Tucker and Deblois;...
I have received my pamphlet & your Register, with your letter of the 20th. Inclosed are four papers. No 1. A letter from President Washington Aug 27. 1790. No 2 another letter on the same subject on the same day Aug 27. 1790. No. 3 First rough draught of an answer, in my hand writing. 4 a copy of my answer to the President, which was sent to him dated Aug 29th. 1790. & which, if it was not...
“Inclosed are four papers.—No. 1. A letter from President Washington, Aug. 27, 1790; No. 2. Another letter on the same subject, on the same day, Aug. 27, 1790. No. 3. First rough draught of an answer, in my hand writing. 4. A copy of my answer to the president, which was sent to him, dated August 29, 1790, and which, if it was not consumed in the Vandalion combustion of Washington, is probably...
Thou wast good enough to inform me that ‘no Book of mine would disturb thy peace,’ & I accordingly ordered my publisher to send thee a small volume, some time last winter. It is a little thing—but still as it is my youngest child, in this way, I feel some degree of anxiety about its fate. I speak of ‘The Mother-in-Law,’ published at Boston. I congratulate thee, & the country, on the return of...
The oldest Statesman in North America is no more.—Vixit. McKean, for whose services, and indeed for whose patronage, the two States of Pensylvania and Delaware, once contended, is numbered with his fathers. I cannot express my feelings upon this event in any way better, than by the publication of the enclosed letters. 1st. June 13th. 1812 2nd. August 20th 1813 3rd. August 28th 1813 4th....
I have received my Pamphlet and your Register, with your Letter of the 20th. “Inclosed are four Papers—No. 1. A Letter from President Washington, Aug. 27, 1790. No. 2. Another Letter, on the Same Subject, on the Same day. Aug. 27, 1790. No. 3. First rough draught of an Answer, in my hand Writing. 4. A Copy of my Answer to the President, which was Sent to him dated August 29, 1790, and which,...
I regret that I could not have the pleasure of seing you again before you left town, which I found that you had done, when I calld yesterday at your lodgings. I wanted to communicate more fully with you, respecting the part I ought to take, in the ceremonies of this day. It is possible you may be in town to day in which I case I may still enjoy that advantage. my particular object in sending...
as A tribute of respect and Esteem for the Eminent virtues of one of the principal Fathers of my Nations Admirable institutions and a promoter of her Independence I take the Liberty of presenting you a copy of the Narrative of my late Disasters and Sufferings in Africa &c cherishing a hope that its perusal will not prove irksome. I have the Honour to be with the greatest / regard and profound...
I gratefully return the papers you did me the honor to send into me, with a copy of them inserted in the Register. I hardly knew how far I was authorized to give your private letter to the public; but the parts inserted seemed necessary as an introduction to the papers; & I hope I have not transcended your will in that respect. I will thank you for the papers about Miranda’s affair. It is not...
In the good old English Language of your Virginian and my New England Ancestors, I am right glad to See you in the oldest Plantation, in old Massachusetts, next to Salem, where you will be recd with more Splendor and I hope with equal Cordiallity. MHi : Elizabeth Smith Scrapbook; Smith-Townsend Family Papers.
I am impatient to See your Plan of a University and new System of Education. To assist you in your contemplations, I Send you, a Pamplet, “The Politicks of Connecticut.” By a federal Republican in the name of Hamilton. Was there ever Such a combination? Two Copies were Sent me from the Post on Saturday last: I know not from whence nor by whom. Now Sir! please to hear a modest Proposal. Let me...
A Society has been established at this place for the promotion of agricultural and rural affairs—It consist of the most respectable and intelligent citizens of our county, who convinced of the imperfect state of agriculture among us, are stimulated by the most laudable motives to effect some improvements in it, and not only by examples on their farms, but by every other means which lay in...
I have the pleasure to return to you the letters of Gov McKean, with a copy of them inserted in the Register. My early & good friend Cæsar A Rodney, of Delaware, nephew of C.R. of the “76 congress, informs me that he has some of deceased patriots’ letters dated in 1777—1799; & says he will furnish them. When they are published, I shall send a copy to you. I am gratified to observe that the...
Presuming that, as age advances, it must become irksome to maintain your extensive correspondence, I have long delayed addressing a line to you, hesitating, though I knew the subject would interest. The high respect I entertain for yourself and your son, the honble John Q. Adams, will not permit me longer to hesitate, since the communication, given in a Kentucky Paper, respecting our...
