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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Adams, John" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency"
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I yesterday received your Letter announcing the death of Judge Tudor but the melancholy news which I had received from St Petersburg only half an hour before broke the shock as that comparatively was a calamity so dreadful that the death of the Judge appeared nothing more than an event which must naturally be expected—It is no doubt a distressing event to the family and sudden deaths are...
Mr Shaw has suggested to me the propriety of omitting (in the proposed Vol. of Masstts. State papers) the long altercation between Govr. Hutchinson & the House of Rep. respecting the holding of the Genl. Court at Cambridge, or any where out of Boston—I had, before he spoke to me on the subject, thought it would not be necessary to publish that controversy any further, than one communication on...
I have heard, with some surprize, your proposition to Mr Adams that we should once more take up our residence with you. It is not unnatural that you should wish to have your Children with you, but with so numerous a family as ours it cannot be expected that we should at all times promote your enjoyment, and there may be many times when the necessary wants and recreations of Children would be a...
I have in contemplation, in concert with Isaac Walker a qr. blood Indian of the Wyandot tribe, to publish a history of the traditions of that once powerful nation. provided a work of this kind would meet the approbation of our most distinguished fellow citizens.— The work will contain the traditional history of that nation from as early a date as near 200 year previous to the discovery of...
John W. Boott Esq. of this city being desirous, with his friend Mr M Cale, of Philadelphia, to pay his respects to you and has requested me to give him that opportunity. He is one of our most respectable citizens and I shall be happy to enable him to enjoy the gratification of the interview he wishes Very respectfully / Yrs MHi : Adams Papers.
I have received you kind Letter of the 3d: instant, full of good counsel, of which I hope at the proper time to make a suitable improvement. It is a great satisfaction to me, that my Son George has mentioned your approbation, and made himself in any manner useful to you during the vacation at the University. My affection for him induces me to hope that his time has been spent most...
Considering you a patron of literature & science, & a well wisher to the general interest of education, the editors of the Academician, by this day’s mail, forward you the 1, 2 & 3 Nos. for perusal. Should you approve of the work, your signature as a subscriber & influence to make the work known would aid us very much in effecting the Object we have in view. With the greatest respect, / We...
I am a great defaulter, my dear Sir, in our correspondence, but prostrate health rarely permits me to write; and, when it does, matters of business imperiously press their claims. I am getting better however, slowly, swelled legs being now the only serious symptom, and these, I believe, proceed from extreme debility. I can walk but little; but I ride 6. or 8. miles a day without fatigue; &...
Please to accept the inclosed Copy of a Circular letter, you will by it perceive that I am not with willing to have the Commerce of the united States subverted—. I am with great respect Your obt Sert MHi : Adams Papers.
I intended, before this, to have done myself the honor of visiting you, personally to make my acknowledgments for the letter which you were so obliging as to furnish me to the President of the United States: but having been so much occupied since I received it, that I have not been able to do myself that pleasure. Permit me now, dear Sir, to return you my most grateful thanks for the kind and...
Your letter of Sept. last came duly to hand; but I have neglected to answer it till this late period, being loath to put you to the trouble—of writing, me again, in your feeble and advanced period of life. However, as you have given me a partial history of your Physical habits, I take the liberty to request of you a little further, account, if you feel able for I consider such habits as yours,...
By a resolve of the 76 Association, made in consequence of their high regard for your republican Principles, and gratitude for the Service, you have rendered the nation, I Send you a Copy of Mr: Elliotts Oration, delivered before that Society on the last 4th of July. I also Send you a copy of Mr: Ramsay’s, delivered the year previous. I am aware that you Should have received the latter long...
Having it in contemplation to prepare the Biography of Roger Sherman Esqr., one of the Signers of the Declaration of Independence, and having been informed by his relatives that you were intimately acquainted with his private & political character, I beg leave very respectfully to request, that you will give the weight of your authority to the opinion which has already been formed, in relation...
