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mr Dexter will come to Boston tomorrow for the Trunks you must go with him to mr Crufts who when you pick out the Trunks will deliver them—I See that nobody here will attend to them if I do not—they are lodged at mr Thorndikes Store Custer lies very dangerously sick your GM MHi : Adams Papers.
So, so master John, your Back is up, because you have not been written to, as often as you thought your dignity required—why I really think there is Some reason for you to complain of your Hingham School Mates—but I beleive they are Scatterd now, not one of them remaining with mr Thimbull who were your companions—new ones Succeed Politeness requires that notice Should be taken of letters of...
I received your Letter by mr Beals, and was very glad to learn that you and your Brother had enterd School you will very soon get familiar with it, and if you do as well as you know how, you will not be behind your Class. If Charles is really unwell; mrs Welsh will give him something to take, and he must restrain his appetite which was too keen for the season of the Year. I would have you call...
enclosed is the money which mrs Welsh advanced upon your account which you will pay her, and get her to Sign the Receit enclosed. you have not sent your shoes to be mended—& Charl e s if bare foot I have no compassion for as he would not take the trouble to call upon the shoe maker, he ought to feel the concequence—I Shall expect to see you on Saturday your affectionate G M MHi : Adams Papers.
By mistake two of your Shirts were Sent without marking. ask mrs Welsh if She will let her woman mark them for you. I Send your Jacket & overalls Charles coat & two of your Shirts Send me word if the Jacket fits & the overalls—and Send a waistcoat that fits you to make one by. let Charles have your white Jacket. I do not think It is worth altering. I Shall have an other Nankeen made for you—I...
I have heard, with some surprize, your proposition to Mr Adams that we should once more take up our residence with you. It is not unnatural that you should wish to have your Children with you, but with so numerous a family as ours it cannot be expected that we should at all times promote your enjoyment, and there may be many times when the necessary wants and recreations of Children would be a...
The past week has scarcely been marked by any occurrence worth relating in a letter, the weather after having been intensely warm on Sunday and Monday cooled off and we have had an Easterly storm ever since. This makes me quite dull as I prefer the Sun with all his fires. General La Fayette after having thrust his benign countenance among us; has gone to other places to make them happy for a...
On this day, one which in this part of the country is considered much as Thanksgiving day is in New England, I beg leave to express my wishes for your welfare & comfort during the cold weather which accompanies the Season in which the festival comes. It is not properly speaking a festival this Year with us as it comes on a Sunday, but the family dinner which for years past hast happened at my...
It was an unexpected pleasure which I received in your letter of the 17th. of last month, as I had not calculated upon your making such an exertion merely for me. If by writing I can do aught to amuse you a moment I shall think that I am well repaid but my vanity was not so great as to desire an answer, however gratified I may have been at receiving one. The General La Fayette is near on his...
My last letter I believe, evinced a degree of excitement very uncommon for me. But the transactions of that week were of a nature to act upon the blood of persons less impetuous even than myself. And the feeling was shared by almost all persons in the city. You are probably aware of what took place the day before I wrote although at that time I was ignorant of it myself. Persons will praise or...
I am glad to find you so happy at college and I myself assure you I feel as much so here there is one thing I regret and that is the loss of Mr Gould for certainly let Ironside be himself whatever genius he may yet he does not know the right way of keeping school nor will he till he keeps order; but as it is now every boy in the school is talking from the minute he goes in till he comes out. I...
The summer has come upon us very rapidly without giving us any of our usual Spring weather. Some few days within the past week have been almost as warm as any during the last summer. This brings us at least peace and quiet. Almost all strangers have left the place and many members of Congress. Both houses adjourn tomorrow, having been excessively hurried in their business during the week....
The warm season has come again and delightful as it is to me, is no doubt also very acceptable to you, Sir. The prevailing rule I believe, is a moderate heat, and one which is perhaps better adapted to afford ease to you than extremes either way. My attachment to warm weather excludes any idea of a medium or rather of what is commonly called so. And it is for this reason that I prefer the...
