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As I can make no Apology for so long forgetting to return the volumes inclosed, I must, without qualification beg your pardon. This Work, tho’ it bears the name of Condorcet alone was understood to be written in concert between him and his great Patron, the Duke de la Rochefaucoult, as well as the “New Heaven,” and several other publications in favour of a Government in one center genuine...
Accept my thanks for your favour of last month. The safe Arrival of your books has quieted my conscience. There is nothing within the narrow Compass of human knowledge more interesting, than the Subject of your Letter. If “the Idea of a Government in one Center Seems to be every where exploded” perhaps Something remains undefined, as dangerous, as plausible and pernicious as that Idea. Half a...
Permit me to present you, what I think a Curiosity. Dr Mayhews Thirtieth of January Sermon, preached and printed almost Seventy Years ago. It made a great Sensation in New England: and not a little Noise in old England where Several Editions of it were reprinted and one especially which was inserted in a Collection of Tracts in four Volumes under the Title of “The Pillars of Priestcraft and...
We come, Sir, on behalf of the Citizens of Washington, to mingle our congratulations with our regrets at your political retirement; congratulations that spring from our participation as Americans in the untarnished glory that accompanies you—regrets that flow from feelings alive to the loss we are so soon to experience. At this event, as Citizens of a great community, we feel a pride only...
The magnificent spectacle which a voluntary retirement from the most exalted station, furnishes, is this day exemplified in you. Elevated by the suffrages of a free people to the highest office in their gift, the termination of the constitutional term found you in possession of their unabated confidence, which they expressed by a repetition of their will that you should continue to preside...
Give me leave to Congratulate you on the success of your Administration, and to accept of my best wishes for your present & futer Happiness, being well persuaded you retire from the cares of State with the full approbation of your own consience. Presumeing you may have some moments of lieusure, let me draw your attention to a class of men who have supported the measures of Goverment dureing 10...
I take the Liberty of enclosing you a prospectus of a Reading Room for the Metropolis of the Union upon an improved plan, and respectfully to solicit your patronage for the Institution. From the countenace at present shewn to the undertaking, the establishment promises soon to be in a prosperous condition. In retirement from public life—I pray you may enjoy health, with the pleasing...
Besey calling on me for some seed allows me just time to write a line, to await your arrival at home, requesting your attendance as a visitor of our proposed college on Tuesday the 8th. of April, being the day after our election. You will of course, I am in hopes come here the day or evening before, that we may have some previous consultation on the subject. I shall also request Genl. Cocke &...
It is with the hope, that I may be permitted without the imputation of vanity, to convey in this manner to Mr. & Mrs. Madison, upon their retireing to the pleasing scenes of private life, my most sincere wishes, that they may both long enjoy every felicity, which this world can possibly afford; and to beg they will have the goodness to be assured, that although, I have not on particular...
I have to acknowledge the receipt of your favour with its inclosure and shall attend to your commands as soon as the work is published. The deviation from the rule you have adopted in regard to publications as you explained to me in your letter impresses me with a high sense of the honor conferred on my work. I entertain well grounded hopes that the American discovery of a new principle of...
Mr. Birkbeck, a very extensive, and one of the most scientific and best practical agriculturalists of England, not liking the present state of things here, and having a very exalted opinion of our Country, and being also a great admirer of its political institutions, has determined to remove to and settle in it with his Family. Knowing your partiality for agriculture, I take the liberty of...
Actuated by the influence of respect for your private Character as a Citizen retiring from public duty to enjoy the Sweet reflection of a life spent in the Service of Your Country; though a Stranger I hope you will pardon my presumption in thus intruding this Epistle on Your attention— Have you a Son !! the prop of your declining years! the hope of your illustrious house!! Such a one once was...
Permit me to trouble you with the perusal of the enclos’d copy of a letter, I have this day written to the Secretary of the Navy to remove, in case you have decided on my Claim, any unfavorable impressions on your mind, which a knowledge of the circumstances alluded to, in the enclos’d communication may have made. As an Officer of the American Navy I most assuredly have felt the highest...
