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Documents filtered by: Author="Gilmer, Francis Walker" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency"
Results 31-54 of 54 sorted by editorial placement
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I have just arrived in 35 days from Cowes, of Continuel tempest, emaciated to a shadow, not by sea sickness only, but by the bitter aggravations of a violent fever the whole way, exasperated by want of a physician, of medicine, of food, of rest, & of attendance. I shall be here some time to recruit. I am happy to inform you, I have engaged all the professors but for the chair of natural...
I wrote you a few words yesterday merely to apprize you of my arrival. I am likely to be confined here with the Doctors some weeks, God knows how many, and now send you a letter from D. Stewart whom I did not see, for his state of health made it improper to call on him: & another from J. Campbell the Poet. all Campbell expects is, the patronage of the university & of yourself for his young...
D r Blaettermann will arrive in the Trident, bound from London, to new York; & I wonder he is not in. The other professors will arrive in the Liverpool Packet of the 16 th octr. at new York also, & that too, must be here in a few days. My health is still so low, & my future strength so precarious, after such a continued & dreadful shock, that I could not with propriety give a positive...
I observe from the paper, that both the Trident, & the Columbia (Liverpool packet) have just arrived at this port, and no doubt our professors with them; but being too ill to be of any service to them, I may not perhaps see them. They could not at the time procure a passage to the Chesapeak. It may be of use to you in making fixtures for their reception, to know, that, Blaettermann has a wife...
During my illness, which still confines me to my room, I have sounded Torrey, as to the Professorship of Natural history. With very high expectations from the university, he for particular reasons, prefers West Point. The next best person I can hear of, and undoubtedly superior to any I saw in Gr. B is D r J. P. Emmet, son of the eminent Counsel of New York. He I find will accept it with...
I have this moment received your letter of Nov r 30 th . most of the inquiries I had already answered by anticipation. I am sorry we cannot obtain Torrey, but believe Emmet will make quite as able a lecturer, on chemistry, he is superior. He will certainly accept it. I have seen him at my room. as to the law chair, I am utterly dismayed by the labour it will require, so soon after a long &...
I arrived here on saturday after a very fatiguing journey from New York, staying two days in Baltimore, & as many in Norfolk. I did not write to you after receiving your last letter because I hoped to see you before this. I find myself so weak & so much exhausted by the Steam boats, that I think it imprudent to try the stages to charlottesville. as soon however as I can bear the journey I...
I have deferred writing to you, with the daily expectation of setting out to see you. My strength after so long a confinement naturally returns very slowly, and even now it would fatigue me too much to travel by the stage to Albemarle, nor can I consent to accept the private carriages which have been offered me. I am very desirous to see you, & to report to you fully my conduct, opinions &c....
Mr. Marx, in writing to me from London, nov r 6 th says, “the professors sailed in the Competitor.” He does not mention on what day. This gives them on any estimate, a voyage of near 80 days. Tho alarming, the case is not desperate. It grieves me however, that their delay, should frustrate our opening in Feby. which I knew you had so anxiously at heart. My recovery is constantly retarded by...
It was my intention on leaving England, to have drawn up during the voyage, an extended report of all my proceedings on the mission with which I was entrusted. A most boisterous passage, with continued & severe sickness prevented me, and since my arrival, I have had neither leisure nor strength for the undertaking. A short account of my pecuniary transactions however, I feel myself. bound to...
I send by Mr. Garrett, a short report, such as my state of health enables me to make out at a sitting, without being irksome. I will enter into details when I see you, which shall be as soon as the roads are passable. I send also, a catalogue of the books & apparatus. Part only of the books have arrived. They should be opened without delay. Some delay I fear will occur, in sending a portion of...
Intelligence has at last reached us, that the Competitor is not lost; it put into Plymonth in the gale, & was there on the 8 th Dec r We may expect the professors every day. The delay is vexatious, but less distressing than the loss of the professors would have been. MoSHi : Francis Walker Gilmer Papers.
