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Documents filtered by: Author="Johnson, Chapman" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency"
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I am exceedingly sorry to learn from your letter of the 18. that Mr. Key has availed himself of our indulgence and resigned his place in the University— I see no serious objection to the permission which he asks to continue in office till the middle of August. It would certainly not be proper that he should vacate his seat till the 20. July, when the examination will be over, and the interval...
I have received your letter of the 24. September, communicating Mr. Longs wish to resign his office in the University, at the end of the present session— I feel disposed to act as liberally towards Mr. Long, on this occasion as our duty to the institution will allow; but I doubt whether we should be justified in giving an unconditional assent to his leaving us, at the end of the session. I am...
I have just received a communication from General Cocke, enclosing Mr. Shorts letters, on the subject of Doctr. Jones, also your letter with Mr. Browns and Mr. Bruces. I wrote to you a few days since, from this place, informing you, that doctr. Patterson had declined being a candidate to for the chair of Nat. Philosophy, in our University, and giving you an extract from his letter,...
On my return home the other day I received a letter, from a friend in New York, mentioning Mr. James Renwick, at present professor of Nat. philosophy, in the college of Columbia, as a probable candidate for our vacant chair—and speaking of him in very high terms of commendation—Mr. Renwick does not wish to be regarded as a candidate, but his friend writes to obtain information to enable him to...
I have received your letter of the 9th. and am very sorry that my enquiries of Mr. Trist should have given you the trouble of writing; and am still more concerned to learn that you are indisposed. I sincerely hope your influenza and fever, have left you, and that you are restored to the enjoyment of good health. I received your communication on the subject of Mr. Harrison, and forwarded your...
I hope you will pardon my delay in answering your letter of December 19th. when I tell you, that ever since its receipt, I have been in duress, by the labors of my office, and by those which neither belonged to my office, nor should have been admitted into it— I now return you the letter of Mr. Trist, on Mr. Walker’s subject—and proceed to perform a promise I made to Genl. Cocke, but which I...
Your letter of the 24. March, accompanied, by the testimonials in favor of Mr. Ritchie and Mr. Dodd, was received, in the due course of mail; and I have been ever since expecting an opportunity to consult our brethren Mr. Cabell and gen: Cocke. Soon after receiving it, I learned that Mr. Cabell was in Washington, to remain there but a few days, and return through Richmond, on his way to...
As soon as I arrived at home, I wrote to Doctor Harrison, on the subject of the professorship of antient languages. In consequence of it, he visited me last night, and is now with me. I have explained to him the wishes of the visitors upon the subject, particularly their desire that he should devote his whole time to the duties of the station, in order that he may maintain as much as possible...
Since I inclosed you an extract of a letter from Mr Leigh recommending Colo. de la Peña for the appointment of tutor in the school of Modern languages, I have received several other communications, on the subject of that appointment which I send you herewith– One is from Mr. Stanard very strongly recommending Colo. Colonna, an Italian gentleman now in Richmond. He has been residing there for a...
I returned from the university day before yesterday, the visitors having finished their business and separated, wednesday evening—We had a bare quorum only till friday, when the arrival of Mr. Cabell, who had been detained by indisposition gave us five members, Mr. Monroes successor, Genl. Brodnax, not being with us. We regreted your absence very much, and the more, as it was caused by...