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There have been a multitude of American Vessels, wind–bound at Liverpool near two months, several of which have Letters for you, and for my father, and which I suppose will nearly all arrive about the same time—In the interval there will be a wide chasm during which you will be without advices from us, as we have now been long without any from you—The present will go by Mr A. H. Everett, who...
As the Season of business and of gaity in London, advances, we have found from the experience of the last year, a sort of necessity to be for some time nearer its centre than our residence at Little-Boston; and as a mezzo termine between a complete removal, and an inflexible adherence to the country, we have taken Apartments in Town by the week without altogether abandoning our rural...
We have been many weeks without receiving a line from you, or from any of our friends at Quincy—Your last was of 8. January, and then remarked on the mildness of the Season on that side of the Atlantic; corresponding with that which had been experienced here—But here it continued through the Winter, and to this day we have scarcely been visited with frost or snow, while we hear that in your...
The enclosed Letter is from Mr Le Dieu, and was received the day after you left London—As I did not notice the jr. on the superscription, I opened it, supposing it was for me; and on discovering the mistake closed it again, and now forward it by Mr Boyle who I trust will find you still in Paris. We went into town on Thursday with your two Brothers. Dined with Mr G. Joy—at Paper Buildings—saw...
Your kind Letters of 12 and 17. March, the latter enclosing one (copy) from Mr H. G. Otis to my father reached me on the same day with a Letter from the New President of the United States, informing me that with the concurrence of the Senate, he had appointed me to the Office just vacated by himself—I had never received from him any previous intimation that it was his intention to make this...
I have received your Letter of the 11th. and your mother has that of the 16th. from Paris. I wrote you by Mr Boyle, and have not written since, supposing a Letter could not reach Paris before you would have left it.—We shall from this day be constantly expecting your return, and I write this merely with the chance of its finding you at Bruxelles. We are preparing with all possible despatch to...
Mr et Madame Adams infiniment sensibles à toutes les attentions obligeantes, dont Monsieur le Comte et Madame la Comtesse de Lieven les ont honorés, pendant leur Séjour en Angleterre, et particulièrement a l’invitation aussi flatteuse que cordiale qu’ils viennent d’en recevoir de nommer un jour pour diner chéz eux, avant leur prochain départ, profitent de cette permission pour leur proposer...
Since my last letter to you, which was of 28 February I have received yours of 6 and 12 Feby both numbered 24. of 19 Feby. N 25. & of 13 april N. 26 with all their enclosures. Mr Ogdens Bill for £877.10. has also been duly received and paid. I am now so much hurried by the preparations for my departure that I have no time to trouble you with observations upon my affairs. The only instruction I...
Conformably to the Instruction which I have received from the President of the United States, by a Letter from Mr. Graham of the Department of State, upon my departure from this Country I leave in your care the business of the Mission to this Court until the arrival of a Minister or until the President shall otherwise direct. The papers relating to subjects of individual interests, upon which...
Last Saturday we spoke with two vessels, bound one to Bristol and the other to Liverpool. I missed those opportunities of writing you a line, to let you know we had proceeded till then safely upon our Voyage. We have now the prospect of another Vessel, in sight by which I propose to send you this. We have been this day one Calendar Month at Sea, and have performed two thirds of our Passage....
After a passage of fifty days from Cowes, we have this day landed from the Ship Washington; all well—We shall stay here only so long as may be indispensable for landing our baggage, and making other necessary arrangements. In the course of a week or ten days, I hope to enjoy the happiness of seeing once more, my dear father and you—Remaining in the meantime, ever affectionately your’s. MHi :...
I have but one instant to inform you that we arrived here yesterday; all well. Mr Coles also arrived in the Evening from Liverpool, and delivered to me your Letter of 17 June with the Dispatch for the Secretary of State, and the Packets from Mr G. Joy & Mr Bentham. W. S. Clarkson is below while I am writing: your family relations are well. We expect to see Mr and Mrs DeWint to-morrow. I go...
Order on T. B. Adams—in favour of W. S. Clarkson for $200— Receipts. 1817. Augt. 11. One Hundred Napoleons 361:20. of T. B. A. order in favr of W. S Clarkson 200: Septr: 4. Order Bank U.S. Boston favr. J. P. DeWint 400 Cash. 300 9. Cash. 300. 17. Bank US. Philadelphia. Order on Washington 780. 18.
