You
have
selected

  • Recipient

    • Monroe, James
  • Period

    • post-Madison Presidency

Author

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 7

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Recipient="Monroe, James" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency"
Results 51-100 of 166 sorted by author
I thank you, dear Sir, for the opportunity of perusing the inclosed, which I return without delay. it looks well, and when they know the whole of the affair of Pensacola , I have no doubt they will withdraw all idea of intermedling between Spain & us. I think trust we shall be able to avoid entanglement with the European alliance. we may let them alone for they can n ot conquer the S....
Your favor of the 13 th was recieved yesterday. your use of my letter with the alterations subsequently proposed, needs no apology. and it will be a gratification to me if it can be of any service to you. I learn with sincere affliction the difficulties with which you have still to struggle—mine are considerable—but the single permission given me by the legislature of such a mode of sale as...
I forward to you the inclosed letter on the same ground on which it is addressed to me, and not that Duane has any Moral claims on us. his defection from the republican ranks, his transition to the Federalists, and giving triumph, in an important state, to wrong over right, have dissolved, of his own seeking, his connection with us. yet the energy of his press, when our cause was laboring, and...
The wine called Scuppernon (or some name like that) is made as I am informed on the South side of Albemarle Sound , on & near a creek of that name. it is easily procured by a correspondent in Norfolk with which place Scuppernon has a short and direct communication by water. I had asked the favor of mr H. G. Burton of N. Carolina to procure me a correspondent from whom I could get regular...
The reciept of a commission as Visitor , will have informed you, if you did not know it before, that we have in contemplation to establish a College near Charlottesville . by the act of assembly which fixes our constitution , it is to be under the direction of 6. visitors. your commission has informed you you were one of these, & your colleagues are mr Madison , Gen l Cocke , mr Joseph C....
I have examined my letter of Jan. 13. 1803. as well as the indistinct copy given by the copying press permits. in some parts it is illegible. the publication of the whole of the 1 st paragraph would merit very serious consideration as respects myself. written when party passions and contests were at their highest, and expressing freely to you with whom I had no reserve, my opinion of the views...
You have seen announced in several of our papers an intention of the Polonese nation to erect a monument near Cracow to the memory of Gen l Koscuzko, and their wish that England and the US. by joining in contributions, might give a proof of the interest they take in his character; that for this purpose, they had addressed a letter to L d Holland in Engl d and to myself in the US. I recieved in...
I thank you, Dear Sir, for the opportunity of reading mr Taylor’s letter, which I now return. news that one can rely on from a country with which we have so little intercourse, and so much mutual interest is doubly grateful. I rejoice to learn that Iturbide’s is a mere usurpation and slenderly supported. altho we have no right to intermeddle with the form of government of other nations yet it...
My friend Col o Peyton, passing thro’ Washington on a trip to the North, will pay his respects to you with this letter. he is the same for whom I have heretofore sollicited you, and still sollicit you to keep him in mind for either of the two offices in Richmond which may first become vacant. I shall hope a fortnight or three weeks previous notice of your visit to this neighborhood that I may...
Amant Spreafico , of Nice , to be Consul of that place instead of Victor Adolphus Sasserno deceased. The above is the name of the person at Nice who wishes to be our Consul. he is a very respectable merchant of the place, was connected in the commerce of Sasserno the father , was left guardian of Sasserno the son , the late Consul, and still I believe continues in the same firm & business....
I have been lately visited by a mr Miralla, a native of Buenes Ayres, but resident in Cuba for the last 7. or 8. years, a person of intelligence, of much information, and frankly communicative. I believe indeed he is known to you. I availed myself of the opportunity of learning what was the state of public sentiment in Cuba as to their future course. he says they would be satisfied to remain...
I inclose you a letter from Thomas Lieper, the Doyen, you know of the genuine republicans of Pensylva, who, on the prospect that the Director of the mint is about closing the term of his life, wishes that Doct r Patterson son of the Director, could be appointed his successor. my testimony in his favor is not from personal acquaintance, but from the information of others which is very highly in...