I am honoured with your letter of the 5th. inst. If you have felt pleasure in recognizing in me the friend & pupil of a Man whom you knew & esteemed; you may judge of my Satisfaction, in discovering that his modest mind had not escaped your just discernment. He was all that you describe; to all Mankind he was an enlightened instructor; to me he was almost a father, for he loved me with filial...
18 Feb Passed the day quietly at home excepting returning a few morning visits 19 Mr A. dined at Mr Lowndes’s and I called for Mr & Mrs: Smith and Mr: A. to accompany me to the French Ministers. Mr S declined going—We found a small company assembled and the party was tolerably agreeable—I was engaged at a Ball at Mrs: Gales’s and intended to go from Mrs: de Neuvilles quite early but Mr A....
Your favour of Jany 29th. directed to me in Boston, was forwarded, and received a short time after. It is always a high gratification to be honoured with a line from one, whose character and public services are held in grateful recollection. I take the liberty of enclosing the papers of 24th and 31st inst. presuming you will be, at least amused by a curious exhibition, which may be called...
a Bostonian who reveres the “Sage of Quincy” takes the liberty of transmitting him this newspaper from Ohio—as possibly it may not reach his retreat He cannot avoid expressing his gratification, that after all the shallow abuse which has been recently poured forth upon the present administration, there is a good feeling in the Western country, correspondent to that which is felt by the high...
If your Letter of 20. May were the only one from you upon my files yet unanswered, every look at its date would give me a pang of self-reproach—How then shall I acknowledge at the same time the receipt of those of 31. Decbr. and of 2. 8. 13. 29. January, and apologize for not having replied to them sooner—During the Session of Congress, your indulgence would readily account for my...
I have the honor to transmit to you the enclosed communication from a Committee of the Corporation of this City— I am Sir / with very great respect / Your Hb. Sert. MHi : Adams Papers.
You will pardon (I hope) the freedom I take in introducing to your Notice the bearer of this, who has a strong desire (from respectable motives) to have the satisfaction of conversing a few moments with the man who took so large a share in the important and arduous business of our Revolution and to whose exertions (under God) we are in a great measure indebted for the blessings of...
“The American Society for the Encouragement of Domestic Manufactures”, instituted in this city, sensible of the zeal you have uniformly displayed in the promotion of every object; connected with the Welfare and Independence of our Country, had the honor, to elect you a member, at their last meeting, convened on the 13th: Inst. for the purpose of initiating into the Society James Monroe,...
I have never lost the Veneration, I imbibed for your Character in my Young Days—I rejoice that you yet live & enjoy so good Health—I have received a Pamphlet from Jedediah Morse DD—announcing the Establishment of a New Society for the civil iz ation of the Aborigines of this Country—your Name stands at the Head of the honourary members or Vice Presidents. I am requested to aid by money the...
The Hon’ble Daniel Corry, Judge Bridge, Ruel Williams Esqr. and Colonel Corry of Augusta in the District of Maine, have recently sent me two barrels of flour, made from wheat grown on the borders of the Kennebeck, and there manufactured,—believing, as they state, that I should be gratified with the accounts of the abundant wheat crops which that District will produce, and on which its...
The inclosed small volume and map, relate to a subject in which you took an early and distinguished part: viz. the planning and laying out of this infant Metropolis, and believing that you still feel a deep interest in its welfare, I have sent you this small tribute of my high respect, hoping that you may find some satisfactory information in it, as regards the progress and improvement of the...
I was honoured by your favour of the 2d Inst: in answer to my letter of 26th ult. I cannot refrain from expressing my very great pleasure, in perusing this renewed proof of the wonderful retention of mental powers at this advanced period of life. I should be happy, could I justly think that, though nearly thirty years younger than yourself, I now possessed the memory and powers of mental...
