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I am, indeed, gratified by the receipt of your letter of the 27th ulto. The approbation of those we ourselves reverence for their virtues, is, perhaps, the sweetest reward for our efforts to be useful. Only eleven volumes of the Weekly Register are yet finished. These may be forwarded, if you please, immediately to Boston, & can be easily sent to you, through Mr. Dawes; or by my agent there,...
I have the satisfaction to inform you that John Quincy Adams Esq. was this morning nominated Secretary of State, and forthwith agreed to, in Senate, with only one dissenting vote—Mr Crawford continues in the Treasury and Gov Shelby is appointed Secy of War;—Mrs: Otis unites with me in respects to Mrs. Adams and yourself, and hope you have experienced no material inconvenience from the rigour...
To my very great surprise and mortification, I saw in the daily Advertizer a week or ten days since, letters written by you in early life to my Father, and how they ever got abroad or published is wholly a mystery to me, and to our Family; I recollect to have seen them some twelve or fifteen years since, & then they were in a trunk of my father’s, with other private papers, that trunk was in...
I set out the first of next week on the journey to the South in execution of a State commission to examine the various penitentiaries. I have a desire to visit Washington if time will permit, and will certainly attempt to get there if my brother in law Captain Stewart will accompany me from Philadelphia as he has proposed—I knew Mr Monroe in England, and I may perhaps say he honored me with a...
I am, indeed, gratified by the receipt of your letter of the 27th ulto. The approbation of those we ourselves reverence for their virtues, is, perhaps, the sweetest reward for our efforts to be useful. Only eleven volumes of the Weekly Register are yet finished. These may be forwarded, if you please, immediately to Boston, & can be easily sent to you, through Mr. Dawes, or by my agent there,...
I have received, within a few days, your portrait, painted by Mr. Morse for me.— I have already informed you that I received an anonymous letter from a lady without date or place of residence, but bearing the Boston postmark, requesting me in urgent terms not to use the portrait for an engraving. Before the portrait arrived, I heard, through various channels, from persons of Boston, that the...
I have taken the liberty to send you by mail two books—Kentucky Productions, for your perusal and thro you to be presented to the “ Boston Atheneum ”— “The philosophy of the human mind,” is thought by some to possessess merit— “The History of the late war in the North West” contains a correct detail of facts & may give some idea of the true Indian character & manners—The distinction which it...
I do rejoice that “I have brought out the old gentleman”, & the Public would rejoice with me were they in Possession of all my Letters from Quincy since the 4th. of November last, especially of the two last. There are in the Details of this confidential Correspondence such Traits & Detections of Character, as could not have found their Way into the public Papers of the Day they refer to, &...
I Most affectionately partake in the Gratification You are going to derive from the Arrival of Mr and Mrs Quincy Adams with your grand children to the Satisfaction of a father you will join that of a patriot, the Appointment of Your Son to the place of Secretary of State being a great public Advantage. I Refer Myself to Him for European News, in this Extensive Question in Betwen Rights and...
Absences and avocations had prevented my acknoleging your favor of Feb. 2. when that of Apr. 19. arrived. I had not the pleasure of recieving the former by the hands of mr Lyman. his business probably carried him in another direction; for I am far inland, & distant from the great line of communication between the trading cities. your recommendations are always welcome, for indeed the subjects...
I was going to trouble you with a letter on the subject of a continuation of the remarks on the Jesuits, which it would I presume be desireable for the Editor to receive by the first of next month, as the number for July will then go to press, when my Father gave me your letter of the 15th inst. to read. The pamphlet you mention of Hutchinson’s I have never seen. I am going to prepare an...
I gratefully return to you the little pamphlet, & send with it a copy of the Register in which I have published it. I used the license you gave me, as to your letter in full, as well for an introduction to the sketch itself, as because I thought it might be of advantage to me. Many have been much gratified in reading that sketch—& I, indeed, rejoice at having had the pleasure to disseminate...
