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I received some weeks ago from our excellent friend Mr. Corrêa, his farewell to Virginia, and to all whose kindness has made it dear to him. It was natural that the friendship with which you had honored him, and the repeated civilities he had received from you, should be remembered when he was about to leave our country. He especially charges me, to preserve in your memory, the sentiments of...
In the mission on which, you, and the other visitors have deputed me, I must of necessity rely a good deal on the representations of others abroad. It is of great importance therefore, that I should have the assistance of men of talent, learning, and integrity. Excuse me then for asking of you the favor to give me two letters, one to our Minister Mr. Rush, and the other to Sr. James...
It was my intention on leaving England, to have drawn up during the voyage, an extended report of all my proceedings on the mission with which I was entrusted. A most boisterous passage, with continued & severe sickness prevented me, and since my arrival, I have had neither leisure nor strength for the undertaking. A short account of my pecuniary transactions however, I feel myself bound to...
I am penetrated with regret at the death of your illustrious friend, and I would fain call him mine— Mr. DuPont (de Nemours) —It is a consolation to me that I had redeemed before his death every promise which I ever made him.—His treatise on National Education was translated, of which I apprized him before I heard that he was indisposed. So long as he lived his own genius preserved the...
I have now the honor to inclose you the subscription to the central college . I have set about manuscript papers in some other counties with a request that they be forwarded to you or M r Madison . Some subscriptions will be made in Fauquier . P.S. one gentleman from particular circumstances has subscribed 300$ less than he at one time promised—which makes the whole amount that much less than...
I inclose this letter to Mr. Jefferson both because it is an injustice to Ticknor to deliver even a message from him in any other words than his own, and because I am sure it will give him pleasure to hear young Terril thus spoken of by such a man. In the ‘ darkness visible ’ of Richmond , it is a happiness, a privilege, to be illuminated by the radiance of such a mind. If the enemies of...
I have heard with great pleasure of your convalescence. by winter you will be quite well to enjoy the triumph of the university which is now beyond all danger. It is highly probable that you will be consulted by friends from Philadelphia as to a successor to Dorsey & our excellent friend Doct r Wistar . Should you be—I must beg of you to converse with Colo: Randolph on the pretensions of...
It is never without self-reprehension that I make a request which can for a moment draw your mind from the great concerns in which it is constantly engaged. But you are the only person living who can answer a very interesting question which has arisen in the general court. A citizen of Virginia has been indicted before that tribunal for a felony committed in George Town in the district of...
Mr William B. Page of Frederick has put into my hands as counsel a long record, from which I find, that on the 3 d Augt. 1787. a judgement was obtained by yourself and Mr Eppes executors of Mr Wayles against Col: Byrd for £96.. 12. 9.. 3. and costs—when assets. Mr Page is executor of Mrs Byrd who was executrix of her husband: he will soon be able to pay the debt: the attention of counsel will...
The court of Appeals has given judgement in one of the usury cases [Taylor. v. Bruce] and I hasten to apprise you of the result. I should have done it with more pleasure had the decision been different. I do not understand the particular nature of the transaction in which you are indorser for Col. Nicholas. I must therefore give you an outline of the case of Taylor & Bruce leaving to you the...
One of the last injunctions of our excellent & ever to be cherished friend Mr Corrêa, was, that I should send a small quantity of the ashes of Salsola Kale to D r Cooper, that he might learn whether it contains as much Soda when growing remote from the sea, as when contiguous to it. The season being rather far advanced for a fair experiment even when I returned to Richmond, I lost little time...
I have this moment received the farewell of Mr. Corrêa to Virginia, to you, and to us all. I cannot so well acquit myself of the obligation his kindness has laid me under, as by inclosing his letter to you. I who know the sincerity of the sentiments it contains, can appreciate its worth. Read it, and be good enough to return it at your leisure. MoSHi : Francis Walker Gilmer Papers.
I inclose you a little treatise which I wrote in albemarle during my summer’s visit; on what is growing every day to be an important question in jurisprudence & politics. The notions of Bentham are every day becoming more popular in Virginia, and it is time the other side should be heard. I do not know your opinions on the subject, nor do I hope to edify you at all on the matter; I send you...
Permit me dear Sir, to introduce to your acquaintance, Mr. Greenhow, a well informed young gentleman, who just returning from Italy, to his native state, is desirous of visiting Monticello. At the same time, I beg to present to you, a copy of Cicero’s “Re Publica,” lately recovered by the diligence of the Abbé Mai. It is a rare satisfaction, to have it in my power to offer to so distinguished...
I avail myself of the first moment of leisure, to answer your letter of the 23 d nov r which requires the less consideration, because the same wish had already been intimated to me, long ago, by three of your colleagues. An acceptance of the ulterior appointment, as you observe, goes to an entire change of my whole plan of life: and the prudence or propriety of making so total an alteration in...
