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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Monroe, James" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency"
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I have duly recd. yours of the . I considered the advertisement of your estate in Loudon as an omen that your friends in Virginia were to lose you. It is impossible to gainsay the motives to which you yielded in making N. Y. your residence, tho’ I fear that you will find its climate unsuited to your period of life and the State of your health. I just observe and with much pleasure, that the...
I have recd. yours of the 7th. You will not doubt that our sympathies have been fully with you during the afflictions which have befallen you. I think you have done well in chusing your present situation, & for the reasons you express. I hope you will experience from it all the improvement which your health needs, and every advantage promised by it. My fear is that the Winter may be too rude...
Yours of the 15th. was brought to me from the post=office, Mr. Watson having passed on without calling as you expected him to do. We lost therefore the information he was to give as to your health & that of your family Your silence favors the hope that it has improved. Let us have a proof however under your own hand. My health was again interrupted whilst I was at University, and I am yet not...
I have not heard a word from you or of you thro’ any Channel, since my letter of the . I augur favorably from this silence, as to your health, and hope to see you here by the 7 or 8th. of the approaching month. I am anxious for your attendance at the Meeting of the Visitors,(on the 10 th. of July), who will have sundry interesting matters before them, particularly the appointment of a...
I have just recd. yours of the 13th. We had been led to hope that your health was better established than you represent it. As it is progressive and your Constitution, tho’ like mine the worse for wear, has remains of good stamina, I will not despair of the pleasure of seeing you in July, and making a visit together to the University. Should prudence forbid such a journey, I think you ought...
The Nat. Intelligr. of the 19th. gave us the pleasure of finding that you had arrived at Washington in safety, and advancing in convalescence. We left Richd. full of anxiety, produced by the reported effect of what happened to the Steamboat, on your feeble condition I hope this will find you at Oakhill with continued improvement in yr. health and happy in that of Mrs. Monroe & all around you,...
I recd. yours of the 10th. with a full sense of your kindness in taking so much interest in my health. Subsequent to your call on me, I had a return of fever which reduced me to a state of greater weakness than I had before experienced. For several weeks passed, have been on the recovery in strength as well as health; and if no relapse takes place, I may be able to give my attendance at...
I have this moment recd. yours of the 25th., and having a casual oppy. to the P. O. this evening shall get an answr. into the mail tomorrow morning. The 10th. of July is as you suppose the day for the Meeting of the Visitors, and I shall look for you here in due time. It ought to be on the 8th. at the latest. I am glad to find you so successful in overcoming the successive attacks on your...
I have just recd. yours of the 31st. Ult. inclosing letters recomending Mr J. T. Tracy, and hasten to correct an error you have fallen into which affect[s] the University as well as yourself. It is on the tenth , not the fifteenth of July, that the Visitors are to meet. I address this to N. Y. where you will probably have arrived. It gives us pleasure to find that Mrs. M encounters the...
I have just recd. yours of April 28. I think as you do, that it will be best for us to decline attending the election in this Month, even in our own Counties; and I shall do so, unless it should appear that such a course will be particularly offensive. Of this there is not the least probability. On the contrary the public indications are, that elections on this extraordinary occasion ought to...
Yours of the 24th. just recd. has relieved us from the great anxiety we were suffering from the rumours of your illness. We had heard of the accident from your horse, but had also of your recovery from it. Mr. Giles makes use of the Hudibrastic gun, which does most harm by its recoil, it is said; with this difference indeed, that his cartridges being blank, the only possible effect, in the...
On the rect. of yours of the 5th. I wrote immediately to Mr. Trist, to forward you a copy of the Resolution you wish. Not having yet recd. the circular transcript of the Proceedings of the Session, I could not furnish one myself. I have desired Mr. Trist also to authenticate to you the day for the next meeting of the Visitors; for which my recollection assigns, the first day of October. You...
I have already apprised you of your mistake of the day for the meeting of the Visitors, which is the 10 th not the 15th. of July. I now wish you to know that we propose to pay a visit to Col: Lindsay, on our way, and on the following day, another. This will make it necessary to set out on Monday the 8th. You must not fail therefore to be here on the saturday or sunday preceding, and as much...
I have just recd. yours of the 31st. Ult. inclosing letters recommending Mr. Tracie, and hasten to correct an error you have fallen into which affects the University as well as yourself. It is on the tenth not the 15th. of July that the Visitors are to meet. I address this to N. York where you will probably have arrived. It gives us great pleasure to find that Mrs. Monroe encounters the...
Yours of Feby. 23. was not recd. before the last mail tho’ having the Aldie post mark on the day of its date. Whether it was not duly forwarded, or was so long overlooked at the office here is not known. The latter was probably the case. We hope the agreeable information you gave of Mrs. Monroe’s convalescence has been justified by, her entire recovery. I need not now say that I recd. at the...