I have read your narrative, and I cannot scruple to recommend it to the serious, candid and attentive perusal, not only of all who delight in voyages and travels, and all those who love to have their strong passions of pity and terror excited by the artificial means of tragedies and romances, but of all who have leisure, capacity and inclination to read any thing. I should be glad to see a...
I have received your letter of the 15th: and rejoice in the establishment of your Society for the promotion of Agriculture. Our mother Earth is a kind, tender, affectionate Parent who will abundantly reward every filial and rational attention that is paid to her. But are you not too modest, in behalf of the Southern States? Your cotton, your Sugar, and your Hemp, are improvements such as the...
After revolving upon some suitable apology for intruding myself with the following statement and request, I have thought it most respectful to decline offering any, expect to observe that if ought appears to your better judgement improper in either, that you will attribute it to any thing else than a willingness on my part to act so, in any respect towards you. For six years ending with the...
With great pleasure, I, yesterday, received your favour of the 1st Inst. acknowledging the receipt of my letter of July 21st.—I conceive it important always thus early to advise a correspondent of the receipt of important letters, which I offer as my apology for this line. Were it not for the trouble in writing at your time of life, I should be tempted to draw largely upon your benevolence, in...
I fear I have not answered your letter of 20th of June. That of the 8th: of August, I certainly have not. I have been justly accused of Imbecility & Dotage for twenty years past. Yet I seem to be a Man of more consequence now, than I ever was before in my whole life. What a cloud of Reminiscences, has your last letter, exhailed in my old brain! Several of with whom I gazed through a telescope...
I fear I have not answered your letter of 20th. of June. That of the 8th. of August I certainly have not. I have been justly accused of Imbecillity and Dotage for Twenty Years past. Yet I Seem to be a Man of more consequence now, than I ever was before, in my whole Life. What a Cloud of Reminiscences, has your last Letter, exhailed in my old brain! Sewal, with whom I gazed through a Telescope...
Dinner to Mr. Adams.—On the 26th ult. a public dinner was given to Mr Adams, by the citizens of Boston, at which most of the distinghed men of both political parties were present, among the number was the honorable John Adams, the second president of the United States, who gave the following volunteer toast : By the Honorable John Adams.—The Temple of Liberty, and the Temple of Concord—in...
A month’s absence from Monticello has added to the delay of acknoleging your last letters; and indeed for a month before I left it our projected College gave me constant employment; for being the only Visitor in it’s immediate neighborhood, all it’s administrative business falls on me, and that, where building is going on, is not a little. in yours of July 15, you express a wish to see our...
The procrastination of Old Age and the dissipation of the month of August must be my Apologies for neglecting your important Letter of July, to this day. When I heard that your Register was in danger of being discontinued for Want of Support, I regretted the discouragement very Sincerely: as nearly thirty Years ago I lamented the Period of Mr Careys American Museum. I mean not to give any...
I will now venture to congratulate you upon your relief from a part of the heavy burthen which has been imposed upon you for So many months. And above all I congratulate you, my son and myself on your future destination. Had Providence permitted me to choose Events my heart would have dictated none other. Accept my Thanks for your uninterrupted and invariable kindness to me and my Friends, and...
On the rect. of a Letter signed by you and several others, respecting a Boat belonging to a Mr. Davis of Quincey; I immediately ordered an investigation of the transaction; And now forward to you the enclosed Letters, showing the result of the Inquiry—The injury that the Boat sustained appears to been purely accidental. I regret that Mr. Davis did not represent the Circumstance to the...
Having in so long a time not received a word from Quincÿ, although I was freed from all anxiety about your wellfare mrs Guild and her amiable sister Catherine, both having informed me, that you continued to enjoy not only a hum cum dignitate, which would be nothing new—but all possible happiness that can fall to the share of human mind, while your excellent Lady’s gratification must have...
I regret that I had not the pleasure of seeing your son, when he passed through this city. I did not hear of his being here, till the Steam Boat had left the wharf. I now address a line to you, asking your opinion on certain points, on which I want information and your advice.—Our Gen. Assembly meet at N. Haven, on the ninth of October—and I shall leave this on the eighth, being chosen a...
Mr J. A Smiths appointment was not by J. Q. A but by the President “Sancte Socrate ora pro nobis” Said Erasmus on reading the Doctrine of Socrates so like the christian. My memory does not recollect the place in Plato and my Eyes cannot look it. But as Plato learned all he taught in Egypt and India, I choose “petere fontes.” I am of Sir William Jones’s Mind that “Our divine Religion, has no...