I recieve mr Livingston’s question through you with kindness, and answer it without hesitation. he may be assured I have not a spark of unfriendly feeling towards him. in all the earlier scenes of life we thought and acted together. we differed in opinion afterwards on a single point. each maintained his opinion, as he had a right, and acted on it as he ought. but why brood over a single...
I recieved last night a letter from Cathalan of Aug. 13. informing me he had just recieved some boxes of wine for me from Sasserno , who, of course was then living: but he had not yet recieved his Consular commission. it will be better therefore to await further information, and the rather as, if he be dead, I shall be sure to hear it from Cathalan or Spreafico . perhaps indeed it might be...
I this moment only receive your letter of the 17th. Mine by this mail renders nothing more necessary in answer to it. I understand Mr. Crawford is so far recovered that he hopes to be on the road for Washington in a few days. His weakness I presume will make his journey very slow. Sending this with some other letters by an extra messenger who will hardly reach the P. Office in time I add only...
I thank you for the copy of your Message. The moderation it breathes towards Spain will be approved generally at present, & universally hereafter. The time is passed when this policy could be ascribed to any other than its true motive. The present standing of the U.S. will secure to it a just interpretation every where. It is very satisfactory to learn that the greatest powers in Europe are...
Your favor of Jany. 26. came duly to hand. The information I wish to be obtained from Genl. Jackson is 1st. What was the form & dates of the appointments of Brigadier, and of Brevet Major General, accepted by him in his letter of June 8th. 1814. to the Secy. of war; and what the date of the Secretary’s letter inclosing the appointments. The term “form” refers to the distinction between...
Yours of the 1st. inst: came on slowly. I return the letter from Mr. Ingersoll whose continued drudgery in his profession, would be to be lamented, if his release from it would ensure such fruits of his literary pen, as one of his discourses to the Society, Philosophical (I think), which contained the ablest & most valuable Tableau of the Condition of the U. S. that has been published. I...
I have recd. a letter from H. Lee dated Nashville Aug. 24. stating that he had corresponded with Genl. Armstrong on the subject of the provisional order to Genl. Jackson of July 18. 1814, authorizing him on certain conditions to take possession of Pensacola; which order was not recd. by the General till on or about the 14th. of March 1815; and then open, and the envelope without postmark; and...
I have recd. from Mr. Jefferson your letter to him, with the correspondence between Mr. Canning & Mr. Rush, sent for his and my perusal, and our opinions on the subject of it. From the disclosures of Mr. Canning it appears, as was otherwise to be inferred, that the success of France agst. Spain would be followed by attempts of the Holy Alliance to reduce the revolutionized colonies of the...
The inclosed is of little consequence, but you will see that it ought to have been addressed to you. Dr. Eustis & his lady having given us a call, it was agreed that he & myself shd. make a short visit to Mr. Jefferson of whose state of health, I had never been able to get any precise information. We found him substantially restored from his indisposition, with good appetite, and in the daily...
A most distressing picture has been presented to me of the condition of Mr. Cathcart and his numerous family, in the hope that as his official services which have had such a termination, were rendered whilst the Executive administration was in my hands, I might be induced to say something in his behalf. It is impossible to learn his actual distress and alarming prospects without sympathy; but...
Your favor of July 27. from Plattsburg was duly received, and I am very glad to learn from it, that the fatiguing scenes through which you have passed, had not prevented some improvement in your health. The sequel of your journey will have been still more friendly to it, as affording a larger proportion of the salutary part of your exercise. I hope you will find an ample reward for all the...
In the hurry of acknowledging yours of Ocr. 17. recd. at the last moment of the opportunity for the post office, I did not advert to the passage relating to enquiries to be made of Genl. Jackson. I hope you have not delayed your intended letter to him on that account. I should suppose it might be quite proper to ask from him copies of the documents appointing him Brigadier or Majr. General by...
I have recd. your favor of the 13th. I beg that you will not think of the pecuniary subject till it be in every respect, perfectly convenient to you. The real sense of the nation with regard to the Revolutionary struggle in S. America can not, I should suppose, be mistaken. Good wishes for its success, and every lawful manifestation of them, will be approved by all, whatever may be the...
