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In answer to your letter of the 14th Instant, I inform you that the price of the land which I have in Gloucester County (Virginia) is Eight hundred pounds—estimating dollars at Six shillings—with interest thereon since the first day of April 1789 to the day on which I shall convey it: this being the precise cost of it to me. One fourth of the money to be paid at the time the Land is conveyed,...
Your favor of the 11th. came to hand three or four days ago. As my servant Bob went from here to place himself at Fredericksburgh, I took for granted he would fall in your way, and give you an account of Tarquin . Some time after his arrival here he was taken with a lameness which continued perhaps three or four weeks, not severe, but so as to render him unfit to be used. By leaving him at...
Your servant arrived here last night with the horse and he tells me he performed his journey well. The snow is so deep I cannot get from the house to the stable to see him; but I doubt not but he is well as the servant says and that he will answer my purpose at New York. At any rate you are no further responsible for him, nor have any thing else to do but to receive the £75. as soon as I can...
In some letter, or in some conversation, it runs in my head that you conveyed an intimation to me that if I should be disposed to part with Tarquin you would rather wish to possess him again. Purposing to return in the spring to Virginia to live, I have thought of selling him. He has been favorably treated, is in fine order and health, and with respect to his lameness is exactly as when you...
I have to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 4th inst. which announced to us the disagreeable intelligence of Mrs Plater’s death—Mrs Washington and myself sincerely condole with you, your Lady and the other friends of Mrs Plater upon this melancholy event. Mr Johnson has, as you supposed, declined the appointment of Judge to the District of Maryland, and I have lately appointed Mr...
Your bill for 250 dollars for the horse was yesterday presented by Messrs Ludlow & Gould and paid on sight. The President leaves this the 30th. I shall set out within a day or two after him, but am incertain whether I shall strike off from Alexandria by Newgate, or go by the way of Fredericksburgh . If the latter, I shall surely have the pleasure to call and ask you how you do. Mr. Madison and...
Your letter of the 26th of April was handed to me but a few days ago. Your congratulations and the good wishes of yourself, Mrs Fitzhugh & your family deserve, & receive my warmest acknowledgments. Amidst the numerous applications which are made for offices I shall leave no means in my power untried to gain such information & knowledge of Character & pretensions as will enable me to nominate...
The China Bowl with which your good father was so obliging as to present me came safe and I beg you to assure him that I shall esteem it more as a memento of his friendship than from its antiquity or size. Not before the receipt of your letter dated the 24th of last month, had I heard of the death of Mrs Fitzhugh. on this melancholy event I pray you to both to accept my sincere condolance. I...
[ New York, February 4, 1796. Hamilton endorsed a letter from FitzSimons dated December 17, 1795 : “Ansr. Feby. 4 179[6] agreeing & naming Mr. Lewis —Referees to decide as Judges in Chancellory Law & Fact.” Letter not found. ] FitzSimons, a native of Ireland, was a Philadelphia merchant. He was a Federalist member of the House of Representatives from 1789 to 1795. This is presumably a...
I return you Mr. Holkers papers with the result of the examination which has been made by my direction. As the thing at present appears to me I see no chance for Mr. Holker but in the final winding up of the arrangements concerning the public debt, when the existence or non existence of the certificates will be ascertained. Yrs. with great esteem & regard ALS , RG 217, Segregated Documents,...
[ New York ] November 27, 1789 . “With regard to feeling the public pulse about the debt I have several times had an inclination to the measure; but this inclination has given place to the reflection, that bringing on a discussion might be as likely to fix prejudices as to produce good, and that it may be safest to trust to the effect of the Legislative sanction to good measures, and to the...
I thank you very much, for the trouble you have been so obliging as to take, towards procuring a house for me. With regard to the one you mention it appears to have room & accommodations sufficient, and the rent is at about the standard I had contemplated. The advance would be no objection with me. I had wished for a Southern exposure; but one cannot have all one wishes. Will you have the...
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to Mr. Fitzsimmons, and returns Mr. Greene’s memorial, submitting some alterations to him. He takes for granted Mr. Greene will accompany it with the best vouchers the nature of every fact will admit, such as authentic copies of records where a matter of record is complained of &c. This will be necessary for us, that we may not commit ourselves in a...
The hurry of business has prevented my thanking you sooner for your letter of the 6th and the trouble you have been so obliging, as to take towards providing me with a house. I doubt not the one obtained will answer very well my purpose. Its proximity to my office is a great recommendation of it. Inclosed is an order on your bank of the Treasurer in favour of for four hundred dollars, for the...
