You
have
selected

  • Period

    • Washington Presidency

Author

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 10 / Top 50

Recipient

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 10 / Top 50

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Period="Washington Presidency"
Results 51-100 of 27,582 sorted by recipient
I went on Fryday night with M r Storer to the Drawing Room, where the Warmth of the Weather increased by a great fire and a Croud of good Company, gave me one of my annual great Colds. The Same Evening the large Lutheran Church in our old Neighbourhood took fire and was burnt down. The next morning M rs Otis was brought to bed and the Mother and the Daughter are very well. So much for News...
M rs. Washington presents her compliments to M rs. Adams— She wishes to know how the Vice-President and M rs. Adams are to day— M rs. Washington is happy to inform that the President is a little better to day than he was yesterday RC ( Adams Papers ); addressed: “M rs. Adams—” George Washington, unwell through much of the spring, became gravely ill from influenza and pneumonia in mid-May and...
Vive la Baggatelle! Dulce est desipere. I have no other Resource in my solitude, amidst all my gloomy forebodings of the future Miseries of my beloved Species. Our Allies, Our only Alies as the Demi-Crazies pathetically call them, have compleated their System by turning all their Churches into, Je ne seais quoi and if they should have any Government erected among them either by Themselves or...
Your favor of the 19 th instant I have received I thank you for your congratulations upon an event which has united me to the woman of my affections Your kind invitation shall be accepted as soon as I can leave my business for a few weeks how soon this may happen I cannot tell, nor can I flatter myself it can be in a short time. Since our marriage we have been at a house the Colonel has bought...
Cheesman has at length arrived and I have rec d my Trunk in much better order than I expected. The People here are much cooler than they were last Week. The Embargo begins to be felt by many who have been the most noisy and turbulent. Speculation mingles itself in every political Operation and many Merchants have already made a noble Spec. of the Embargo by raising their Prices: but the...
I have taken a Sheet of Paper, only to wish you an happy new Year and many happy repetitions of this Aniversary. I received yesterday a Letter, and Pacquet of his Liberty Papers and Pamphlets from M r B. Hollis dated 18. Feb. 1793. Where it has been I cannot guess. He Sends his best Wishes to you and hopes you have recovered your health and Spirits. I Suppose Columbus has now done with G— I...
I rec d this morning your kind Letter of the 7 th. and wonder you had not rec d a Letter. I wrote from Stratford & Newyork and twice a Week since I have been here. your Anxiety for your Country is amiable and becomes your Character. Elevated Expectations of Grandeur and Glory as well as Prosperity have accompanied me through Life and been a great source of my Enjoyment. They are not diminished...
M r Dalton, M r Jenkes and myself are at Penfields in good health and Spirits.— My Horses perform very well and my Servant tolerably. We have met with nothing but Rocks in the Road to molest us. These have jolted us very rudely but Salubriously. I shall keep M r Dalton company to Boston at least to Cambridge. according to present Conjectures We shall Spend the Sabbath at Springfield. My Love...
The Newspapers will inform you of our interminable Delays. The House have asked for Papers and the President has refused them, with Reasons and the House are about to record in their Journals their Reasons— meanwhile the Business is in suspence: and I have no clear Prospect when I shall go home. It is the general opinion of those I converse with that after they have passed the Resolutions...
Our Antifœderal Scribblers are so fond of Rotations that they Seem disposed to remove their Abuses from me to the President. Baches Paper which is nearly as bad as Freneaux’s begins to join in concert with it, to maul the President for his Drawing Rooms, Levees, declining to accept of Invitations to Dinners and Tea Parties, his Birth day Odes, Visits, Compliments &c— I may be expected to be an...
I this day rec d your favours of the 8. and 12 th. but how this last could have leaped to this distance in five days I know not. It is impossible to Say precisely when Congress will rise: but I will go home as soon as possible; I hope in April. I am very willing to confide all Arrangements to you— I like shaw and his Wife: and I like Richards and Joy from your Account of them.— We will try a...
It is now determined what the President has to depend on after the 4 th March. The Committee determined against raising the Salary of P. or V. P. The House which the P. had for 500 £ cannot again be had under 1000 £ — Horses are from 3 times to five times as high as they were Seven Years ago, Carriages three times as high—Provisions &c In Short all Levees and Drawing Rooms and Dinners must be...