I have recd. yours of the 7th. You will not doubt that our sympathies have been fully with you during the afflictions which have befallen you. I think you have done well in chusing your present situation, & for the reasons you express. I hope you will experience from it all the improvement which your health needs, and every advantage promised by it. My fear is that the Winter may be too rude...
Your favor of the 22d. has been duly recd. I am so much aware that you have not a moment to spare from your public duties, that I insist on your never answering my letters out of mere civility. This rule I hope will be applied to the present as well as future letters. My quere as to the expedition agst. Amelia Island turned solely on the applicability of the Executive Power to such a case....
I have rcd. your favor of the 3d. I am much obliged by the kind manner in which you speak of my Nephew. I hope you will always consider expressions of my good will in such cases as perfectly subordinate to public considerations, and superi[o]r pretensions. In the present case I am not sure that the appt. of my nephew to the place in question ought to be desired even by himself, unless Col:...
A letter from Mrs. Dallas has just come under my eye, by which I find she is subsisting on very scanty resources, and is under impressions that two of her sons particularly, are not as well off as the public services of their father, and their own personal worth had promised. The elder one belonging to the Navy has, it seems, been a considerabl⟨e⟩ time without a ship. The other, George, tho’...
Your favor of the 18th. was handed to me by your servant, at a moment & place which did not permit me to acknowlege it by him. We regretted very much the circumstances which deprived us of the expected pleasure of seeing you all on your way to Washington. I inclose the copy of your letter to Gen: Jackson. Your reasonings on the singular step taken by him can scarcely fail to convince him of...
I have duly recd. yours of the 27th. Ulto. I am very sorry that I shall not be able to have the pleasure of joining you at the Meeting of the Visitors. We must await therefore that of seeing you & Mrs. M. on your way to Washington; and hope you will set out in time to spare us some days. The communications from Mr. Rush are very interesting. G. B. seems so anxious to secure the general trade...
Yours of Feby. 23. was not recd. before the last mail tho’ having the Aldie post mark on the day of its date. Whether it was not duly forwarded, or was so long overlooked at the office here is not known. The latter was probably the case. We hope the agreeable information you gave of Mrs. Monroe’s convalescence has been justified by, her entire recovery. I need not now say that I recd. at the...
Among the names which are presented for consideration in filling the vacant Chair in the University is that of Thomas H. Levins, now of New York, formerly of the District of Columbia, where he was Professor of Mathematics in the College. Letters in his favor are recd. from Mr. Calhoun, Genl. McComb, and Mr. A. H. Powell who I suppose is the present Member of Congress of that name. Whatever be...
I have recd. from Mr. Lear engaged in settling the accounts of General Hull, a request of what I may recollect on the question, whether there was a stipulation or understanding, that the General was to receive his salary as Governour, as well as his military pay. I have simply answered that my memory does not furnish any evidence which ought to influence the decision of the question. As the...
I recd. yours of the 10th. with a full sense of your kindness in taking so much interest in my health. Subsequent to your call on me, I had a return of fever which reduced me to a state of greater weakness than I had before experienced. For several weeks passed, have been on the recovery in strength as well as health; and if no relapse takes place, I may be able to give my attendance at...
I recd by the last mail a letter from J. H. Causten, accompanied by a huge volume of Documents, and a stout pamphlet of arguments, with a printed letter to him from Mr. Pickering, on the mercantile claims agst. France and the release of her from them by the U.S. All these articles have been doubtless sent to you also, as I am requested by Mr. C. to forward the inclosed Certificate of Agency,...
I have duly recd. your favor of the 5th. followed by a copy of the public documents; for which I give you many thanks. I should like to get a copy of the Journals of the Convention. Are they to be purchased & where? It appears to me, as it does to you, that a coupling of Missouri with Maine, in order to force the entrance of the former thro’ the door voluntarily opened for the latter is, to...