[ New York, July 10, 1795. On July 14, 1795, FitzSimons wrote to Hamilton : “I ought to have answered your favor of the 10th sooner.” Letter not found. ]
Seeing the Debates on the subject of Democratic Societies I called at your house to state some facts. It is true that the opposition to the Excise laws began from causes foreign to Democratic societies, but it is well ascertained by proof in the course of Judiciary investigations that the insurrection immediately is to be essentially attributed to one of those Societies sometimes called the...
I happened to be out when Mrs. Jones did me the favor to call on me, but she left your letter, and as I do not know where to address to her I take the liberty of observing to you, that the Consuls of foreign powers residing with us, have no protection from the law of nations more than any other foreigners, they are open to the laws and tribunals of the country, may sue or be sued as other...
You were invited here at my request, in order that measures should be concerted with you, to impart such of the blessings of civilization, as may at present suit your condition, and give further desires to improve your own happiness. Colonel Pickering has made the particular arrangements with you, to carry into execution these objects, all of which I hereby approve and confirm. And in order...
Speech of the President of the United States, to the Chiefs and Representatives of the five nations of Indians, in Philadelphia. Sachems and Warriors of the Five Nations. It affords me great satisfaction, to see so many of you, who are the respectable Chiefs and Representatives of your several tribes, and I cordially bid you welcome to the Seat of the government of the United States. You have...
I recieved in Philadelphia your letter of June 8. but it was not in my power to answer it from thence, because all my papers and memorandums respecting my Law practice are here. I have now diligently examined these, and find that I was employed in May 1771. in the case of Leigh v. West, an action of debt on a bond removed by Habeas Corpus. None of my memorandum’s shew whether I was ever...
It was not till the 14th. of Octo: that I received your favor of the 1st. of that month, which I have communicated to the President on my arrival here, and I am sorry it is not in my power to say that your property taken on board an English ship by a French Privateer can be reclaimed by us. By the 14th. article of our Treaty with France we have established the principle that enemy vessels make...
Letter not found. Ca. 27 February 1795. Mentioned and enclosed in JM to William Madison, 1 Mar. 1795 . Asks Fontaine to explain to voters in Louisa County that JM is standing for reelection but cannot be present at the congressional election on 16 Mar. Mentions the illness of his wife and sister-in-law.
France receives favorably our Bread-stuff, Rice, wood, Pot and Pearl ashes. A duty of 5 Sous the Kental, or nearly 4½ Cents, is paid on our Tar, Pitch and Turpentine. Our whale Oils pay six livres the Kental, and are the only foreign whale oils admitted. Our Indigo pays 5 livres the Kental, their own two and a half. But a difference of quality, still more than a difference of duty prevents...
The House of Representatives having referred to me to Report to them, the nature and extent of the privileges and restrictions on the Commerce of the united States with foreign nations, I have accordingly prepared a Report on that subject. Being particularly anxious that it may be exact in matters of fact, I take the liberty of putting into your hands, privately and informally , an extract of...
The United Netherlands prohibit our pickled Beef and Pork, Meals and Bread of all sorts, and lay a prohibitory duty on Spirits distilled from Grain. All other of our productions are received on varied duties, which may be reckoned on a medium, at about 3 per cent. They consume but a small proportion of what they receive. The residue is partly forwarded for consumption in the inland parts of...
Great Britain receives our Pot and Pearl Ashes free, while those of other Nations pay a duty of 2s/3d the Kental. There is an equal distinction in favor of our Bar-iron; of which Article, however, we do not produce enough for our own use. Woods are free, from us, whilst they pay some small duty from other Countries. Indigo and Flaxseed are free, from all Countries. Our Tar and Pitch pay 11d....
Of our commercial objects, Spain receives favorably our Bread-stuff, salted Fish, wood, Ships, Tar, Pitch, and Turpentine. On our meals, however, when re-exported to their Colonies, they have lately imposed Duties, of from half a dollar to two dollars the Barrel, the Duties being so proportioned to the current price of their own Flour, as that both together are to make the constant sum of nine...
I do myself the honor of enclosing to you the determination of the President of the United States, as to the sailing of the vessels of War of any of the belligerent Nations from the United States. The rule being reasonable in itself, and conformable to the law of nations, is now transmitted to you, with a hope, that you will cause it to be promulgated among the Ships of War, whether public or...
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to [Mr. Genet] and being about to be absent from this city for a few weeks begs the favor of him to write his name on the outside of all letters he shall do him the honor to write to him before his return, that, being sent to his office, they may receive the particular attention for which he leaves instructions in order to shorten as much as possible the...
As in cases where vessels are reclaimed by the Subjects or Citizens of the belligerent powers as having been taken within the jurisdiction of the United States, it becomes necessary to ascertain that fact by testimony taken according to the laws of the United States, The Governors of the several States to whom the applications will be made in the first instance, are desired immediately to...