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After closing my Letter yesterday Mr G. Harrison called on us and sat with us near an hour—He is a singular being and has a very energetic style of conversation thickly beset with ornaments now nearly exploded—There is however something odd in his manner—Speaking of the Post Master here—He said that he was a defaulter to a large amount and that he believed it was only for the sake of his Wife...
August 30 It is worth while to be absent a short time from home for the sake of receiving such delightful Letters as yours and Georges of to day, not to mention Mr. Smiths; when you condescend to trifle you trifle so prettily it were almost to be wished that your gaiété de cœur could be more frequently called pretty—Georges short trip to the Clouds was likewise of infinite service, and he...
Sept 1 My first visitor this day was the General who looks much better than he did and is I think in a fair way of doing well: though he will probably never entirely recover his pristine strength or firmness—He was inclined to be very communicative, and had entered upon political subjects pretty seriously, when young Mr. Paul came in and stopped the conversation—He said he hoped that you and...
Your journals down to the 30th of August inclusive are received; and this day the memoirs of Lord Waldegrave for George—It comes quite apropos; for we are now all enjoying the Memoirs of Horace Walpole embracing the same and a longer period, Lord Holland the Editor of this latter work sent a copy of it most magnificently bound as a present to the President who has been kind enough to lend it...
Sept 3. The Evening closed with a very heavy thundergust After which we had a most delicious evening—During the last Night there was an alarm of Fire, and for two hours the City was in an uproar—I do not know to what extent the damage amounted, and have only heard that it began in a Blacksmith’s shop and had been smothering throughout the day of Sunday—King Joseph and Mr. Anduago met it seems...
Do not suffer your failure to mortify you too much my dear John—It was accidental and must not prevent your future efforts—Fortune will at length smile propitious and reward your amiable exertions—I feel most sensibly for the pain you must have suffered and only wish I had been present to alleviate it—Your Father will perhaps be a little disappointed but your desire to excel will meet with its...
Mr. J. Hopkinson; Miss Dale, Mr Ewing; Miss Meredith, Miss Frazier, Mr Connell, and Mr N. Biddle, and Mary Mr. Knight, all called and delayed our dinner until three o clock—We had of course the greatest variety of conversation on almost all subjects excepting politicks; of which to my great satisfaction we had not a word—The Sketch of Old England is quite the rage but Ewing says Paulding is...
Yesterday afternoon at four, we performed the last sad offices of mortality to the remains of Mr. Josiah Meigs—It was but the Sunday week before, that happening accidentally to attend the Morning worship at the second Presbyterian Church I had seen him there ordained a Ruling Elder —He was suddenly seized yesterday was a week, immediately after returning early in the morning from Alexandria,...
Another attack of St Anthony confines me to my chamber since I wrote last and as it has been attended by head ache &c. with considerable fever I put myself into the hands of the Doctor; who is in hopes of eradicating the complaint altogether, though it is so stubborn it will require time, patience, and some confinement to my chamber—You have been too long accustomed to see me suffer in this...
Mr & Mrs. Bache Mrs. Dallas, and Mr U S. Capt Biddle called but I did not see them—Your letter was brought me, and you need not fear my leaving it about; as I am in the habit of filing and locking up my letters immediately after reading them—it is true that there are great machinations against you at this time going forward; and that they must and will continue as the time draws nearer which...
The day before yesterday after an anxious interval of two days without a line from you, brought me your Letter announcing your confinement to your chamber by the visit of that Saint far famed for the success of his Sermons to the fishes. I hope he has not taken offence at my partiality for the fisherman , and resolved to avenge my attachment to them upon you—If Dr Physick can give a final...
Yesterday passed without any material change—Mrs. Harrison called and Major Jackson and in the afternoon Mr. & Mrs. Walsh but I did not see them—They have just returned from Baltimore—Doctor Physick informed me that he hoped my brothers health would be firmly re-established in the course of a short time—I think it probable however he will operate once more— This morning I ventured down stairs...