I have recd. your favor of the 22d Ult: with the two vols. bearing the name of Condorcet. If the length of time they remained in your hands, had been in the least inconvenient to me, which was not the case, the debt would have been greatly overpaid, by the interesting observations into which you were led by the return of them. The idea of a Government “in one center” as explained and espoused...
Your finale on Mr. Hutchinson’s Character was duly received. If I rightly remember, the Governor soon after dissolving the Provincial Assembly, retired or rather fled to England to shelter himself from the approaching Storm, & secure his hard earned Reward. The few Years of the revolutionary War which he lived must have embittered his declining Days marked by Neglect, & Disappointment....
It is with warm feelings that I acknowledge the favor you have conferred upon me by your letter of the 25th ult. accompanied by the very interesting pamphlet you forwarded. After carefully using it for the purposes proposed, I will faithfully return it. I do not wish to be thought to as saying what I do not believe, which is not my point, when I assure you of my belief that this pamphlet may...
Since the 7th of Febr—I did not receive a line from my frend—but having been honoured with two Letters of your Ladÿ, without a hint, that your health was not So good, and having read in the N. papers—that you were present at a festival at Boston, I presume, that other more Serious occupations kept you employ’d—or that Letter writing became rather to you a penible task, whenever you could not...
“The American Society for the Encouragement of Domestic Manufactures”, instituted in this city, sensible of the zeal you have uniformly displayed in the promotion of every object; connected with the Welfare and Independence of our Country, had the honor, to elect you a member, at their last meeting, convened on the 13th: Inst. for the purpose of initiating into the Society James Monroe,...
I am at present obliged to write to you by another hand. The inclosed letter was sent to me in May last by your Son Thomas B. Adams Esquire, with a request that I should return it under cover to you. I regret that owing to a mistake of his residence, I had not the pleasure of his company at my table when he was last in this City. Miss Rutter has been so kind, I understand, as to explain the...
Thou wast good enough to inform me that ‘no Book of mine would disturb thy peace,’ & I accordingly ordered my publisher to send thee a small volume, some time last winter. It is a little thing—but still as it is my youngest child, in this way, I feel some degree of anxiety about its fate. I speak of ‘The Mother-in-Law,’ published at Boston. I congratulate thee, & the country, on the return of...
I regret that I could not have the pleasure of seing you again before you left town, which I found that you had done, when I calld yesterday at your lodgings. I wanted to communicate more fully with you, respecting the part I ought to take, in the ceremonies of this day. It is possible you may be in town to day in which I case I may still enjoy that advantage. my particular object in sending...
as A tribute of respect and Esteem for the Eminent virtues of one of the principal Fathers of my Nations Admirable institutions and a promoter of her Independence I take the Liberty of presenting you a copy of the Narrative of my late Disasters and Sufferings in Africa &c cherishing a hope that its perusal will not prove irksome. I have the Honour to be with the greatest / regard and profound...
I gratefully return the papers you did me the honor to send into me, with a copy of them inserted in the Register. I hardly knew how far I was authorized to give your private letter to the public; but the parts inserted seemed necessary as an introduction to the papers; & I hope I have not transcended your will in that respect. I will thank you for the papers about Miranda’s affair. It is not...
A Society has been established at this place for the promotion of agricultural and rural affairs—It consist of the most respectable and intelligent citizens of our county, who convinced of the imperfect state of agriculture among us, are stimulated by the most laudable motives to effect some improvements in it, and not only by examples on their farms, but by every other means which lay in...
I have the pleasure to return to you the letters of Gov McKean, with a copy of them inserted in the Register. My early & good friend Cæsar A Rodney, of Delaware, nephew of C.R. of the “76 congress, informs me that he has some of deceased patriots’ letters dated in 1777—1799; & says he will furnish them. When they are published, I shall send a copy to you. I am gratified to observe that the...
Presuming that, as age advances, it must become irksome to maintain your extensive correspondence, I have long delayed addressing a line to you, hesitating, though I knew the subject would interest. The high respect I entertain for yourself and your son, the honble John Q. Adams, will not permit me longer to hesitate, since the communication, given in a Kentucky Paper, respecting our...