Mr. Morris who was employed for several years on a confidential Mission to Spain, observes to me that in executing the trust, he incurred expences, particularly in being transferred from Cadiz to Madrid, and during his residence at the latter place, which in the then circumstances of Spain were great beyond foresight, and moreover in providing a Clerk for whose services he had occasion: and he...
Mr. Ths. Lehré of S. C. is a candidate for the vacant Collectorship of Charleston, and writes that I shd bear some testimony to you in favor of his pretensions. Not having any personal knowlege of him this can relate only to his political sentiments and conduct as they were from time to time communi[ca]ted to me, and to the general standing which I have understood him to possess with his...
Since we left the university I have recd. the letter from Mr. Gallatin, of which the inclosed is a copy. It gives no prospect of a supply for the vacant chair from that quarter, and I have no additional information from any other. A few lines from Mr. Ringold as he passed thro’ the neighbourhood, mentioned that you had suffered a sharp attack after you reached home not unlike mine, but was,...
Your favor of the 9th. did not come to hand till the evening before the last. From a communication just had with my nephew, I find that he is anxious not to lose the chance of the Secretariship to the Board under the Treaty, and seems to be encouraged in his hopes by his friend Col: Barbour. It will be agreeable to him therefore, if not objectionable, that his appt. to the other place you...
Mr. Jesse B Harrison of Lynchburg offers himself as Successor to Mr. Long in the professorship of Antient Languages; and if satisfied, by the concuring opinions of the Visitors, separately expressed that he may expect the appointment, intends to embark immediately for Germany at his own expence, in order to avail himself of the peculiar opportunities there afforded for improving his...
I recd. by the last mail yours of the 18th. You were not more surprized than I had a right to be at seeing our names on the Electoral Ticket. After my letter to you, which you made known to Col. Mercer, I wrote to Mr. Cabell in the most decided terms, and he informs me he made the proper use of it. I have a letter from Col. Mercer also, corresponding doubtless with his to you. The awkwardness...
On my arrival here last evening I learnt that you had reachd home the day before yesterday. I am sorry I could not have the pleasure of seeing you at Montpellier on your way, And the regret is increased by the circumstances which prevent me from making the detour necessary to call on you. I left my mother much indisposed, and my sister Rose who was on a visit to her critically ill; and having...
I find that Mr. H. Carroll, son of Charles Carroll, who brought over the Treaty of Ghent, is very desirous, as is his father, that he should be appointed to a land office on the Missouri. You are so well acquainted with the worth of the latter both as a man and a patriot, and probably also with the character of the son, that I ought perhaps on that account alone to forbear saying a word on the...
A very near friend of Mr. Stone of Fredg. who is not ignorant of my having on former occasions testified my regard for his worth & his welfare, is very anxious that I should bring him again to your view. It seems that Mr. Stone has turned his thoughts & his hopes to the vacancy lately produced by the death of Col. Freeman; and the application to me has a more immediate reference to that...
My neighbour & your Acquaintance Mr Richard Taliaferro is desirous that one of his sons should receive a military education at West Point. His progress in the preparatory studies is certified by his present Tutor, and I have myself had a slight opportunity of witnessing that he has some knowledge of Latin. Of his general character I know nothing which is not favorable. If there be no bar to...
I have duly recd. yours of the . I considered the advertisement of your estate in Loudon as an omen that your friends in Virginia were to lose you. It is impossible to gainsay the motives to which you yielded in making N. Y. your residence, tho’ I fear that you will find its climate unsuited to your period of life and the State of your health. I just observe and with much pleasure, that the...
Your two letters of the 13 & 15th. inst came together by the last mail (Sunday evening) too late to be answered by its return on Monday morning. I had recd. the printed circular of Judge Brooke notifying our Electoral nominations, on thursday last, but in the night, and not to be answered by the return Mail, which passes our post office, between 5 & 6 miles distant, by day light. The printed...
Your favors of Mar. 27. & April   came duly to hand. You know already that I submit the recommendations which I can not sometimes decline, in entire subordination to your view of the comparative merits & pretensions before you. I think you perfectly right in not allowing locality to give exclusive claims to offices of general concern. I did not forget the name of Dr. Torrey, when in...