Nothing worthy of Notice occurred yesterday, excepting a visit from Mrs. Hopkinson; and a Letter from Hariet Welsh brought by Miss H. Otis, who is come to this place to Nurse Mrs. Delavand whose recovery is deemed impossible—Miss Welsh informs me in her Letter, that John is gaining in standing at Cambridge: but I do not know what sources of information she has , although she states it to be...
No Journal received this day—But there was one yesterday, and I hope for one to-morrow—We have had now a week of heat as oppressive as any of the whole Summer, and two or three of the Nights have been more so. Though I have no doubt, you find it equally insupportable at Philadelphia, it reconciles me to your stay there; because I would have you come home to a temperate climate, as well as to...
I have been so unwell it has not been in my power to answer your last Letter—Poor John—Has the belle passion again seized his imagination it is not yet time for it to occupy his heart —Is this the cause of his poetic ardour and his fits of absence—Tell him I shall be much hurt if he does not write me soon for though I will make all possible allowance for love I must not be forgotten— Your...
16 Sept Finding myself very weak after my tedious confinement to my chamber I determined to accept the invitation of Mrs. Hopkinson, and took my passage in the Steam Boat accompanied by Mary—The day was fine but contrary to our usual good fortune, we found no one with whom to have a chat, excepting an old Quaker Lady; who was on her travels for the first time in her life; and full of terrors,...
19 Sept My last I believe closed on this day; I will therefore continue the account of our proceedings—While we were at Table the Count and his daughter paid us a visit and left Cards—and in the Evening we received an invitation to a water party at four o’clock tomorrow afternoon; and to spend the Evening which we graciously accepted. After which we strolled to the burying ground, where Miss...
Your beautiful letter of the 8th has given me great pleasure I call it beautiful because the style is handsome and handwriting marvellous for you. You cannot be in a better school than when writing for Your Father. You will return to Your Studies with greater pleasure after having written for him George! I have read I believe in Anacharsis a law of one of the democratic republics of Greece I...
I have received much satisfaction from the reports of your conduct since you left me. I have received still more pleasure from the constancy & punctuality of your correspondence with your parents, sister & Brother: & your letter to me of 12 crowns all. I thank you for the pamphlet you sent me containing the journal of your excursion to Concord which is very particular entertaining &...
Nothing but the want of Sight has delay’d the acknowledgement of your most kind Letter of the 24th Ultimo—it reminded me of an Inscription Cut out of the frontace piece of a Church, I went to see at Millnor viz Full, & Intire Indulgences, Granted for all Sins, Past, Present, & to come—what can I say in return—only that it is impossible I thus can say or willingly do any thing Not for a moment,...
21 Sept Still at Borden Town methinks I hear you say? “I hope my dear your head is not quite turned by all the fine things you meet?” I answer I hope not, but almost fear to ask myself the question—My last I believe informed you of the party at Mont Point Breeze. This Eveng the Count and his family spent here with Mrs. Hopkinson; and we laboured hard to amuse them, and I fear did not atchieve...
Your journal of the 16th. 17th. and 18th. from Bordentown was doubly grateful, for being unexpected—I am delighted to learn that you have been passing your time so agreeably; particularly as it was relaxation so necessary to you after so much confinement at Philadelphia. We have been called again to the House of Mourning, and on Friday attended the funeral of Mrs Macomb, at Georgetown. She...
You have been made acquainted with the controversy in which I have been for some Months engaged in relation to transactions at the Negotiation of Ghent. As the subject is one in which the defence of my own character and that of two of my Colleagues was inseparably connected with principles of deep concernment to this Union, I have thought it necessary to collect in one publication the papers...
24 Sept We dined at the Counts and while walking in the garden he told me an excellent anecdote of a beautiful Quaker Lady who had paid him a visit—During their promenade in the Garden they came to the figures of Cupid and Psyche who are represented looking tenderly at each other. She turned to him with great naiveté and said, “had she been so situated” she would not have remained long in that...
il m’a été bien pénible Madame de partir sans vous revoir et sans scavoir si Je pouvois vous être bonne à quelque chose sûr cet ancien continent que vous aimez et où l’on aimeroit tant a vous revoir, Je viens donc vous demandez vos commitions qu’il me seroit si agréable de remplir puisque ce seroit un Moyen de me rapeller au Souvenir d’une des personnes que Je regrette le plûs d’avoir quitées...