Of your qualifications for filling with honour to yourself and credit to your Country any Consular Situation in Europe to which you might be appointed, I am so well assured from the personal knowledge which I am happy to have had the opportunity of obtaining, and the fairness and respectability of your character, that no reference to the testimony of any other person can be necessary. Of not...
I enclose herewith an order upon the U.S. Branch Bank at New York, for 460. Dollars, with many thanks to you for the loan of the Money. We are to leave Quincy this Morning and Boston tomorrow, for our Journey Southward—Miss Welsh accompanies us New-York, where we hope to arrive by the Steam Boat from New Haven next Saturday Morning.—My intention will be to proceed from New-York next Monday....
Quincy Farm. House in Naussau Street. 1. Do 2 Do 3. House &c in Court Street. House in Hancock Street. Neponset Bridge Shares 6. Braintree & Weymouth Turnpike. 10. Middlesex Canal. 12— State Bank do. 45.— 2700. N.E. Insurance Co. 55. 5500 Fire and Marine do. Boston Bank— MHi : Adams Papers.
I have placed to your credit as my Agent the sum of ten thousand Dollars, in the United States Branch Bank, which you are to employ as follows, and in no other manner without express authority from me hereafter. I have authorized Messers: Payne and Co. to purchase for me, Middlesex Canal Shares at 330 Dollars a share, all assessments paid—or at 250 dollars with the last Assessment to pay—If...
An alternation of six Stages, and six Steam-Boats finally landed us here yesterday afternoon, being the very day upon which I had promised to be here. The President had arrived here on Wednesday, and occupies the official mansion, where I had an interview with him last Evening—But the walls are fresh plaistered, and the wainscoting is new painted; and they render it so insalubrious for present...
I cannot forbear to offer you my thanks for your kind and affectionate Letter of the day before yesterday, and to assure you how much I feel myself affected by the expression in it of that Sentiment of which as you remark, even friendship is inadequate to convey the idea. Next to brothers as we are by the ties of blood; brothers as we were by the habits and intimacies of childhood and of...
I have had the honour of receiving your letters of the 29th and 30th ulto. Copies of the commercial convention of 3 july 1815 and of the four articles proposed by lord Castlereagh to be added to it will be transmitted to you with this letter. The publication of Mr. de Neuville’s letter to the department and of my answer, with the documents transmitted by him, will be made in the course of two...
On the 22d. of September, the day upon which I entered on the Execution of the duties of my Office, I received your Letter of the 16th. which the pressure of business prevented me from answering immediately—Your mother however answered it for me, and now that I am enabled to catch a moment of leisure, I take advantage of it to write to you myself. Your remarks upon Mr Gilman’s discourses which...
Yesterday your kind Letter of 29 September came to hand I thank you for your Congratulations upon my arrival here—My Wife and our family relations at this place are well. I was happy to meet the President here, but had the pleasure of seeing him only once before he departed for his Seat in Virginia. I am breaking in to the business of my Office. I find it even now as burdensome as I had...
Will you have the goodness to order Mr. Micklain , the Tailor (who has my measure) to make for me two Broadcloth Coats, one black, and the other blue, with metal buttons, and both with internal side pockets, such as he has made for me before? Also two pair of best Broadcloth or double–milled blue Kersaymeer Pantaloons—Let the Package be given to Captain Forman , who returns to London in the...
I received a few days since from my father , the enclosed pamphlet, with directions, after availing myself of the opportunity of perusing it, to return it to you, to whose kindness he was indebted for the loan of it. I have found in it no material fact, with which I had not been before acquainted, unless it be the authentication by his own narrative of the author’s treachery to his Master; and...
My last letter to you was of the 8th inst. and acknowledged the receipt of all your letters that had then come to hand. Since which I have received your numbers 8. 11, 14 and 15 private and no. 8 public—with the huge volume of custom house laws—England’s Ægis (not major Cartwright’s) and the newspapers, Times and all, to the 6th of september inclusive; a bundle of Mr. Owen’s newspaper letter,...
