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This certifies that Edward D. Hobbs is a Member for life, of the American Colonization Society. R R Gurley [seal] Secretary ( ICHi ).
Richmond mail Arrives Mondays Wednesdays & Frydays at 7 in morning Departs Tuesdays, Thursdays & Saturdays at 2 in afternoon sometimes goes sunday mornings at 9 Oclock in morning Frederecksburg mail Arrives & Departs same time Staunton mail arrives when others departs & goes when others arrive Ms enclosed in JM to Alexander Garrett, April 18, 1827: by Mrs. Madison? (ViU) .
"Nefas videri" Montpelier in November 1827. Montpelier Nov. 27. 28. 29. 30. 1827. a. Mr M. observed that A. Everett in his book on America had fallen into the remarkable error that Gen. Washington had to be greatly persuaded by Hamilton to agree to the Constitution. Mr M. knew it to be an error; he lodged with Wash. in Philad. during the convention. b. On manufactures. He observed that the...
Office of the Colonization Society This certifies that the Hon. Daniel Waldo is a Member for life, of the American Colonization Society. (MWA) .
All Govts. hitherto bad: either tending to despotism, or to anarchy & thro’ that to despotism. The expedt. of fedl. repub: aiming at a security agst both, merits a fair experiments, and the good wishes of all. [It h]as worked well as yet. It has controul’d the Genl Govt. thro the States, as in al: & sedn. laws, and the States when flying individually out of [thorn] yr. orbits have under the...
a paper prepared by Mr. Madison a short time before his death, in which he re-examined the question of the power to establish a Bank—written in consequence of its having been represented, that his signature of the Bank bill proceeded from a change of opinion on his part, of the constitutional power of Congress on that subject— Ms (fragment) (ViU) .
Report on the University of Virginia We lay before our readers the following interesting View of the condition of the University of Virginia, submitted to the Legislature on Monday last: I have the honor to lay before the General Assembly, the report adopted by the Rector and Visitors of the University of Virginia, at their meeting in July last, and received by me as President of the Literary...
Resolved that the Rector be authorized to appoint to the Chair of Antient Languages, for the term of one year from the date of Such appointment, with a salary not exceeding $1000, & with the usual fees paid to that chair, either of the following persons, they being preferred by the Board in the order herein named; that is to say: Dr Gessner Harrison, M. L. Tracie, R. Reynolds; and if neither...
Being satisfied from observation and experience, as well as from medical testimony, that ardent spirit as a drink, is not only needless, but hurtful; and that entire disuse of it would tend to promote the health, the virtue and happiness of the community, we hereby express our conviction, that would the citizens of the United States, and especially the Young Men , discontinue the use of it,...
Front March 27 1836. Forwarded for the Lawrville Lyceum at the request in its name, of a Book from my library, and as a token of the respect I feel for an Institute patronizing youthful talent Back to the youth of a free country < >, on a subject particularly adap< > Fragment (NjMoHP) .
List of autographs [by James Madison:] Autographs sent [by Dolley Payne Madison:] G. Washington John Adams Thomas Jefferson James Monroe John Quincy Adams A. Hamilton Robert R. Livingston Albert Gallatin Edw. Livingston Richard Peters John Page Edmd. Pendleton Wm. Pinkney Timothy Pickering Lafayette Le Baron de Humboldt Du pont de Nemours Peter S. Du Ponceau. 18—
Wednesday the 14th. Present the same members, & Chapman Johnson and Joseph C. Cabell. On motion resolved; That the sentence of the Faculty pronounced on the 22d. of May in the present year expelling John Willis, a student of the University, is approved; and that the sentence pronounced on the 4th. of the same month expelling the student, Robert W. Walton, is also approved. Resolved, That a...
I rejoice to find you engaged in your latter days, in so laudable an undertaking as that of perfecting a system for the education of our youth: an estabilishement much wanted on your side of the mountains: and which must hereafter prove a great blessing to our posterity. But, what has astonished me more than all the miracles of Moses , is, that the birth state of Washington , Jefferson ,...
I write to you on a subject which I think of great importance and because in your life I think you have done a great deal of good because you are in a situation to do much on the subject which I shall mention, and because I think you have been a friend to the people, in stead of favoring a chosen few—You will not Sir, think this a piece of flatery; my situation forbids it—but few Years have...
At a meeting of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia , held on the 27 th ultimo Thomas Jefferson of Monticello was duly elected a Corresponding member. The object of this institution being the promotion of all the various branches of Natural Science, especially the investigation of the natural productions of the United States , we shall be happy to receive, and communicate any...