While gratitude fills and warms, the breast of a great and grateful people, whose feelings of regret at your departure from office, their late, great, reverd president, are consonant to the sublime thought of the eloquent Moore. “As the sunflower turns to her God when she sets, “The same form that she turn’d when she rose. Free’d from those arduous cares, could you feel leisure to attend to...
Mr Capellano has decided to make you a visit at Montpellier in the course of the summer. He says he does not like to be hurried in a Work of this nature. In making you a visit he might extend his journey to Mr Jeffersons of whom we have no good bust. He will conform to your convenience, I presume before or after harvest will be most agreeable to you. I have the honor to be with great respect...
For value received, I promise to pay to James Madison Esqr. or order Seven thousand, five hundred Dollars with Interest on demand. Richard Cutts Received of James Madison Esqr Flour [ sic ] thousand Dollars to be accounted for RC ( NjP : Crane Collection); Tr ( DLC ); Tr ( DLC : Dolley Payne Madison Papers). RC in Richard Cutts’s hand. On the verso of the RC
Your letter of Feb. 15. having given me the hope you would attend the meeting of the Visitors of the Central college near Charlottesville I lodged one for you at Montpelier notifying that our meeting would be on the day after our April court. A detention at Washington I presume prevented your attendance, and mr. Watson being sick, only Genl. Cocke, mr. Cabell and myself met. Altho’ not a...
I sincerely congratulate you on your release from incessant labors, corroding anxieties, active enemies & interested friends, & on your return to your books & farm, to tranquility & independance. A day of these is worth ages of the former, but all this you know. Yours of the 10th. was delivered to me yesterday. Mine of the 13th. had been sent off the moment it was written. We are made happy by...
The Speech of Mr. Monroe reached town yesterday, and is in the Chronicle of this morning. I suppose it is an Error of the Press that states the Commencement of the Revolution almost 40 years ago, and that it should be almost two & forty, contemplating the 19th Inst. —it is more than 40 since the declaration of Independence. But the felicitation that follows in this Paragraph is so much at...
The Lupinella seed has just arrived in a packet from Baltimore. I have the honor to enclose you a parcel of it. In Italy it is sown, or planted in March, and October, in high dry land, and in three years enriches the poorest soil so that it will bring two successive crops of wheat abundantly. The description which I have recd. of it, is not very perfect, but it contains all the information...
I beg leave to send you, enclosed, a few English newspapers. I have not been able to look over them myself, but perhaps you may be able to glean an hours amusement from them. They are the latest we have in the office. I shall have great pleasure in sending you others that arrive. Our last letters from Mr Adams are to the 29th of January. He takes no notice of the report of 19 ships of war...
As I can make no Apology for so long forgetting to return the Volumes inclosed, I must, without qualification beg your Pardon. This Work, tho’ it bears the name of Condorcet alone was understood to be written in concert between him and his great Patron the Duke de La Rochefaucoult, as well as [“]The New Heaven,” and several other publications in favour of a Government in one Center genuine...
I was highly gratified by the perusal of your message at the opening of Congress; but indeed one well might say how could it be other-wise, when even the Editors of the Times and of the Courier , with an host of others equally hostile to you, acknowleged its merits. I now see you have returned to Montpelier, where I wish you the enjoyment of every comfort: and where I have already commenced...
The acting Secretary of War has advised me of your ability to supply the United States with a quantity of Stocks for Muskets, and also of his having intimated that the price would not exceed thirty Cents each. By a reference to the Contracts hitherto executed and the proposals recently received from Baltimore, it appears that the uniform and fixed price is twenty five Cents for each approved...
I hope you have enjoyed good health since your safe return home, and that Mrs. Madison has been equally fortunate. You have, I doubt not, found sufficient occupation in domestic concerns, to interest you. Notices from this quarter, will for a while, judging from my own experience, rather interrupt a cherished tranquility, than give pleasure. I should now write you a long letter, if I did not...