Your two letters of the 13 & 15th. inst came together by the last mail (Sunday evening) too late to be answered by its return on Monday morning. I had recd. the printed circular of Judge Brooke notifying our Electoral nominations, on thursday last, but in the night, and not to be answered by the return Mail, which passes our post office, between 5 & 6 miles distant, by day light. The printed...
Yours of the 29th. Ult: was recd. by the last mail. I have not yet heard from Judge Brook, but may perhaps do so by the mail of this evening. The task imposed on us by the Convention is of so delicate a nature, that with their foreknowledge of our purpose, it ought to have been forborne. Your idea of alluding to the advantage of having the experienced Counsel of Ex. Presidts. in trying...
I recd. by the last mail yours of the 18th. You were not more surprized than I had a right to be at seeing our names on the Electoral Ticket. After my letter to you, which you made known to Col. Mercer, I wrote to Mr. Cabell in the most decided terms, and he informs me he made the proper use of it. I have a letter from Col. Mercer also, corresponding doubtless with his to you. The awkwardness...
I have recd. yours of the 10th. and return the correspondence between Col Mercer and yourself. Your letter to him of the 10th. was perfectly à propòs, and can not fail I think to answer my purpose as well as yours; the substance of it being applicable to both, and coinciding with the promise of Col. M. in his letter of Novr. 12. to guard me as well as you from the threatened embarrassment. It...
Yours of the 1st. inst: came on slowly. I return the letter from Mr. Ingersoll whose continued drudgery in his profession, would be to be lamented, if his release from it would ensure such fruits of his literary pen, as one of his discourses to the Society, Philosophical (I think), which contained the ablest & most valuable Tableau of the Condition of the U. S. that has been published. I...
Mr. Jesse B Harrison of Lynchburg offers himself as Successor to Mr. Long in the professorship of Antient Languages; and if satisfied, by the concuring opinions of the Visitors, separately expressed that he may expect the appointment, intends to embark immediately for Germany at his own expence, in order to avail himself of the peculiar opportunities there afforded for improving his...
Yours of the 2d. postmarked the 6th of November came duly to hand. I return the letters & papers inclosed in it. The fact stated to Mr. Ringold by Genl. Jessup, does not concern only or principally the question between Genl. Jackson & Mr. Southard. It belongs to the History of the Campaign and of the Administration; and as such ought to be verified & preserved. The General must of course have...
Yours of the 3d. instant, with copies of your two letters to Judge White now returned, were not received till they had made a trip to Montpellier in Vermont; as happened at the same time to three letters from our co=visitors of the University. The letter to you from Mr. Ringold, referred to as inclosed, was omitted. Your explanatory communications to Judge White are very important, and I hope...
I have recd. a letter from H. Lee dated Nashville Aug. 24. stating that he had corresponded with Genl. Armstrong on the subject of the provisional order to Genl. Jackson of July 18. 1814, authorizing him on certain conditions to take possession of Pensacola; which order was not recd. by the General till on or about the 14th. of March 1815; and then open, and the envelope without postmark; and...
Since we left the university I have recd. the letter from Mr. Gallatin, of which the inclosed is a copy. It gives no prospect of a supply for the vacant chair from that quarter, and I have no additional information from any other. A few lines from Mr. Ringold as he passed thro’ the neighbourhood, mentioned that you had suffered a sharp attack after you reached home not unlike mine, but was,...
Among the names which are presented for consideration in filling the vacant Chair in the University is that of Thomas H. Levins, now of New York, formerly of the District of Columbia, where he was Professor of Mathematics in the College. Letters in his favor are recd. from Mr. Calhoun, Genl. McComb, and Mr. A. H. Powell who I suppose is the present Member of Congress of that name. Whatever be...
Your two letters of Jany. 17 & 22. were duly recd. I hope your health was restored as soon as was promised by the decrease of your fever, and that it continues to be good. I inclose a Circular required by the resignation of Mr. Key, to which I have nothing to add on that subject. Our Colleagues protest against a "Called Board" on any acct. tho’ I fear the Creditors of the University will be...
It is proper that I should lose no time in apprizing the Visitors of the University that the resignation of Mr Key has been tendered, as authorized, and accepted as required, by the resolution of the Board on that subject. He is very desirous at the same time, that it may not take effect till the middle of August, which will give him the opportunity of being present at the examination of the...
I recd by the last mail a letter from J. H. Causten, accompanied by a huge volume of Documents, and a stout pamphlet of arguments, with a printed letter to him from Mr. Pickering, on the mercantile claims agst. France and the release of her from them by the U.S. All these articles have been doubtless sent to you also, as I am requested by Mr. C. to forward the inclosed Certificate of Agency,...
Inferring from the silence of the Newspapers, since they announced your appointment as a visitor of the University, that your answer did not require a replacing one, I take for granted that you will be with your colleagues at the legal place & period. Allow me to count on your being thus far on your way in time for us to proceed hence together. I propose to set out on saturday after next, and...