Upon your return to Cambridge at the beginning of your Senior year, I wish to remind you of your father’s hopes and wishes by a word of encouragement and advice—Although upon the half-yearly list in June last your standing in your Class was not so high as you had expected, and I had flattered myself it would be, yet the testimonial of President Kirkland, both with regard to your conduct, and...
27 Sept—In the Evening the Count and Countess came to visit us and sat above an hour conversing very pleasantly though not very favourably of Miss Keene who appears to be no favorite with him notwithstanding her evident desire to attract his attention—The young Lady seems to have taken a sort of partiality for me; and politely expressed a wish that I would prolong my stay in Borden Town as my...
Your last Journals yet received, are of the 23d (last Monday) from Border Town—You were then engaged for Wednesday, at Mrs Lenox’s and I had concluded you would return to Philadelphia on Thursday—Yesterday therefore, and again this day, I was expecting a Letter from you, after your return. But Thursday came on here, what we take for the equinoctial Storm, and it is hardly yet over—If it came...
It is my intention to return to you early next week unless my Dr. forbids; I will therefore beg you to send me some Cash to pay his bill although I fear you will think me very extravagant—. I am so surrounded by company, that I have not been able to continue my journal—Going this Even’ to Mrs. Hopkinson’s and to Mrs. Manego’s—Elopements appear to be the fashion among the medical tribe—Dr...
2 October The day was so stormy we were entirely shut up but I received several visits notwithstanding—Miss Verplank and her father Mr. Lee &c and Mr. Connell who intends to visit Washington in a short time. We are becoming dull and fretful and I expect to embrace you on Tuesday or Wednesday next at farthest—Dr Physick is unwilling to part with me as I have gone through the operation but he...
It is long since I had the pleasure of writing to you or of receiving a Letter from you; yet there has not been a day when you have been absent from my mind and from my heart. I learnt with sorrow and great anxiety that you had been sick, and hope that you have entirely recovered. The accounts that I received of your proficiency were that you had improved in your standing with the Class, and...
When I closed my last sheet I expected to be laid up again but Dr. Physick has decided that it is unnecessary at present and I am still at large. He has however determined to operate on my brother again tomorrow morning which will delay our return untill the middle of the week. I went out and returned several visits and afterwards took a family dinner at Walsh’s where I met de Menou Mr. Allen...
Still in this City I again write you and probably for the last time until I get home—Your last Letter pleased me very much I discovered more attention to composition and an easier and more correct style than in any before received—Your time will now however be so constantly occupied that you will have but little leisure to form a continued correspondence with me but I shall expect to hear from...
6 October Mr. Smith called to make a visit to my brother, stating to me, that he was so interesting a man he was desirous to become acquainted with him; to all of which of course I assented—I am trying to read Madlle. Le Norman’s memoirs of the Empress Josephine, which however I find so inflated and bombastic, I cannot read much at a time—It is lent me by Mrs. Manigault, and I must peruse it...
I thank you for the present of your Book and your kind letter of the 24th. September. It was wisely done to collect all those papers together and arrange them in order that posterity might see them in one view without ransacking twenty libraries for the newspapers and the pamphlets of the day. Without this prudent precaution they would probably have never been all read by any one individual....
Your Letter and Journal to the 3d. have come to hand. If I should give you the reasons why I cannot go and spend a week at Philadelphia to shew my friends there how much I long to be President, you would think them very ridiculous, and me not less so for detailing them—My friends at Philadelphia, are not the only ones who send me kind messages to inform me that unless I mend my manners, I...