After revolving upon some suitable apology for intruding myself with the following statement and request, I have thought it most respectful to decline offering any, expect to observe that if ought appears to your better judgement improper in either, that you will attribute it to any thing else than a willingness on my part to act so, in any respect towards you. For six years ending with the...
With great pleasure, I, yesterday, received your favour of the 1st Inst. acknowledging the receipt of my letter of July 21st.—I conceive it important always thus early to advise a correspondent of the receipt of important letters, which I offer as my apology for this line. Were it not for the trouble in writing at your time of life, I should be tempted to draw largely upon your benevolence, in...
A month’s absence from Monticello has added to the delay of acknoleging your last letters; and indeed for a month before I left it our projected College gave me constant employment; for being the only Visitor in it’s immediate neighborhood, all it’s administrative business falls on me, and that, where building is going on, is not a little. in yours of July 15, you express a wish to see our...
On the rect. of a Letter signed by you and several others, respecting a Boat belonging to a Mr. Davis of Quincey; I immediately ordered an investigation of the transaction; And now forward to you the enclosed Letters, showing the result of the Inquiry—The injury that the Boat sustained appears to been purely accidental. I regret that Mr. Davis did not represent the Circumstance to the...
Having in so long a time not received a word from Quincÿ, although I was freed from all anxiety about your wellfare mrs Guild and her amiable sister Catherine, both having informed me, that you continued to enjoy not only a hum cum dignitate, which would be nothing new—but all possible happiness that can fall to the share of human mind, while your excellent Lady’s gratification must have...
I regret that I had not the pleasure of seeing your son, when he passed through this city. I did not hear of his being here, till the Steam Boat had left the wharf. I now address a line to you, asking your opinion on certain points, on which I want information and your advice.—Our Gen. Assembly meet at N. Haven, on the ninth of October—and I shall leave this on the eighth, being chosen a...
I would inform you my daughter Mrs: Lincoln died yesterday after a lingering illness. The funeral will be tomorrow.—The bell will toll at 3—O—clock.— If convenient it would be highly gratifying to us for yours, Judge Adams’s & Mr. John Greenleafs families to attend.— With sentiments of the highest respect / & esteem your most obedient servant.— MHi : Adams Papers.
I received on Saturday last, through the medium of the Post-Office, a letter from you dated the 9th. inst. in which you request me to procure you a piece of white marble 24 inches in length, by 20 inches in breadth, with an inscription engraved on it. Your request shall be immediately attended to, and the slab ready for delivery within eight or ten days from the date of this letter. You have...
I take the liberty of Congratulating you on the returne of your worthy Son to America, after years of absence in Europe, And may He satisfactorily discharge the duties of his present appointment.—I was pleased and much gratified with a short interview with President Munro, on his late tour into the District of Maine: And have considerable expectations that the difference in Sentiment, on the...
It is now 37 years since I had the pleasure to recieve your first letter at Anconis It was a paternal letter containing advice to a Young Man, which was peculiarly usefull to me. You than said—“ I must talk to you like an old man ”—I am now 15 years older than you was than. In several of your Subsequent letters you express’d a wish to know precisely, the conversation which pass’d between Judge...
I take leave to present to you a Map, (of the military bounty Lands in the Illinois Territory) engraved for the use of the Soldiers of the late Army. By means of these Maps every Soldier can, for one dollar, obtain accurate information relative to the soil, Timber, & position of the Tract which falls to his lot, & thereby appreciate the value of his Country’s bounty. I have the honor / to be...
I had the Honour duly to receive your highly esteemed favour re commendatory of my Narrative, under date of 23d July last.—It would have given me great pleasure, to become personally acquainted with a Gentleman, who has been so preeminently favoured by Heaven, with extraordinary intellect, Virtue, talents, & strength of mind, whose life has been devoted to his countrys best interests, in...