Since my last letter the whole family have been suffering from violent colds. I did not escape lightly, on the contrary, I was two days in greater trouble than was ever occasioned me by any cold before. My father has also been attacked and indeed every member of our family in regular order. To make the assertion more general, I might say that the whole City had been under the influence of this...
Another fortnight has passed since I had the honour to address you, and the end of it has found me but little wiser than the beginning. It has in fact been spent in the lounging dissipated manner which Washington society so soon produces. My seceding from society produced so much dissatisfaction in the family, that I have again thrown myself into the middle of the stream and my law in...
The past week has brought us summer weather and makes the city look as green as it is wont, in the month of May. This appearance is the more strange to us, as we do not associate easily with it the idea of Congress. But as we are to have a session here until June this season there will be abundant time to become reconciled to this state of things. Politics are now much the order of the day as...
I was much delighted yesterday by the receipt of the letter from you. It assured me that you was still in good health and spirits, about which things I was a little anxious, from the time I had heard of your intention to “submit” as Mr Browere not inappropriately terms it. I had been very much incommoded I must confess, in the operation, as my hair and ears were not so easily extracted from...
"Who doth time gallop withal?" Instead of answering this as Shakespeare has done, I would say that it gallops with persons in the days of youth and pleasure without any great care to oppress them. Such I deem mine to be and such is the passage of time. It is hardly possible to keep the regular count of the weeks as they go, and to notice the revolution of months, which has already brought me...
I have even less than usual of interest to relate today, since Tuesday last, I have been entirely at home owing to a slight attack of sickness. And my time has been employed in reading the later productions of the day and thereby making up a deficiency which I have long been guilty of. Indeed it is such a waste of time generally speaking that were it not for the ugly appearance one makes in...
One week has passed already since my arrival here and to us by no means a quiet one. General La Fayette arrived two days after me and has since engrossed almost all our attention. Dinner has succeeded to dinner and party to party, although the weather has been warm constantly. We now enjoy a few days of quiet as my Father and John have accompanied the General and suite and will not return for...
An unaccountable fit of dullness and inability to do any thing, prevented my writing to you on last Sunday, the weather is of such a nature as to create languor to an astonishing degree. It is very warm and humid which produces colds almost universally. Our family has not escaped for my brother and Elizabeth have both been affected and I although free from cold, have not been in a State to...
Time has slipped by most unaccountably during my resolutions constantly expressed of writing to you. And I can give little or no account of it. The arrival of the family safe and sound at home again was matter of so much gratification after my anxieties that I have scarcely been sufficiently composed since to do any thing. And each day has closed with the consciousness on my part of much left...
In the present dearth of news, and of every thing to make a letter interesting, I am afraid I shall only be very stupid in my attempt to amuse. But since it is the day on which I am bound to write and you expect it from me, I hope this will be sufficient apology for any want of animation which you may perceive. The monotonous course of life so very secluded as the one in which I now live gives...
A fortnight has passed over, since I last addressed you, and scarcely any thing of interest has happened. The City having considerably recovered from the severe epidemic which has been raging here, the gaity is becoming rather more extensive, and the number of Strangers who accompany the Supreme Court upon its Session here, have a tendency to enliven us. The town is always most full at this...
I Thank Heaven my dear Grand father that I am so happy as to announce to you the Election of Uncle, by 13 states—It is indeed Virtue triumphant & an event which will add much to your happiness—I never saw a stronger expression of real feeling than in an old Gentleman, a perfect stranger to all the family, who came in great haste from the Capitol to congratulate Aunt—God knows says he I...
Sensible of the honour I received by your permitting me to prefix your name to the second and third editions of this work, I am desirous that the present should appear under the same respectable and distinguished patronage. The talents and virtues which you have exhibited, both in public and private life, will, I trust, be duly appreciated by the rising generation; and it is my ardent wish,...