I have rec d your favour of Nov. 23.— M r Cooper The Friend of our Diplomatic at the Hague, I hear was very active in the Election of M r Ames.— I wish that both Parties and all Parties may be convinced that Some Qualification of Voters is necessary; but if Negroes & Sailors and Tapsters all unqualified by Law as Oliver Cromwell used to call them are to vote for one why not for another.? You...
I have received your favor of the 21 st: and as I want a little private conversation with you, must oblige you to pay the Postage of my answer. At the request of several of our Friends I addressed a Letter to my Father a day or two since—stating certain reasons for hastening his Journey to Philad a: and most of those were of a public nature; but I omitted to mention any inducements of a...
The Weather here is as fine as it was the last Year. The Festival season of Christmas and the new Year, is enjoyed in Perfection by all, for what I know, but poor Cabot and me. He is as solitary and disconsolate as a lone Goose. He strives to keep up his Spirits and preserve his usual Gaiety but one plainly perceives it is all Exertion. There are Letters to the secretary of State upon public...
I have the receipt of two Letters from you to acknowledge; the one bearing date September 15. and the other October 8. of the year which has just been added to the rolls of departed Time. For both these Letters please to accept my cordial thanks. As the principal subject of them relates to the Treaty, which brought me here, they are not susceptible of a lengthy answer from me.— The part which...
My books arrived in good order and well conditioned the day after I last wrote to my father. By some mistake the 28 th volume of The Dictionaire Diplomatique was left behind. Though I have not seen an account of the departure of my brothers I suppose from my father’s last letter that e’er this they must have sailed One half of your children are called away from you and though seas do not...
We have been already ten days in this place, but there has been no opportunity to Boston since our arrival. And altho’ I have done but very little, yet I have been so perpetually busy, that I have scarce found time even to write to the Secretary of State, and to my Father. My Brother I presume has informed you, how pleasant our passage was in every respect, excepting the conveyance, & how very...
I thank you for your kind Letter inclosing that from our Friend Hollis. The Influenza is here as general as it was at N. York.— Your youngest Son has been laid up with it at M r Cranche’s; but is better. M r Wibird is confined with it, so that We had no Meeting. I have been to visit him: He is not very bad: but not fit to go out. My great Horse, had a Misfortune last night in the Stable, that...
My last letter to you was dated the 27 th: of August, and went by “the Gen l Green” for Rhode Island. I hope ere this it has made more than half the passage. A direct opportunity offers for Boston from Rotterdam and another from the Capital, by the latter of which, I am informed, in a letter from Mess rs: Willink just received, will be sent the table linnen & ca: which was ordered by you last...
I received yesterday two Letters from each of our Sons at the Hague, who were very well and in good Spirits on the 25 th of April: but the Letters contain So much Information, that I have been obliged to lend them to The Secretary of the Treasury: I shall inclose them to you however on Monday All the next Week will be taken up, I Suppose in further Investigations of the Subject before Senate,...
I dined on Monday at the Presidents with young La Fayette and his Preceptor, Tutor or Friend, whatever they call him, whose Name is Frestel. I asked Them with M r Lear to breakfast with me this Morning and they agreed to come: but last Evening M r Lear came with a Message from The President, to ask my Opinion whether it would be adviseable for the young Gentleman, in the present Circumstances...
I dined Yesterday with M r Madison. M rs Madison is a fine Woman and her two sisters are equally so: one of them is married to George Washington one of the two Nephews of the President who were sometimes at our House. M r Washington came and civilly enquired after your Health. These Ladies, whose Names were Pain, are of a Quaker Family once of North Carolina. The Treaty with Spain is arrived...
It was my intention to have written to you earlier after my return than this, but have found my time very much taken up, with puting my house in order.— You will not however think me less sincere for being late in my enquieres after your health, which I am sorry to hear is not yet confirmed. Your friends here regret very much, being deprived of your society this winter and are only reconciled...
Brisler has shipped, on board The Abby Captain Eames, two Barrells of Flour, one hundred Weight of Clover Seed and half a Bushell of Herds Grass Seeds; and the Medallion: all consigned to our Friend M r Smith in Boston. As Captain Eames’s Intention was to Sail to day, I Suppose he is gone. twelve Pounds of Clover seed and two quarts at least of Herds grass seeds must be sown, when the time...