Your esteemed favor of the 29 of April was duly received. In that you mention having received five numbers of the Alleghany Magazine. I have taken the liberty, which I hope you will excuse, to transmit all the numbers published, except the two last, which accompany this line. Please to accept them as a token of that respect, which I have been taught from early life to cherish for one, of whose...
As I returned home in safety in the course of this week, the first moments of leisure, after having informed my children and mr Busti of this happy event, shall be devoted, to acknowledge the favour of your’s of the first of Oct. In my former from Philadelphia I mentioned—how I was bruised—wounded—healed—and restored to perfect health—now I can only mention, and this, I am assured is a far...
Sensible of the honour I received by your permitting me to prefix your name to the second and third editions of this work, I am desirous that the present should appear under the same respectable and distinguished patronage. The talents and virtues which you have exhibited, both in public and private life, will, I trust, be duly appreciated by the rising generation; and it is my ardent wish,...
I take the liberty of sending to you the only copy entire , which I possess of the Discourse I delivered before the Humane Society last Spring. I have promised it to Mr Shaw ultimately, and when you have read it, if you will take that trouble I will thank you to give it to him I do not ask you to read the Discourse itself which is a trifling performance on the trite subject of Charity, but the...
I have obtained from Wm. Temple Franklin, Esqr. a selection of the manuscript writings of the late Dr. B. Franklin, which I am now arranging & intend ere long to publish.—It is my intintion in this work to present to the publick a political view of the times from 1770 to 1790. & to transmit to posterity the united fame , of those celebrated worthies to whom we are indebted for the glorious...
Who can better explain the character of a patriot of our Revolution, than his copatriots in the field or in the council? With the approbation of Judge McKean I am collecting materials for a life of his late father. Will you, Sir, many of whose nights were consumed, with Thomas McKean, in watchings for your Country’s sake, communicate to me any anecdotes of him, which are reposited in your...
I received your letter with pleasure, and read it with high satisfaction. You have paid the highest compliment on the President’s Message or rather, Elogium, that I have yet seen, or have ever heard of—Our proud federalists however are displeased & mortified that he did not tell the whole world, how grand, how rich, how powerful, how gifted & how virtuous they in Boston are above all other...
I am much obliged to You for the Very Agreable Acquaintance of Mr Theodore Lyman; to Him I Will Be Under obligation for the kind Care He takes to forward this Letter: He lives in the Capital: I in the Country Where the pleasure and occupation of farming are to Me a Continual source of Enjoyment. Not So Exclusive However as to Render me insensible of What is Going on in the political line. our...
Accept my most cordial thanks for your truly friendly epistle. I loose not a moment in answering your interesting query. The Lady in question is, I conceive legally divorced. Her quondam husband is now in the jail of New York, for the third or fourth time; a mere vagabone. They were divorced in 1810, by the Supreme Court of Vermont. The Lady & her father, with the aid of Judge Dawes were...
You will forgive my long delay in replying to your very interesting & confidential favor of the 18th. March:—I was reluctant to write until I could inform you that I had made some progress in the work so honorably confided to me by the Nation. You justly observe that the intended size of the paintings appears to you vast:—They will considerably exceed the dimensions of the descent from the...
Habituated as I have long been to consider your judgement as infallible, I have not found it exactly so on the subject of our two last letters. When I wrote to you on that subject of the heart, I had come to a fixed resolution of following the advice of my family & friends. I have penetrated their thoughts, & have discovered their opinion which taken collectively amounts to this— we censure...
When I had the honour of calling on you, I only conjectured that the printing of the Journals of the Convention, &c would be under the direction of the Secretary of State; but by the inclosed N. Intelligencer it appears to be very certain that the publication will be committed to his care.— You will recollect that in the letter wh. I shewed you from Mr: King, it was suggested that, were I on...
I am just honored with your letter of the 5th. inst. and am truly gratified to learn that my sketches of Mr. Henry have afforded you entertainment. If I could have anticipated such an effect, I would have taken the liberty, on the first publication of the book, to have ordered you a copy, as a slight proof of that sincere respect, which, in common with my countrymen, I feel towards you as one...