I have this day received of Alexander Garrett, Bursar of the university of Virginia, two sets of bills of exchange, amounting to £2.110.. 7..0. Sterling, drawn by Joseph Marx on Mesrs. Gowan & Marx of London. The first set of bills, amounting to Eighteen hundred pounds Sterling, to be applied to the purposes of the university, according to instructions; the second set, amounting to three...
I have received both packets you forwarded. I arrived here this morning at 10 o’clock, and have already taken a birth, on board the Cortes, (Capt. De Cost) which sails on Saturday (the 8 th ) at 10’ o’clock for Liverpool. Permit me to suggest that if the Bursar has any option in the matter, he would find the Bank of Virginia more prompt and liberal in its dealings than the F.rs. The Cortes is...
Within this hour, I have arrived at Liverpool, after a voyage of 26 days from New York to Hollyhead. We were six days beating in St. George’s channel, against a wind dead ahead and it still continuing, I determined to disembark at Hollyhead, & to proceed by land thro’ Wales. I was obliged to come by this place, else I should have gone directly to London. I shall remain here only long enough,...
I wrote to you at Liverpool informing you of my arrival on the 6 th Hatton lying immediately in my way to London, I determined to call on D r Parr: unluckily for me, he had gone to Shrewsbury; and I shall be obliged to visit Hatton again, before I go to Oxford. Since my arrival in London eight days ago, Mr. Rush (who is soon to return to the US) has been so constantly engaged, that he could do...
I left London for this place on the 22 d of June, immediately I had procured from Mr. Rush, the necessary letters. I found on my arrival here, the same evening, that the long vacation at the university, had virtually commenced three weeks before, that is while I was at sea. of the three persons to whom I had letters, he on whom Mr. Brougham principally relied, was absent on a visit of a week....
Doctor Parr (Samuel) was delighted with your letter, and received me with the greatest kindness. I have now been two days with him. Tho’ not above 76 years of age, I soon discovered, that he was too infirm, to be of much service to us in the selection of professors. Tho’ he is our decided and warm friend, my interview with him has been the most discouraging. He has however been of great...
It is now more than a fortnight since I arrived at the ancient capitol of Scotland. The first four or five days were spent, in making inquiries for persons fit for any of our purposes, but especially for anatomy, natural history, and natural philosophy, for I had well satisfied myself in England, that we could not, except by chance, procure either of the latter there. In all Scotland, from all...
My last letters from Edinburgh gave you so gloomy an account of our prospects, that I hasten to relieve the picture. When I saw needy young men, living miserably up 10 or 12 stories, in the wretched climate of Edinburgh reluctant to join us, I did not know where we could expect to raise recruits. While at Cambridge, I became acquainted in Trinity College, with an intelligent & fine young man,...
I have given you so much bad news, that I determined to delay writing a few days, that I might communicate something more agreable. When I returned from Edinburgh, where my ill success, is in fact to be ascribed (I am well assured) to the ill will of some of our Eastern Bretheren, who had just before me, been in Scotland, I determined to remain at London, as the most convenient point for...
Instruments to be furnished for the University of Virginia by Mr: Cary optician 182 Strand. £. s. D 1. a fine feet acromatic telescope with object glass 3¾ diameter on tripod stand, & with equatorial motions { 84. 0. 0 2. Solar microscope for opake & transparent objects 16. 16. 0 3. Lens convex, concave, plano-convex (1 of each) 1.
This is to recommend to your favorable reception, D r Dunglison, our professor of anatomy. &c. I have already mentioned him to you in a previous letter, as a man of talents, well acquainted with the branches he is to teach, & a writer of eminence on medical & physiological subjects. In addition to all that, he is highly amiable, and will be an accession to our society. MoSHi : Francis Walker...
This covenant entered into at London, this 28 th day of September in the year 1824, between Francis W. Gilmer attorney in fact for the university of Virginia, of the one part, and George Long, of the other part Witnesseth that the said Gilmer attorney in fact as aforesaid, doth hereby appoint the said Long, a professor in the said university of Virginia, and covenants with the said Long that...
This covenant entered into on the 28 th day of September in the year 1824, at London, between Francis W. Gilmer attorney in fact for the university of Virginia of the one part, and Robley Dunglison of the other part, Witnesseth; that the said Gilmer attorney in fact for the Rector and visitors of the university of Virginia, doth hereby appoint the said Dunglison a professor in the said...
This covenant entered into sat London, on this 28th day of September in the year 1824, between Francis W. Gilmer attorney in fact for the university of Virginia of the one part, and Thomas Hewett Key of the other part, Witnesseth, that the said Gilmer attorney in fact for the rector & visitors of the university of Virginia doth hereby appoint the said Key a professor in the said university,...
I have made only the following draughts on Gowan & Marx, on account of the University—none of the money having ever passed thro my hands. viz. 20 th Sep £80. 0.0 29 th Sep. 21.16.6 15 t octr 1129. 7.6 do 50. 0.0 do. 50.