The ACADEMY of Natural Sciences OF PHILADELPHIA HAVE ELECTED Thomas Jefferson a Correspondent of their ASSOCIATION this Twenty Seventh day of January 1818 W m Maclure , President Reuben Haines , Corresponding Zaccheus Collins Secretary Vice Presidents Will m
Extract from the Minutes of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia; Feb y 2, 1819. ‘D r Hare read a paper on a new instrument by which he considers that it is shewn, that the heat produced by the Salvanie apparatus, is not the effect of electricity; but a collateral result of the laws which produce the motion of this fluid. ‘Twenty copper & twenty zinc plates were supported vertically...
I received your letter on Thursday and was delighted to find it so long, for you do not know how much pleasure it gives me to read one of your good long letters. I am glad you mentioned Sisters bonnet, and you shall have it as soon as possible, but we must consult together at home what is best for the Bell of Washington, for we hear she is the greatest lady there. You mention in your letter...
Your Journal No 7. to Janry 30th, Harriet brought me to day, just as we had sat down to dinner; It being thursday, John and Charles thought they would treat themselves, and miss Harriet with a Sleigh ride to Quincy—our Friends and acquaintance do not fail to improve the Season, and sometimes come upon us a little unwarily, for one day last week, I had nine at once to dine, when I knew only of...
Your Letter of May 2d was so long comeing, that I feared Sickness had arrested your pen—as Subjects for the use of it are always within your power, because subjects of a domestic Nature are every day occurences, and always interesting to Friends. and judging by myself, I communicate to you the pleasure I enjoy in finding that your admonitions to George have had a salutary effect, both as it...
Susan has written you, I Suppose that mr Clark has returnd, and that he is very desirious of being married. She has also informd you of his income and means of Support. Will you under these Circumstances consent to their being married at present? They are Young, neither of them disposed to Habits of dissipation, but Such limited means I fear will involve them in difficulties. To keep House...
The fine Sleighing has tempted So many visitors to make use of it, that we have had a Constant Succession of company, altho the weather has been Severely cold—This day thus far, I have not been interrupted, and I take my pen, to acknowledge your favour of Febry 4th received upon the 12th. on that day Mrs Quincy with miss Storer & miss Quincy, came to take Tea with us. John and Charles, having...
Agreable to your Request we have concluded to Send you the picture. Mr Adams has been So occupied by public Buisness that he has not given any directions respecting it.—but as we know it will receive the greatest care from you; we have concluded to commit it to you; relying upon the promise given, that you will deliver it to our Son John Quincy Adams, when ever he calls for it— With...
I will not let so good an opportunity pass without writing you a few Lines, to inquire after your Health, and to rejoice with you upon the return of your Sister, and Family to America, in good health, and with a more youthfull countanance than when She left us—but like Birds of passage, they left us, in one month for Washington— your three Nephews are with us George who has grown to the...
I have not noticed your Letter bearing date 10 Novb’r—I had begun to think that you had renounced me as a correspondent—not having had a line from you for a long time—Like other Ladies who when Slighted turn their Backs or otherways express their Sense of it I did not feel myself obligated to write again—and gratified myself by reading Your Letters to Your Grandfather, and discharging my duty...
I received your journal No 4. containing the drawing Room History, which amused us much. What would have been Said in my day, if So much Style, pomp and Etiquette had been assumed? the Cry of Monarchy, Monarchy, would have resounded from Georgia to Maine.—but according to the old proverb—some persons may Rob; better than others look over the hedge.—I am not condemning this new order of...
Thank you thank you dear Harriet for the Letter from mr Adams you sent me last Evening. tho only a few lines, it informd me that after a passage of 50 days from Cowes they had arrived all well—and should remain no longer in N york than to get out their baggage & necessary arrangements, that in a week or ten days they would be here—I presume by the close of the week or sooner—It will indeed be...
But once Since You left us, have I received a line from you. Twice I have written, and twenty hundred times twenty; thought of you, and Sometimes with an exclamation, what can be the reason that H. does not write? now you who have Eyes, fingers at command, and the pen of a ready writer, ought to employ them, when they are So much Sought after. I presume they are so: and that you have Some...
What right have I to be one of your tormentors? and amongst the numerous applicants for introductory Letters? Why I will plead, old acquaintance, old Friendship and your well known Benevolence—but to the Subject of my present address. Mr Theodore Lyman, who possesses an ardent thirst for Literature, and whose Father, is one of our most respectable Characters for probity, honour, & wealth, this...
I am indebted to you, for two very kind Letters The first, was written after my Grandaughter miss de Wint, had made you a visit. I ought to have inform’d you, how much She regreted, that it was not in her power to repeat it, and writing to me upon her return, that She was gratified in having visited a Lady, whom She knew; was much esteemd by her Grand Parents: as well as by her own Father, and...