Having been advised to arrange an unbiassed history of the events which have grown out of the late Seminole War, especially as relating to the conduct of General Jackson we assume the liberty of requesting your generous aid in an undertaking which we esteem laudable and important— In calculating the difficulties which might impede our project we were persuaded that no plan could be pursued...
By some means or other it would seem that one of my Letters to you have been lost—perhaps you had better enquire at the Post Office—I answered you immediately after you wrote about the desk and recommended you to take the one offered by Louisa Smith—I send you the dates of my Letters that you may ascertain whether any of them are missing 11th. 22d 29th March 18th and 23d April 24th. & 25th of...
Three long and dangerous illnesses within the last 12. months must apologise for my long silence towards you. The paper bubble is then burst. this is what you & I, and every reasoning man, seduced by no obliquity of mind, or interest, have long foreseen. yet it’s disastrous effects are not the less for having been foreseen. we were laboring under a dropsical fulness of circulating medium....
It is a very long time my dear venerated father since I have written to you; but the events of yesterday were altogether so interesting I cannot refrain from giving you an account of them— The genl in his travels through this Country has been so much the publick idol, and the devotion of the people has been continued with so much fervour until the last moment of his residence among us, he...
I have addressed to you, by the Post office, the first no. of the “Biography &c. ” —of which I have now hazarded the publication; & which I beg the favour of you to accept, with my grateful acknowledgements, at the same time, for your kind attention to my former letter. This vol. has been hurried into the world but “half made up”, to meet the conveniences of printers & publishers. It has been...
That I may prove to you and my Dear Mrs Adams, the high estimation of the value I attach to the picture you have confided to my care—I sent immediately for a blacksmith, and had an Iron fender made to go round the lower part, as a protection from the careless brush, of the House maid, or the incautious foot of those who might otherwise wish to come too near it—The room is every day aird, and...
your truely affectionate Letter of the 27th ultimo met me at this place by last mail, and I use the return of the same, to make my acknowledgemts of gratitude, with reciprocations of Sentim e nt for the tender and flattering Interest you express for the recovery of my health, which has been very seriously deteriorated by the last inroad made upon it— I do assure you my Dear Friend, I feel most...
You cannot Immagine the comfort your Letter of 22d Ultimo gave me I fear’d Indisposition had so far disabled you to dictate a Letter, as to leave me expossed to the contradictory accounts I now, & then had by transient visitors, who had heard from others something concerning your health; young Mr Quincy exceptd who gave me a more direct account of you, and since then thro’ Mr T P Davis who...
Your letter of the 28th was handed to me yesterday. That, which you did me the honor to write to me at Lexington, went thither in the mail and returned before I received it. I should have answered it immediately, had I not intended every day to get an early opportunity to make you a visit at Quincy. My wishes on this subject have been controled by the series of preparations which I have been...
I delay’d to write you a few lines—to congratulate you cordially on the happy arrival of the 30th of Oct—and join your Relatives and frends in celebrating the anniversary of your 89 Birthday fostering the hope, that before this time I might have Seen a happy desired conclusion in our Legislature—with regard to the Presidential election—But the caucus-cabal thus far disappointed me in my ardent...
Hereto adjoined is a copy of a Circular, which we have addressed to each Member of both Houses of Congress. The work therein suggested, we consider important to the public; and further, feel little anxiety for the result.—We deem it respectful to trouble you with our views on the subject, as if the work be undertaken, we shall ask with confidence your advice and direction as to the authorities...
It is some time since, I Wrote you, and I some times think I am culpable in not doing it more frequently, But my Apology to my self is, that it operates as a Tax upon your politeness, for a reply,—Be this as it may, you may be assured that seldom a Day passes, but I think of you, and it will afford me real pleasure to hear from you.—This World is yet in a troubled State—and in much confusion...