Your kind Letter of 15th. October was received by me on the 20th. from which time, the only possible choice that has been left me with regard to my employments has been what necessary act of duty I should postpone for the sake of attending others still more urgent. On that day (the 20th.) the President returned to the City.—There is a routine of the ordinary department business of the...
The letter before the last that I wrote you was numbered one, as being the first after my arrival at this place—the last letter was numbered seven with reference to all that I have written you since I left London.—I shall continue this last numeration for the future as corresponding with yours, and at the same time manifesting a better return of punctuality on my part than the other. Since my...
Mr. Ogle Tayloe, son of colonel Tayloe one of the most respectable citizens of Virginia, and of this district, goes out as private secretary, and with the president’s approbation attached to the legation of mr. Rush. It is mr. Tayloe’s intention to give constant attendance at the office, and I am persuaded he will give you useful assistance in the transaction of business.—If he can be...
Your Letter of 14. October N. 2. but Post-marked on the Superscription, “Cambridge 21 Octr. was received by me on the 25th: of the same month—my engagements as you suppose absorb so much of my time, that I am seldom able to snatch a moment for writing private Letters to my family and friends. Yet I shall always endeavour to be as punctual a correspondent as possible, and shall particularly...
I have the Honour to acknowledge the Receipt of your several letters, with their respective enclosures, from No 1 to No. 10. inclusively. Mr. Rush, who takes charge of this Despatch, having been appointed Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of the United States in England, your office of Charge ‘d affairs will of course cease upon his presenting his letter of Credence to the...
I have received three Letters from you since I have been here, all grumbling Letters; and all very badly written—The first was of the 16th: the second of the 17th: of September, and the last of the 27th: of October—This last I disapprove of the most; and request you to write me no more such Letters—You conclude it by saying that you hope I will forgive any thing rash in my Son; but I shall do...
I have to answer two Letters from you—one of 28 October, and the other of 13. November—Tant va la Cruche à l’eau qu’à la fin elle se casse, was an old french proverb, long before Washington’s Mother was born. Tant va la Cruche a l’eau qu’à la fin elle s’emplit is the variation of Beaumarchais’s Basila in the Marriage of Figaro—But whether the pitcher is filled or whether it is broken it was...
I have the honour to transmit to you the enclosed Commission for the Sieur Sagrenet at the port of   in France , which the President has executed, leaving a blank for the name of the port, which he says you will be so good as to fill, as you are apprized of it, and it has escaped his recollection. Upon your doing this I have to request that you take the additional trouble of returning the...
Yours of the 24th. ulto. with the draft on the Branch Bank for 3000 Dollars in received.—Messrs: Payne and Co wrote me lately mentioning the opinion of our friend Mr. Jos: Stall Senior, that there would be no dividend upon the Canal Shares next January.—I immediately answered them that if that was now their own opinion, I wished them to suspend further purchases on my account.—I say the same...
A very few days after my arrival in this City, I received your Letter of 19. September, the contents of which I dare say you have before this time forgotten; unless you kept a copy of it, as you remember you used to do, of the Letters that you wrote to me from St. Petersburg, when I was at Ghent. This Letter of yours of 19. September last, I have kept upon my file, ever since I received it;...
In the Summer of 1816 I received under a cover from you, a Letter, addressed to Jeremy Bentham, of Queen Square Place, Westminster, a person then known to me only by reputation. I called at his house to deliver the Letter, but he was then absent in the Country, and I left the Letter to be forwarded to him. A few weeks afterwards a friend of his, who resides with him, a Mr Koe, came to my...
Your Letters of 21 and 26 Novr. and of the 8th: instant have been received—Of Mr Mason the bearer of the first, I have seen much less than I could have wished; and of Mr Barrell who brought the second a little more; for coming not only with your Recommendation, but with a volume of others all highly respectable, he pushed his importunity to such an excess, that I lost my temper with him, for...
The Bearer, Mr. N. Pope Delegate in Congress from the Territory of Illinois, and Brother of Mr. John Pope of Kentucky who is well known to you in making a visit to Boston, and I am happy to have the opportunity of introducing him to your acquaintance and of recommending him to your attentions—for which I pray you to be assured of the gratitude of your friend and faithful Servt. MHi : Adams...