I would inform you my daughter Mrs: Lincoln died yesterday after a lingering illness. The funeral will be tomorrow.—The bell will toll at 3—O—clock.— If convenient it would be highly gratifying to us for yours, Judge Adams’s & Mr. John Greenleafs families to attend.— With sentiments of the highest respect / & esteem your most obedient servant.— MHi : Adams Papers.
Will you be so good as to procure for me a piece of white marble four and twenty inches in length and twenty inches in breadth to be inserted in a slab of Quincy granite with the following inscription on it and send it to me and your bill shall be honoured by your friend and humble / servant Inscription Dedicated to the memory of Joseph Adams senior who died December 6. 1694: and of Abigail...
I thank you for your kind congratulations on the return of my little family from Europe. To receive them all in fine hea l th and good Spirits, after so long an absence, was a greater Blessing, than at my time of Life when they went away I had any right to hope or reason to expect. If the Secretary of State can give Satisfaction to his fellow citizens in his new Office it well be a Source of...
I received on Saturday last, through the medium of the Post-Office, a letter from you dated the 9th. inst. in which you request me to procure you a piece of white marble 24 inches in length, by 20 inches in breadth, with an inscription engraved on it. Your request shall be immediately attended to, and the slab ready for delivery within eight or ten days from the date of this letter. You have...
I take the liberty of Congratulating you on the returne of your worthy Son to America, after years of absence in Europe, And may He satisfactorily discharge the duties of his present appointment.—I was pleased and much gratified with a short interview with President Munro, on his late tour into the District of Maine: And have considerable expectations that the difference in Sentiment, on the...
It is now 37 years since I had the pleasure to recieve your first letter at Anconis It was a paternal letter containing advice to a Young Man, which was peculiarly usefull to me. You than said—“ I must talk to you like an old man ”—I am now 15 years older than you was than. In several of your Subsequent letters you express’d a wish to know precisely, the conversation which pass’d between Judge...
I thank you for your favour of the 2nd. If, 37 years ago, I wrote to you in the character of an Old Man, I must now write in that of a Superannuated one. When Chief Justice Oliver Said to you in 1782 that he dreaded “me more than any Man in America” he did not explain his reasons. I will not pretend at Present to conjecture more than one. He knew that I was the first Projector of the...
I take leave to present to you a Map, (of the military bounty Lands in the Illinois Territory) engraved for the use of the Soldiers of the late Army. By means of these Maps every Soldier can, for one dollar, obtain accurate information relative to the soil, Timber, & position of the Tract which falls to his lot, & thereby appreciate the value of his Country’s bounty. I have the honor / to be...
I had the Honour duly to receive your highly esteemed favour re commendatory of my Narrative, under date of 23d July last.—It would have given me great pleasure, to become personally acquainted with a Gentleman, who has been so preeminently favoured by Heaven, with extraordinary intellect, Virtue, talents, & strength of mind, whose life has been devoted to his countrys best interests, in...
Your esteemed favor of the 29 of April was duly received. In that you mention having received five numbers of the Alleghany Magazine. I have taken the liberty, which I hope you will excuse, to transmit all the numbers published, except the two last, which accompany this line. Please to accept them as a token of that respect, which I have been taught from early life to cherish for one, of whose...
As I returned home in safety in the course of this week, the first moments of leisure, after having informed my children and mr Busti of this happy event, shall be devoted, to acknowledge the favour of your’s of the first of Oct. In my former from Philadelphia I mentioned—how I was bruised—wounded—healed—and restored to perfect health—now I can only mention, and this, I am assured is a far...
Sensible of the honour I received by your permitting me to prefix your name to the second and third editions of this work, I am desirous that the present should appear under the same respectable and distinguished patronage. The talents and virtues which you have exhibited, both in public and private life, will, I trust, be duly appreciated by the rising generation; and it is my ardent wish,...
I take the liberty of sending to you the only copy entire , which I possess of the Discourse I delivered before the Humane Society last Spring. I have promised it to Mr Shaw ultimately, and when you have read it, if you will take that trouble I will thank you to give it to him I do not ask you to read the Discourse itself which is a trifling performance on the trite subject of Charity, but the...
Oh! that I had Eyes and Fingers for a little Badinage! When you cannot keep your Chin above water, I advise you to apply to the Hospital for the Sane.—Vid Dr Rush passim, and a pritty thing in the North American Review, by young Mason—The great Docter Johnson and Rush agree that we are all a little cracked. This only a Few who can be denominted Sane, and those only quad hor—For these Mason has...