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While an undistinguishing thirst for popularity is reprehensible, the desire to be known and approved by those great and good characters, whom we have from infancy been taught to venerate, is perhaps somewhat better than innocent; since its tendency is to call into action, and turn to beneficial purposes, some of the best faculties of our nature. Tho the writer is not unconscious of this...
Altho’ I have not the honor of Knowing you personally, but as one of the few illustrious Patriots of the revolution Still living,—and one for whom I feel a great Veneration & attachment for great & distinguished Services rendered to our Common Country in her Utmost Need,—I take the liberty to ask you to furnish me with a Copy of a letter from the late General Washington to yourself,—giving his...
On my arrival at this place I address’d to you a letter And am now very concious that I made in it a very improper request which was a letter of introduction to Judge Marshall and am the more fully Confirm’d in this, by not receiving it One of my objects by the present letter is to bring to your view the cruel causes of my present unfortunate State, with respect to property; and shall make my...
I have some time wished, and from day to day intended to write you a letter: And your esteem’d favor of the 21st of last month encreas’d that desire. But whenever I have place’d paper before me for that purpose, my hand has been arrested by an afflicting thought, that by expressing my condolence for the trying loss you have met with, I might open in your bosom a healing wound. But a confidence...
I have taken the liberty to enclose in this letter to your Son, which fredom I request you will excuse. Altho circumstances have placed me at a greater distance from you, yet neither distance, circumstances, nor time, will ever diminish my sincere respect; and solicitude for your happiness; nor the grateful feelings which I have ever retained, for the long and important Services, which you...
Permit me to have the honor of tendering my services to the Electors of President and Vice President of the United States.—for the purpose of carrying on the Votes of thier board to the seat of Government. very respectfully / I have the honor to be / Your Most humble Servant MHi : Adams Papers.
I am just honored with your letter of the 5th. inst. and am truly gratified to learn that my sketches of Mr. Henry have afforded you entertainment. If I could have anticipated such an effect, I would have taken the liberty, on the first publication of the book, to have ordered you a copy, as a slight proof of that sincere respect, which, in common with my countrymen, I feel towards you as one...
The bearer Major Wolcott Huntington, is a very estimable young Gentleman, Son of General Ebenezer Huntington of this State, who served in the American Army from the year 1775 till the close of the revolutionary War. In common with the patriotic young men of the present age, he is desirous of personally manifesting the admiration and gratitude with which all men are animated, towards the Eldest...
In answer to your last my dear John I can only say that if the accomodations are so suitable and the price so reasonable as you say at the Exchange I should most certainly prefer them to any others but you know that your father is particular on this point and I wish you to ascertain exactly before I come so that we may decide immediately after our arrival—There will be your father myself Ellen...
The respects of the undersigned await on President Adams. He has to acknowledge the reception of his kind letter of November 17th: 1824. The steady hand of time; which, while it eviscerates truth, also, fortunately, assuages animosities; will render justice to the pure fame of the venerable President. That his remaining days may be blessed with peace, health, and felicity, is, I cannot...
The Committee for receiving Donations for the Apprentices’, Library acknowledge the recpt. of Mr Adams’ noble present of the Sixty Four Volumes, of “Universal History” a work, which will be of the greatest utility to our Young Readers, they indeed are, a Library of themselves, and give a value to the collection which our warmest wishes & hopes have not dared to expect.—it would charm your...
Having observed that you condescend to take an interest in various literary objects, and particularly such as are intended to promote the improvement of the rising generation, I take the liberty to forward to you a small Geography and Atlas, and to beg your acceptance of them as a token of my high respect. Though they are little worthy of your notice, you may perhaps deign to cast your eye...
Your much esteemed favor was received a few days since, and I could not deny myself the pleasure of sending it to the press, though at the risk of being charged with Egotism —But the desire of the Publick is so strong to see every thing that falls from the pen of one of our earliest & most distinguished Statesmen and patriots, that I yielded to the wish of several of my friends in making it...
A communication from a source so respectable a source , containing sentiments so worthy of the occasion, and so honorable to the Writer, cannot be passed over in Silence—We rejoice that every great and good man feels deeply interested for the suffering greeks—We rejoice that the Venerable Patriots and Statesmen of America who Knew and felt the Perils of our own struggle for freedom can...