Mr Nathl. Pope, the bearer of this Letter, is the Delegate in Congress from the Territory of Illinois, and Brother of Mr. John Pope of Kentucky who married my Wifes Sister Eliza.—I am happy to have the opportunity of introducing him to your acquaintance, and shall be grateful for every attentions which it may be in your power to bestow shew him on his tour to Boston I am with great Respect and...
I have but one moment of time to answer your Letter of the 2d: instant—and to direct you at the close of the Winter Vacation to offer yourself and pass examination for admission to the present Freshman Class; and, I hope you will assiduously employ the interval in preparing yourself for it. I cannot but acknowledge my surprize and mortification, to learn that you have been wasting your time...
I enclose you a Post-Note upon the Branch Bank of the United States at Boston, for Nine hundred and one dollars, and ninety–five Cents, being the amount of the dividend of five per Cent upon the debt proved under the Commission of Bankruptcy of Robert Bird and Co at New-York—I will thank you for a line acknowledging the receipt of this, and remain, Dear Sir / ever affectionately yours CSmH .
Abigail Smith Daughter of the Revd. Mr William Smith by Elizabeth his wife, was born November 11. 1744. Mary Smith Daughter of the Revd. Mr William Smith by Elizabeth his wife was born Decr. 9. 1741. William Smith, Son of the Revd. Mr William Smith by Elizabeth his wife was born Decr. 6. 1746. A purpose of Marriage between Mr Richard Cranch of Braintree and Mrs Mary Smith of Weymouth Dated...
Your new-years day Letter was received with much pleasure. I had heard something before, about your having had the Φ. Β. K. medal to wear for a week, and generally that Mr Gould was well satisfied with your attention to your studies, and with your good conduct; all which was very delightful to your mother and me—But it would have been still more agreeable if you had written that you continued...
I received with much pleasure you new year’s Letter, with the copy of the Lamp–lighter’s address, and the hint from the fount of the Centinal about a Present; which your uncle Thomas will tell you I have not forgotten. Your Parents were very highly gratified with what Mr Gould gave you leave to write to me concerning your promotion to the second Class, in which you will no doubt take care to...
Your N. 5. of 2. and 4. January has been duly received As I have but little time to think of my own affairs, I have every thing of mine in your hands, at your discretion—In the way of advice only, I think it best not to purchase Armstrong’s land—With Homer, and Spear, and all other tenants you must do as you think proper, and for the Rent of the house in which you dwell, fix it at your own...
I have received your Letters of 13 and 17 Jany, the Letter numbered 7. and enclosing your account to the close of the year—The other two Powers of Attorney, both of which I am obliged to return to you re infecta . Mr. Cutting’s Letter will explain to you the state of things with regard to the Land-Claims, and you must ascertain whether you can furnish the proof required As to the Stock, the...
You will find it most advisable to address your request for the appointment of a commissioner of bankrupts, if the law proposed should be adopted, directly to the president.— With such attestations of respectable persons, of known character, to your gratifications for the office, as you may be able to obtain.—I have found it necessary to establish it as a rule, to recommend for appointment no...
Your Letter of 5 Feby. has been received.—I shall attend to its contents as it regards Mr S. Codman, if the Bankrupt Law should pass—But I recommend no kinsman of mine for any thing—I think the proposed Bill for making national Justices of the Peace will not be adopted but if it should, and your name should be proposed as a Candidate there will be opposition—You know I presume that there is a...
Your Letter of the 19th: of Last Month, informing me of your admission to the University gave me great Satisfaction; and as you are now fully enrolled among the Sons of Harvard, I hope you will make it your constant and earnest object to do honour to that Institution, by the regularity of your conduct, and the steadiness of your pursuits You say that in the Class which you have entered,...
You have here enclosed, a draft on the United States Branch Bank at Boston to the order of Charles Newcomb, for 172 dollars 54 Cents, being the amount of dividends on the six and three per Cent Stocks due to him standing on the Books here, and for which I have signed receipts as his Attorney. The payment comes down to the second Quarter of 1816—inclusive—Upon the subject of the other...