Your account of the first part of your journey, is quite as entertaining and instructive as is that of the latter part, recorded in your former letter. The seventy persons on board the steam boat who were obliged to sleep in mats covered with a blanket, reminded me of my excellent friend and physician, Dr Holbrook’s account of the treatment of the small pox in Canada when our Revolutionary...
Your frolicsome letter of the 10th of October has come to hand this morning and amidst the sinking and fainting infirmities of age has given me a temporary flash of spirits and has tirminated in the solid comfort of the arrival of your father and Mother and Miss Mary at Washington after tot et tanta discrimina rerum. The ladies must have had a severe trial your Mother is so much in the habit...
In the reign of Charles 1st of England, Henry Adams came to America from Devonshire and settled at Mount Wollaston with eight sons, one of whom returned to England. Four removed to Medfield, Medway, Bellingham and the neighbouring towns—two to Chelmsford Thomas and Samuel by name; Joseph only, my great grandfather, and the great grandfather of Samuel Adams of Boston, remained in this place...
Your letter, of the 21st. sprightly and entertaining like all the rest, has been recieved. I participate in all your apprehensions concerning the election. The odium, which has been conjured up against the family, is indeed a formidable motive of national action. Not a reason, not an argument even original; it is a prejudice! and it is a consolation to see that it does not prevail in...
Your letter of the 28th: Decr. is an epistle of a sage. I will tell you a story, of ancient days. “When I was a Sophomore at College, my mother and her Sister Ann Adams, Wife of my Uncle Ebenezer Adams, came to spend the day with me. On looking round my room, they thought I wanted several little articles of accomodation, which they did not see. They asked why I had not this thing, that thing,...
I thank you for two letters written at two notable periods of your life one at the happy meeting of your family at Providence and New York, the other at Washington all in health written with the vivacity, and spirit for which you are so remarkable. They gave me and the whole family a great deal of pleasure and excite an appetite for your account of the first part of your journey. We have...
Your letter of the 18th of January is full of candid, temperate and accurate criticism I know not whether a more lively idea of Mr Clay’s eloquence could have been given me, by Aristotle, Longinus, Dyonisius Halicarnassus, Horace, Vida, Boileau and Pope. Mr Clay must have great powers of Oratory. Your remarks upon emphasis, are judicious and important. I have written this pedantic list of...
In compliance with your request in your condescending favr. of the 30th. Ulto. that I should transmit the Pedigree of my family. I applied to my Father, who had taken some pains to inform himself respecting his Ancestry—being incited thereto, very much by the important circumstance, that One of the name had risen to the highest honours of our Country; and others, to very distinguished honours...
Your kind letter of the 22d: February No 15 is as pleasing to me as the former numbers. I have not seen the Pilot. The young ladies, you speak of instead of tinkling verses and frivolous novels, had better read Dr Barrows sermons, get them by heart, and deeply impress them upon their souls. As to the Caucus I am glad you have not written me upon that, fir it si a very unedifying topic. The...
I recieved, as usual with great delight your letter of the 12th inst. Your account of all things is satisfactory—but on this great occasion, my dear Grandson, let us all reflect on the obligations this event imposes on us. Our joys ought to be no greater than the joys of the public. We ought all of us to collect ourselves and not suffer a single unbecoming word or action to escape us. A friend...
I also am an advocate first for universal suffrage 2dly. for universal emancipation 3dly for universal toleration & fourthly for universal education. But I must still inquire, what is meant by universal suffrage? If reading & writing were necessary, that rule would in the middle ages have excluded all mankind except the clergy and a greater part of them and even Charlemagne himself. I have...
Your No 42 has given me pleasure like the rest. I ought to thank you for your assiduity in giving me kind entertainment in so great a number of letters. As you have all the Newspapers, you have all the news that we have and more. New England has settled down in calm satisfaction with her own vote. The circumstance you mentioned of Quincy & Braintree and their unanimnity has delighted me as...
