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Documents filtered by: Author="Barbour, James" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency"
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Immediately on the reciept of your private letter of the 22nd September I resorted to a seal maker of reputation in Pall Mall and gave him orders to execute the commission you submitted to my care—With but little taste in such matters I was obliged to confide in his—The result I send you enclosed—the cost you will see by his bill, which you will pay me when I return. I hope they will please...
Immediately on the receipt of your letter of the 22nd September I had an interview with Mr Long on the subject—He has promised me to use his best exertions to fulfil the wishes of the Visitors of the College—In addition I am carrying on a correspondence with Several literary men with a view to success— To the learned Professor Sandford of Glasgow I have written—my acquaintance with some of the...
It was a subject of very sincere regret, both, with me and my family, that from untoward circumstances we were deprived of the happiness of tendering to you and Mrs Madison, an affectionate farewell on the distant Journey we were about commencing—It will give you pleasure I am sure to learn that our voyage across the Atlantic, was so favorable as to exceed any one of the 145 passages, which...
We feel much obliged to you and Mrs Madison for your kind invitation to call on you before our leaving the neighbourhood—We had intended to do so as a mark of our regard and to take an affectionate farewell But we regret the suggestion of your inability to see us at Barboursville—and still hope to do so—Our Children will be up by thursday [se ennights] when we shall be most happy to see you...
It is with great reluctance that I have prevailed upon myself to address you, on the subject of this communication—Sustained however by the [commending] opinions of some of our most distinguished Citizens who entertain for you the profoundest respect and warmest friendship—and believing whatever may be your views that you cannot doubt for a moment the state of my feelings towards you or my...
After a diligent search among the files of this Department, and a personal inspection of the letter books the only document I could find of those referred to by you was Armstrong’s letter to Jackson of May 28th 1814— That I think you are in possession of. If not, and you wish it, or indeed any other paper belonging to the Department I will most gladly send you. I beg to offer you an assurance...
I received a letter some time past from M r Madison advising me of the arrival of a box of seeds, sent from France, addressed to him as President of the A. A. Society; and which he turned over to me—I immediately wrote to the French Consul of France requesting him to consign it to M r Allen of Fredericksburg or Moncure Robinson & Pleasants of Richmond—since which I have heard nothing of it—I...
I feel obliged to you for enlarging the number of my acquaintances by the addition of Doctor Dunglison and M r Long—Who as far as I have been able, from short interviews, to appreciate their Characters, are entitled to all the kind offices you recommend—and which I shall most cheerfully afford—A conversation with them on the State of the University, has revived an intention which I had formed...
Permit me to introduce to your acquaintance D r Gunnell, formerly of Virginia, but now a resident of this place—He is respectable alike, for his moral worth and professional acquirements—He visits the University: and feeling for you the same profound regard which is common to the rest of Mankind he is anxious to have the honor of paying you his respects—Hence I have taken the liberty of...
Yours of the 16 th is this moment received—The appeal you have made to me on the subject of the $50000, as a Virginian, and a Friend to the university, I feel no vanity in Saying, is justified by my zeal and exertions in promoting by all means within my power the desired result—The instant the law passed the Senate, after having at my instance been taken up out of order without which it would...