I have delayed to answer your last obliging letter till I could inform you that the Cask of Port Wine was sent up to Mr. Stone. Owing to the severity of the Winter it did not get round from Alexandria, viâ Norfolk, to Richmond, till some time in March. After it’s arrival here it was proper to let it remain, for several weeks, in the Cellar, to settle, before I could venture to draw it off,...
Letter not found. 3 May 1817. Calendared as a three-page letter in the lists probably made by Peter Force (DLC: Madison Miscellany).
I wrote you on ⟨the 17th.⟩ Ult. that Mr: Adams had recd his appointment of Secretary of State, and given notice of his acceptance of it by the Schooner Woodburn for Baltimore. I gave the same information to Doctor Eustis by the following Post; adding that if any movement of his own in consequence of that of Mr: Adams, or otherwise, should occasion a demand for my services pro tempore, I should...
I enclose you the letter to Mrs Madison, which I omitted to take with me on my late visit, as I intimated to you, while at your house. Mr Correa came here, the day after I set out on my late trip. This visit was to counteract the anticipated mov’ments of the Pernambuco, ambassador, whose arrival, he was taught to expect from accounts receivd thence. No such person has yet arrivd. Mr. C. has...
Now that you have quitted the Helm of your Country & retired to private Life, on which Occasion I most sincerely congratulate you & Mrs. Madison, you may be able to recollect the kind promise made some time since to procure me some wild Turkies. Should you succeed, I dare hope Mr. Todd will find some Friend at Baltimore, who will take charge of them, & in the event of their being consigned to...
This letter will be handed you by my son John H. Pleasants. Going into your neighbourhood for a few days, and feeling the highest veneration for your character, he feels the strongest inclination to enjoy the pleasure of seeing you. With a view of indulging that inclination I have taken the liberty of troubling you in this mode of introducing him. Be pleased to present me most respectfully to...
In reviewing and examining my father’s papers, with the design of giving ornament and interest to his biography, I have derived incalculable pleasure from the perusal of letters written by you. They are very numerous; and (with some exceptions of a closely confidential character) treat of topics so important, in a manner so delightful, and so authentic, that I cannot estimate the value, their...
Notwithstanding, my not having the honor of a personal acquaintance, yet, I trust, that, the well known, suavity of your disposition will induce you to pardon my freedom in addressing you at present. Knowing, that for many years past, your highly useful life, has been Devoted to the promotion of the best interests of your beloved Country: I [s]hou’d not have intruded upon your retireme[n]t,...
Your favor of the 7th. Current has been duly received. The Contract as now proposed by Mr. Eddins for 12000 Stocks is perfectly satisfactory, although a preference would have been given to the number first proposed. I therefore beg leave to enclose to you the agreement executed by me, which you will please to deliver to Mr. Eddins on his furnishing you a Corresponding one, executed by himself,...
“The American Society for the Encouragement of Domestic Manufactures,” instituted in this city, sensible of the zeal, you have uniformly displayed, in the promotion of every object, connected with the Welfare and Independence of our country, had the honor to elect you a member, at their last meeting convened on the 13th. Inst., for the purpose of initiating into the Society, James Monroe,...
I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of May last with its enclosure an Extract Signed Valentine Gill. At the next meeting of the Board of Public Works, I will submit it, that I may receive their instructions, whether or not an inquiry shall be made after that gentleman. The acquirements and qualifications, which Mr Gill states himself to be possessed of being “A...
Accept my thanks for your favour of last month. The safe Arrival of your books has quieted my conscience. There is nothing within the narrow Compass of human knowledge more interesting, than the Subject of your Letter. If “the Idea of a Government in one Center Seems to be every where exploded” perhaps Something remains, undefined, as dangerous, as plausible and pernicious as that Idea. Half a...