Having been honored with the Vice Presidents consent to attend the Eulogium in Memory of D r Benjamin Franklin. We in the name of the Philosophical Society, presume to hope you will do them the honor of your presence on the Same important occasion We have the honor to be / with the greatest respect / Madam / Your obedient Servants RC ( Adams Papers ); internal address: “M rs Adams.—” Benjamin...
The Alteration of Post Days or some other Cause has disappointed me of a Letter from you this Week, which is the first time I have failled of a Letter on Monday for several months. The Weather has been very hot and dry here. Yesterday however We had a Light shower: but to day it is very hot again. The House is slow upon the Ways and means the essential Measure which remains— But I think We...
I have this morning rec d your kind Letters of 10 & 11 th. of May.— You mention Land bought by D r Phipps which you had mentioned to me: but I have not rec d any Letter from you which hinted at any Land— By this I fear I lost a Letter last monday by some fault in the Post.— however I want no more land at present. A Pew I should like to have, and a double one too if possible.— I shall leave you...
Four precious letters from you have come to the hand of your apostate Son Thomas, without any other acknowledgment on his part, than silent gratitude. Such a return neither merits, nor I fear will it receive a repetition of your favors. The dates of those received are the 17. & 18. September 30 November and 12 March. I shall reply to them in their order so far as respects the several...
This is the coldest day We have felt this Winter, and if it were not for the hope I have of a Letter from you Tomorrow, I should freeze for what I know, to night. This Month has been all unpleasant Weather but none severe. You have had a North East storm I perceive which raised the Tides And I hope brought in a fresh and abundant supply of Seaweed.— It is the dullest time We have seen this...
There is a dead calm in the political Atmosphere, which furnishes no Event worth relating. The House of Reps is wholly taken up with two worthless Agents of Corruption. I have this day however heard News that is of some Importance. It must be kept a Secret wholly to yourself, One of the Ministry told me to day that the President was solemnly determined to serve no longer than the End of his...
I rec d yours of the 14 on Fryday: but had no Letter on Monday. According to present appearances, Jefferson will be Daddy Vice, and between you and me I expect you will soon See a more ample Provision made for him, that he may live in Style—and not be obliged to lodge at Taverns and ride in Stage Coaches. I See plainly enough that when your Washingtons and Adams’s are Stowed away our dear...
It is indeed several weeks since I have written to you—an eventful term to me—multiplied with cares, which have prevented me from presenting my most cordial Thanks to my dear Sisters, for their kindness, & the maternal affection they have shewn my Daughter— I think I Justly estimated her genius & temper—& my expectations were raised, that, when under your fostering hand she would greatly...
We arrived here last night in good Season. The Roads were not very bad, and the Weather, tho Showery, was not inconvenient. M r Freeman the Son of our late Neighbours at Milton and a M r Thorp of New York were our Companions in the Stage. M r Freeman is a very agreable Man. I never travelled with any Man more assiduous to make me comfortable. At Church I met my Old Friends Governor Huntington...
This morning I received your favour of the 20 th. The House I am in was aired and Smoked with Tar & Powder and the Vaults Slaked with Lime &c before I came in. I hope with you that Congress will not remain here late in the Spring: but the Extent of Business before Us Seems to be immense. Perhaps the less We do the better. Something however must be done. When Russell Said “there is but one Man...
The H. of R. have not yet determined— The Question is to be calld up on Monday— But the opposition who now call themselves the virtuous Majority, will endeavour Still to postpone it. It is now avowed by M r Bond, the British Chargé D’affaires that the Surrender of the Posts is suspended upon the determination of the H. of R. and who could expect it would be otherwise? I have read “The...
The Senate is to meet at Ten, this morning and I hope will finish: but it is still uncertain. I shall Sett out this Afternoon, provided the senate rises— But I shall not be able to reach New York by tomorrow night— if I am not restrained from riding on sunday I may arrive on that day: But on Sunday or Monday I think, barring accidents, you may expect me. I have been detained so long, the hot...