The warm season has come again and delightful as it is to me, is no doubt also very acceptable to you, Sir. The prevailing rule I believe, is a moderate heat, and one which is perhaps better adapted to afford ease to you than extremes either way. My attachment to warm weather excludes any idea of a medium or rather of what is commonly called so. And it is for this reason that I prefer the...
In answer to your first query, how do you do? altho’ I may not with propriety reply “ Athletice, prancratise, Valeo , ” Yet thro the smiles of a kind providence, I am free from pain or anxiety of Body or Mind, respecting the things of this life or a future—I have food and raiment convenient, and in a quiet contented frame of Mind perhaps in as much, or more so: than at any former period of my...
As I feel very much concerned for your dissmission from College my Dear John lest you should have some debts that may embarrass you I beg you me immediately that I may find some plan if possible to extricate you from your most pressing difficulties without disguising in the least the real state of things—My means are very small but perhaps I may find some medium which may enable me to settle...
I should sooner have answered your Letter my Son had I not expected to hear that you had received Booth’s Journal the first Number of which was sent to you last Month its he is an object of great respect and attention to our little family here the neglect and coldness with which you appear to treat his literary production has been cause of offence to all and he has determined to retaliate by...
In obedience to a vote of the Standing Committee of the Washington Society I have the honor to transmit to you the enclosed Card, and to request that you will honor the Society with your presence on the ensuing Anniversary of American Independence. With respect, / your most obt Servt— MHi : Adams Papers.
I have written to my brother this day, informing him that I have consented that you and Charles should leave Cambridge, for your journey hither on the 23d. of this month, and requesting him to furnish each of you with 80 dollars, for the expenses of your Journey; an account of which expenses you will each of you keep to be exhibited to me. Take good care of yourselves on the road—We shall all...
Words are poor, and wholly inadequate to express the grateful feelings of my heart for your excellent letter, couched in terms of no equivocal import, but wiping with a single stroke every pretence of public odium, which envy and malignity had endeavoured to fix on the character of General Putnam. Such testimony, from such a sourse, tho’ of a negative kind, is all the occasion required to...
I am, indeed, gratified by the receipt of your letter of the 27th ulto. The approbation of those we ourselves reverence for their virtues, is, perhaps, the sweetest reward for our efforts to be useful. Only eleven volumes of the Weekly Register are yet finished. These may be forwarded, if you please, immediately to Boston, & can be easily sent to you, through Mr. Dawes, or by my agent there,...
I did myself the honor to address a note to you under date of the 16th. Inst requesting permission to use part of your Letter to Col. Putnam—Since which I have recd. a Letter from Col. Putnam covering one to you which I forward; saying he had “presumed to make use of part of your Letter without your permission” As Col. Putnam has made use of it—(which I most sincerely hope will meet your...
The enclosed letter to Genl. La Fayette, has been occasioned by the recurrence of our national anniversary, & contains a printed copy of the Address I delivered on that day. If there be nothing improper in the request, and I assure you, that I cannot perceive its impropriety; I pray you to favor me with the facilities at your disposal, to ensure its safe conveyance to him. I send you a copy...
I take great pleasure in introducing to your acquaintance, Mr. David Hoffman, a distinguished Member of the Bar at Baltimore, who makes with his Lady a Summer excursion to our Section of the Union and will deliver you this Letter. I am dear Sir ever faithfully your Son MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
Mrs Cruft and Myself have been very much gratifyed by your present of two Silver cans. & for which you will please accept our united thanks. and be assured Sir, this Valuable token will be held by us in lasting Remembrance of the donor.—We felt ourselves much honord & gratifyed by your Visit, and it will give us pleasure at all times if we can contribute to your happiness by making our house...
Out of the circle of your own family, there are none who can feel more sorrow at the heavy affliction that has fallen upon you than we do here. We heard the melancholy news two days ago. “What exalted and long-tried excellence, exclaimed my wife, has gone to the tomb.” “As soon as my confinement was over,” she continued, “I had intended that my first letter, after one to my own mother, should...