I have already sent you original and duplicate of the enclosed; and I am sorry to say that my Correspondence with Dr. Eustis leaves the question of the appointment to the Consul Generalship of Holland under considerable doubt, which is by no means removed by a Letter he has written Mr: Adams—“Had Mr: Joy been at Rotterdam” he says “he would have had strong Claims; but under the necessity of...
When it became my lot to superintend for a short time, the business of the department of state, I little imagined, that among the foreign ministers, the Abbe Correa was the one with whom my official relations were to be the least smooth. Having imbibed a veneration for his character and genius, struck with the engaging simplicity of his manners and liberality of his principles, I had, on the...
The Bearer of this, Mr: Thomas Freeborn, is desirous of visiting Mr: Jefferson & yourself, and has requested me to favor him with a line. He would have brought Letters from respectable Gentlemen of New York, where he is a very respected Character, as I have ample testimony of, but he did not think of going further South than this. He has no particular Business, but to see those great men of...
We have latterly had no papers from abroad. Mr Adams seems to have ceased sending them, probably from his preparations to come home. His last letter to the department stated his expectation to embark before the first of June. As to the French papers they come to us but seldom, and amount to but little when they do come. With Russia, France and Spain, our relations continue, I believe, just as...
In two packages, distinct from this letter, I return you your father’s meteorological diaries, which you were so kind as to lend me, and a piece on paper money recieved from you some time ago. From the former I have made out tables of rain and snow, and a calendar of animal and vegetable matters announcing the advance of seasons. Having now compleated 7. years of observations since my return...
It being nearly impossible for me to do my self the honour of presenting the inclosed letter, I take the liberty to forward it to you, desiring to be permitted to expose the reasons and motives of my proceeding. Circumstances having obliged me to delay my departure from France, after my last interview with the marquis de la Fayette I could not reach this place before november last year. I...
After you left this, a difficulty occured in obtaining the title to the lands purchased for the Central College, that difficulty was not removed untill yesterday, when a title was obtained; the prospect of raising a considerable sum by individual donations to the College is now truly flattering. I am advised to (and now with great diffidence & due deference) inclose you a copy of the...
England ought to have been the Garden of the World, as it respects the management of Agriculture, and she certainly has done much in this way, but very very far short indeed, of what might have been done, too much consequence has been placed upon some other Systems, where more rapid Fortunes could be made, but as I have uniformly declared to my Private Friends that Riches so accumulated would...
The enclosed was received in due course, no proper opportunity presented until a few days since, on presenting the letter, the Gentleman observed, that Mr Gill had left Halifax, and he believed for the United States, but for what State he did not know. I have thought best to return the letter to you, if I should learn where Mr Gill is, I shall advise you. Very respectfully, I am, Sir, your...
I am aware that to write on public business to a Gentn who retired from it, if on any common or ordinary occurrence would be improper. I wd. not—& am sorry the nature of the Comn. renders appology unnecessary because as you have held the first rank & enjoyed the confidence and Esteem of all good Citizens honor gratitude & Duty impose on you the sacred obligation of a public Guardian of their...
Inclosed I send you a letter from Mrs. Lee to Mrs. Madison, to whom be pleased to present my best respects & wishes, which was intended to have been conveyed by Mr. Todd. It affords me very great satisfaction to hear from every quarter, that you enjoy in your delightful retirement fine health with philosophic Ease. That you may long continue in possession of these blessings, enhanced as they...
I was honored by your letter of March last on the 11th. of that month. The papers inclosed came safely to hand. The subject of the cotton culture, commerce and manufacture can never cease to be of primary interest to any man who understands and feels a concern in the means of promoting the wealth of the United States. The present embarrassments of the maritime commerce of the world, in which...
I have been honor’d by the receipt of your Excellencys letter & inclosures of the 30th Ulto. I hasten to assure you, that whatever is in my power to serve the General Fayett or his friends, will be afforded with the greatest pleasure. If Mr. Deperron is desirous of embarking onbd. the Franklin as a passenger, he is most heartily welcom, and to everything my Cabin & personal attention, will...