I must now most Seriously request you to come on to me as soon as conveniently you can. never did I want your assistance more than at present, as my Physician and my Nurse. my disorder of Eight years standing has encreased to such a degree as to be very troublesome and not a little alarming.— I have agreed to take Col Smith and his Family and Furniture into the House with us and they will be...
I am somewhat surprized by the information given in your letter of the 23 d: Dec r: viz. that you have not received a single line from me since my Father left you. Certainly there must have been some fault in the Post Office, or some person who has taken the letters therefrom has neglected to deliver them. I wrote the first week after my Fathers arrival, informing you of several circumstances...
Mr Cranch has pack’d your things & sent them on Board Captain Barnard I hope they will go safe but since they were put on Board mr woodward has sent for the stone roler & says he lent it to mr Adams, that mr Borland sold it to him we sent him to the Doctor about it. If tis so I suppose it will be taken out—I told him you certainly suppos’d it purchase’d with the House or you would not have...
I am quite ashamed my dear M rs Adams that I have so long neglected writeing to you, indeed I can make but a very poor excuse for so doing, & must depend wholly on your candor to excuse my neglegence. You wish to know how your acquaintance are, M rs Washington enjoys as much health as can be expected at her time of life, and her spirits are better than I expected to find them. M rs Powell, I...
Our good Friend General Lincoln gave me this morning your favour of the 7 th which compensated in Part of my Disappointment by Mondays Post. I sett my heart on one Letter a Week and as many more as you please. I cannot say that my desire of Fame increases. It has been Strong in some Parts of my Life but never so strong as my Love of honesty. I never in my Life that I know of sacrificed my...
Last Week I received through M r Izard a kind Invitation to dine with M rs Powell, whom I had not before seen Since her Loss of M r Powell. Yesterday I had the Pleasure of dining with her and her Brother & sister Francis with their Children and M r & M rs Harrison among the rest—M r & M rs Morris & M r Izard— M rs Powell sends many Compliments to you and regrets that she cannot enjoy your...
I hope you will not communicate to any body the hints I give you about our Prospects: but they appear every day worse and worse. House Rent at 2700 dollars a Year 1500 dollars for a Carriage 1000 for one Pair of Horses— All the Glasses ornaments kitchen furniture—the best Chairs settees, Plateaus &c all to purchase—All the China Delph or Wedgwood Glass & Crockery of every sort to purchase—and...
Entre nous M r sheerjashub Bourne called upon me the other Morning to ask me some Questions about M r Blacks farm and Capt n. Beale’s farm. He says both are to be sold— Beale asks ten thousand Dollars for his New House and farm—and the same for Squantm— M r Blacks asks Eighteen thousand but it is Supposed would take fifteen. I hope in mercy Bourn will not buy— Our present Neighbours are I...
The Commission with which you charged me for the Mess rs Willink has been executed so far as depends upon me. The Gentlemen have promised to embrace the first opportunity that offers for Boston, to forward the things to you. I thought that they were too large to be sent with convenience form New York, for which port only, were there any vessels to sail immediately from Amsterdam. The...
I received with great pleasure, my dear Mamma, your favour of the 7 th: inst t: which relieved me in some measure from my anxiety on account of your health, though it is now again alarmed at having no letters this evening by the Post. I want exceedingly to hear of your arrival at Philadelphia, and of the thorough restoration of your health.— I hope nothing will induce you to spend another...
Major Mc Farling has just called upon us, & informed us of his intention of going to Philadephia this Week—& has intimated a wish, that some outlines of his general Character might be given to the Vice President— Mr Shaw is called away on some business, & supposes, that if it is done in the female line, it may be as efficacious as if he had written himself— Major Mc-Farling had some...
I should have been very happy to have seen you yesterday.— and am truly sorry the bad day disapointd me of the plasure, your servant brought you kind favor yesterday while I was at dinner. he could not stay and the evening was so bad,— I have the plasure to ask you, how your self M rs Smith Miss Smith and the little ones are to day, I intended yesterday after the sermon to bring the children...
This day I rec d yours of the 2 d. — I have rec d all the Votes from all the States. it is known that Georgia voted with N.C. V. and N.Y. and Kentucky voted for Jefferson. There is no other Newspaper circulated in the back Country of the Southern States than Freneau’s National Gazette, which is employed with great Industry to poison the Minds of the People. The Fœderal Court has again had a...