David Hinckley Esqr of Boston and his amiable Daughter are about to travel in England. I earnestly recommend them to your particular and assiduous attention especially the accomplished Miss Ann and I pray you to introduce them in my Name as well as Your own to the Excellent American Minister and his Lady They will furnish you with ample details of all the News current in this Country Your...
I have received your letter of the 23d ulto. & your father’s letter & octavo volume mentioned in it The book will answer for itself wherever it goes & I hope will satisfy the world. If you take the “Old Colony Memorial” you will see some ancient documents concerning the fisheries, if you do not take that paper I hope you will subscribe for it, for it is of great importance to the history of...
We have an interesting question whether by the “middle of the week” which in your Journal of last Saturday you mentioned as the time when you expected to reach home, you intended the middle of this week or of the next—If of the present it is already here; but then your last Journal which is of Tuesday, was written in expectation of hearing from one, which you doubtless did the next Morning. I...
I sent you from Philadelphia an odd volume of A Sketch of Old England which I wrote your name in and addressed to Quincy—The second was stolen from me but as their some good matter in the first and as it is a book in which there is no history to break it would be worth reading though it cannot rank as a perfect work in your collection—I shall soon send you the favorite of Nature which is said...
Mrs. Adams requests the favour of Baron Stackelberg’s company at Tea on Wednesday 1/2 past seven MHi : Charles Edward French Autograph Collection.
John in his last Letter to me tells me that you make a secret of my Letters to you and will not let him see them—I did not think you were so boyish more especially since you have become a Sophomore—Do not then embitter by such nonsense the hours you have to spend together and be assured that the affection of your Mother is so equally divided between her Sons that each is the equal object of...
Your last is written under such disagreeable circumstances it partook a good deal of your general discomfort in its tone and expression. I have therefore delayed my answer until your difficulties shall be smoothed and your usual equanimity returned when I know my Letter will be welcome and you will not misconstrue the affectionate anxiety of Parents who have perhaps an exaggerated idea of the...
I have received your Letter of the12th. instt. In the Letter to which it was the answer, it was not my intention either to grieve you, or to threaten you with the loss of your visit to Washington, during the next vacation—It was only to encourage you by the success of your former exertions and to exhort you, by my own anxious wish for your own credit and reputation, to persevering and...
In replying to your Letter of the 12th. instt. I might begin, by asking an explanation if its first paragraph—You say that you was taught to think when you came back from Europe, that your Letters were only an incumbrance—It has always given me pleasure to receive Letters from you, and I cannot imagine to what you refer in your supposition to the contrary—If the assurance is necessary from me...
I am so concerned at the style of your last Letter I hasten to answer it immediately although I have not had it more than an hour. Your health which is so precious to both your father and myself is our first care the state of your mind the next—If the first I charge you to take great care. You know the remedies I always apply for a cough as unfortunately you have had too much experience of...
left B——e and arrived at this place the first of Octr. after an absence of 5 weeks and two days. I shall leave here for Boston on Christmas day shall be in Baltimore the 27 and as the Steamboats between there and Philadelphia will probably have stopt running before that time opt by land to P——a. we shall pass each other some where on the road if you will let me know at the houses you put up at...
I enclose under cover to you a Packet, addressed to R. H. Crewe Eqr. etct, etct, etct, Office of Ordnance—Pall Mall—London—And a Letter directed to Mr William A Beckett—Solicitor N. 20 Golden Square London—I will thank you to cause them to be delivered at their respective destinations, requesting receipts for them, which I beg you further to transmit to me Yours faithfully. MHi : Adams Family...
I have forwarded to you a Copy of the Additional Census of Alabama, in virtue of an Act of Congress of the 7th. of March last; the receipt of which you will be pleased to acknowledge. I have the honour to be, very respectfully, / Sir, / Your obedt: & very hu. Servt. MHi : Adams Papers.
I have received your Letter of the 2d. instt and trusting entirely to the faithfulness of the account which you give in it, of your own conduct, am prepared as I have before promised you to make every allowance for the interruption of your studies occasioned by your infirm state of health—Hoping that it is now permanently recovered, I flatter myself you will make henceforth the proper use of...