Nothing from your Family gives me more pleasure than to hear as I do, that you are a diligent Student and good Schollar. Do you know the meaning, of the Words, Patience of Application ? Patience of Study ? My little reading, you may well Suppose is not fresh in my head: but I remember to have somewhere read that Sir Isaac Newton used to Say that “all he had done in Science was by patient...
I am much pleased with your Translation The Character of Anacreon is one of the many Mysteries of Antiquity which the Researches of your whole life will not be able to unridle. He did well to renounce the Heroes for he either knows nothing of the Sons of Atreous of Cadmus the Theban King or of Hercules and his twelve Labours or if he knows any Thing he dared not tell what he knows. It is...
I thank you for a pretty volume of Poetic effusions; for want of sight I have not read them, but in those which have been read to me, I perceive nothing inconsistent with morals, on the contrary, a social spirit of charity humanity, and benevolence, Of the Poetical merit I pretend not to be a critical judge. From your name I conjecture that you are a bee, from one of the six swarms , that...
Your letter of the 27th. of December has given me great pleasure—though I shuddered at the idea of the dreadful night you discribed—The Season of the Year concealed the beauties of the Country through which you pass traveled and must have taken away most of the pleasures—But you must have been amply repaied by the joys of meeting your Parents, and Brother, and other friends—A residence in...
If you can obtain leave of absence I wish for the pleasure of your Company here on the twelfth of the month—and I wish you to present my Compliments to the President, and Tutors whose consent is requisite, and ask the favour of them There is not any topick of Conversation here, but the horrours of duelling—and Mail Robbers, we do not meddle with politicks— love to John—and am affectionately /...
I thank you for your kind Letter—and your Father still more for his permission in permiting you to send me a Copy of his Message, which if it had not been delay’d in Boston, would have reached me before any body else— It is every thing I could wish, or desire it to be, it cannot fail to give general, or, if not, universal satisfaction to the nation, and to all Nations—It proves so particular...
You have been the most punctual correspondent that I ever had except your Brother—but for four weeks past I have been constantly disappointed, whenever I have enquired for a Letter from John—but I have constantly been compelled to make an apology by recollecting that you have been overwhelmed with business of more importance to the public, than soothing my curiosity— Yet I never can be easy...
Your account of the Death and Character of General R. G. Harper gave me a great deal of pain, he was a man indeed of eminent character and great talents, he made a great figure in Congress and was considered a rival to Mr. Smith, till he was sent to Portugal; I am not able to give you any account of his Parentage, or the place of his birth, or that of his Education; The first that I ever heard...
I take pleasure in introducing to your acquaintance the Revd. Mr Barber, who has been some years attached to the Catholic Seminary at this place and to the College at Georgetown, and is now going to reside at Claremont in New Hampshire. In passing through Boston he proposes to pay you a visit, from which I am persuaded you will derive equal satisfaction with him. I am, Dear Sir, your faithful...
You have been made acquainted with the controversy in which I have been for some Months engaged in relation to transactions at the Negotiation of Ghent. As the subject is one in which the defence of my own character and that of two of my Colleagues was inseparably connected with principles of deep concernment to this Union, I have thought it necessary to collect in one publication the papers...
The enclosed note from Mr King, will inform you of the Event of this day, upon which I can only offer you , my congratulations, and ask your blessing and prayers. Your affectionate and dutiful Son P.S. Have the goodness to cause the Note from Mr King, to be sent back to me. MHi : Adams Papers.
It has given me great satisfaction to learn that a part has be assigned to you to perform at the exhibition, fixed for the 30th. of April—and should be well pleased if it if it were in my power to be present at the performance—But as that will not be practicable, I wish you to let me know what dialogue it is that you are to speak—I feel also some anxiety for your performance, and quite...