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    • Brockenbrough, Arthur S.
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    • post-Madison Presidency

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Documents filtered by: Author="Brockenbrough, Arthur S." AND Period="post-Madison Presidency"
Results 11-20 of 111 sorted by editorial placement
The late very extraordinary, harsh, cruel and unjust proceedings of the Visitors towards me compells me in self vindication to make known to you all their acts, and to require of you that justice, which your station as the head of the Institution and as an honest and upright man I am confident you will not withhold—I will give you in detail all that passed between me & the Visitors. I was...
A paper was put into my hands a few days since desiring me to make two distinct proposals relative to the proctorship to the University — 1 st What salary I should require to superintend the buildings at the University with the advantage (exclusively) of boarding the students so soon as a Hotel could be built for that purpose, the fare at which to be prescribed by the visitors , the Proctor to...
This letter will be delivered to you by M r Arthur Brockenbrough , who I anxiously hope you will be able to employ on some terms or other, I wish it most on your account, as I am sure he wou’d save you much trouble & vexation. I enclose two notes which you will be so good as to endorse & return to me by the mail. RC ( DLC ); endorsed by TJ as received 31 Mar. 1819 and so recorded in SJL . RC (...
I take the liberty to introduce to you the bearer, M r Arthur S: Brockenbrough . He goes up to see whether his services will be needed by the trustees of the university , and whether it would be worth his while to leave his occupations here. He is a man of great respectability. He was regularly bred a house-joiner, and has, I beleive, a good taste in architecture, of which the new banks in...
I expected to have had the pleasure of delivering the enclosed letters in person, but unexpected business has prevented it, if there is any prospect of my being usefuly usefully & profitably employed at the University you will please inform me , — If materials are easily come at I would probably become a large undertaker, the Salary of the Proctor alone I fear would not be a sufficient...
Will you do me the favor if not attended with too much inconvenience to send me down this evening or in the morning early the dimentions of the East range of Pavilions I wish to lay them off before I return to Rich d , or must I be governed by the size of Pavilion N o 1 which you handed me? I think we had better employ stone cutters by the piece & not by the day, by advertising the quantity of...
I must again trouble you on the subject of the University — In making the contracts for the brick work, I had placed the undertakers upon the same footing, but M r Perry objects to it stating that the payment is not agreeable to the his propositions which runs thus “and the brick work for the said buildings the same that Gen l Cocke paid Whitelaw
I have rec d your letter of the 27 th and shall attend to the contents— M r Ware writes me from Philadelphia that the vessel he intends coming round in will sail on the 26 th I look for him daily and shall accompany him and his brickmakers &c up, or be there about the same time, he states, Stone cutters can be had for $1.50 ⅌ day by paying their expences from Philadelphia to
Your two letters p r the last mail is this moment rec d (5 OClock P.M) the one enclosing a Df t on the President of the literary fund for eight hundred and forty dollars shall be attended as soon as possible, I should have been with you ’ere this but for the hope and expectation of the arrival of M r Ware and his hands, at any rate I shall be with you by the 8 th RC
Your favor is handed by your servant, the remitance of 45 Dollars to M r Perkins of Baltimore shall be attended to— I am sorry to hear of the cause of your detention, but am much pleased at your being still at Monticello — M r Michael has not shown much disposition towards making an experiment in this stone not having tuched it , in making arrangements for their board &c,