I have just received from Key the gratifying intelligence, that he, Bonnycastle, and Dunglison, are all in norfolk. They will be here early Wednesday morning, and in Charlottesville I suppose, by the Saturday’s stage. I had fixed on wednesday last, for setting out to albemarle. we had four days continued rain (& it is now raining) which will delay me another week. MoSHi : Francis Walker Gilmer...
I received yesterday from Mr. Key, a letter from D r Birkbeck of London, inclosing another from Mr. Harwood, of which I deem it my duty to apprize the visitors of the university. Mr. Harwood is the Lecturer on Natural History, at the Royal Institution, London. He was the only person I had any idea of employing in this department, of whom I could hear. His engagements however would not permit...
I kept no copies of the numerous notes which passed between Mr. Barlow and myself, on the subject of Mr. Bonnycastles engagement, but I have a very distinct recollection of the offer & assurances I made. you will observe, that the contract with D r Blaettermann allows him only $1000 salary after the first year. Without any very specific understanding with D r Dunglison & Mr. Key, in my...
I send you a very full account of all that passed between Mr B. & myself. I am astonished he should be so entirely in error, from any thing I ever said or, wrote, for I know not what Mr Barlow may have told him. I am surprised that the books from the continent which were to be shipped in Nov r were not shipped on 29 th Jany. I cannot understand this. I have been waiting 6 weeks for a letter...
I have received from Mr Minor, a note urging me to call on you to day. Had my health permitted, I should have been with you weeks ago, but I can neither bear the fatigue of so long a ride, nor of continued conversation, and should be every way a troublesome & unprofitable guest to you. I hope in a week, to be able to see you. But my present health, & the long continuance of my sickness, render...
When I wrote to you last about the claim of Mr. Bonnycastle, I had not the least conception of the light in which he viewed the case, nor of the necessity of some speedy decision on it. I supposed there could be no occasion for you to act until the forfeiture was claimed, or I should certainly have taken a more immediate interest in his behalf. The letter I wrote contained my recollection of...
on my arrival here, I found two letters and a bill of lading from Gowan and Marx, concerning the books you have already received. His letter does not apprise me, whether the two shipments of books he mentions, completes the order. a copy of a letter from Bohn to Marx, mentions also, a small box of books consisting of additions, omissions &c. to that part of the order to be executed in London....
I received your letter of the 5 th and should have called to see you, but for my constant unwillingness to add another to the crowd of visitors who harass & oppress you. My health is much improved, and I hope the Springs will quite restore it to me. I set out tomorrow or the next day for “Bowyers White Sulphur,” where I shall remain about three weeks. MoSHi : Francis Walker Gilmer Papers.
I reached this place last monday exhausted by fatigue & long sickness almost to death. The daily hope of being better, & able to visit you, has prevented my even sending to inquire after your health. I shall wait on you in a few days. Mr. Johnson (whom I saw at Lynchburg) had given me a great deal of very unpleasant intelligence of the university. The temper of Mssrs. Key & Long toward me as...
I am here looking after a mild air, and have had for eighteen days the most unpleasant weather I ever knew, at this season. If I have strength to lecture, I shall begin on the 1 st Feby. I am tired of long inactivity, and had rather die in harness than in the stable. I found a door to connect the chamber with the study in the Corinthian pavilion, absolutely necessary to any comfort, and hope...
I have delayed perhaps longer than I ought informing you, that the state of my health renders it impossible I should join the university by February. For my own part, I have been so long sick, & growing worse, that I have little hope of ever being good for any thing again. I know the delicacy which the interests of the university requires. There will be a considerable law class concevened...
I am glad to hear you are so well. My health is such that I can only say I have denied every body. I could not talk with you two minutes without injury. Moreover I am forbidden to go down a high pair of stairs. When I can hold a conversation & leave my room, I shall still be proud of the honour you now offer me. MoSHi : Francis Walker Gilmer Papers.