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When any vessel, whether of war or merchandize, public or private, belonging to any belligerent nation, shall depart from the United States, beyond the jurisdictional line of the United States, on the Ocean; and a vessel of war whether public or private, belonging to another of the belligerent nations, being adverse, shall at the time of the departure of the first mentioned vessel, be within...
There has been a meeting in this town, for the unmeaning purpose of attempting to shake your opinion, on the subject of our late negociation. I deem it not improper to notice, that the men appointed, as actors, to shape the resolutions, are composed of that order in society, who are Confessedly unqualified, for want of information, to examine the subject on which they judged with such hasty...
I have to acknowledge the receipt of your letters of the 18th. and 28th. instant as agents for the state of North Carolina. Altho the laws relative to the payment of the invalid pensioners fully authorize the payment of the money to those individuals, I do not consider them as warranting a payment to the State of North Carolina whose Executive appears to have discharged a part of the demands...
I have been favored with your letter from New York, [and I] am very thankful for your care of the letters from Mr. Pinckney and particularly so also for your attention to the threshing machine, which, if it answers what I have heard of it will be a vast acquisition to the states of Virginia and North Carolina. If you should not be coming on yourself to Philadelphia in the course of the present...
I have recd your letter of the 31st ulto from New York enclosing one from Sr Edwd Newinham—also the magazines, the Packet from Sr John Sinclair &c. for your care And attention in forwarding them I beg you to accept my thanks. Any civilities which it may be in my power to shew you while you remain in this Country, will give me Pleasure. I am Sir your Mot obt Sert LB , DLC:GW ; copy, DNA : RG...
I am not surprized at your Anxiety expressed in your Letter of the 25 th. which I rec d Yesterday. The Conduct of certain Mules has been so gloomy and obstinate for five Months past as to threaten the most dangerous Effects. The Proceedings of Boston N. York & Philadelphia now compared with their intemperate folly last July or August is a curious Specimen of Negotians with foreign Courts &...
I have all along flattered myself with hopes that I might with Propriety have taken Leave of the Senate and returned home, as soon as the Roads might be settled: But such is the critical State of our public Affairs, and I daily hear Such Doctrines Advanced, and Supported by almost and sometimes quite one half of the Senate, that I shall not prevail on myself to abandon my Post. This Day the...
This Morning I received your favour of the 21 st. of January. I am Sure your People do a great deal of Work, So dont be concern’d— I am very well Satisfied with your Agricultural Diary. The venerable Governor made the best Speech he ever made—but the old Leaven ferments a little in it.— I wonder you had not rec d two Letters from Thomas which I inclosed to you. I now inclose you one from M r...
The Judges are now here— Judge Cushing is under the Hands of D r Tate who is Said to have wrought many Cures of Cancers and particularly one for the President. The Judge appears to be under serious apprehensions for something in his Lip which he thinks is a Cancer but his hopes from Tates Prescriptions seem to be lively. M rs Washington is happy in the Company of her three Grand daughters, the...
Your frindly letter of the 29 th of June —I should not have suffered to remain so long unacknowledge from any other cause than that of the severe illness of my dear Little Washington—who was confined to his bed with a cruel fevor for three weeks in the Months of July & August— I beleive it is heardly necessary my dear madam for me to tell you that, during the time of his illness I was not in a...
I have this moment rec d your favour of 25. April.— If you want more Money before June borrow it of the General whom I will repay when I return. The freight of the furniture was in Mass. L. M.— The Farm goes on admirably well— I am well Satisfied with all you do. The Weather is terribly hot and dry for the season. Yet the Country looks charmingly. I hope to be at home by the first of June....
The Senate are now in Possession of the Budget.— It is a Bone to gnaw for The Aristocrats as well as the Democrats: And while I am employed in attending the Digestion of it, I send you enclosed an Amusement which resembles it only in name. I can form no Judgment when the Proscess will be over. We must wait with Patience. I dined yesterday in the Family Way with The President— He told me that...
Your favour of January 23 d. by Captain Barnard reached me two or three days ago. I am a little surprized that you had not at that date received any letters from me later than July. But indeed the intercourse between America and Holland is so precarious and interrupted that it is scarcely possible that a letter should pass from the one to the other in a shorter time than four or five months....
Encouraged Madam, by your condescention in answering a letter I not long since took the liberty to write you, And relying on your candour to pardon my forwardness, I again take up the pen tho’ not without fear that you will deem me an intruder on your time & patience; In your answer to the letter I have reference to, you gave me all the information I cou’d desire, & I felt myself honor’d that...
I should be unpardonable if I neglected this Opportunity of writing to you by a private hand, & returning my grateful acknowledgements to my dear Brother Adams & you, for all your kindness—but alas! how inadequate are words to express the feelings of my heart. Upon those occasions I think it my duty to trace mercy’s to there great Source, & look up to heaven with thankfulness that I, & my...
The Mail of Yesterday brought me, a rich Treasure in your kind Letters of the 18. 24 and 25 th of January— Ice in the Rivers or Snow or some other Obstructions on the Roads have delay’d the Conveyance of some of them and occasioned their Arrival all together. Columbus and Barneveld were both written with Elegance and Spirit and the poor Wretches who so justly fell under their Lashes were never...
You Say you have no desire to be the first, and I cannot say that it is desirable: but according to all present appearances you will either be the first or among the last in another thirteen months. I would not distress myself to obtain the Priviledge of carrying an heavier Load than any of my fellow Labourers: but if the Fates destine one to attempt it it would be dastardly to Shrink if it...
Your kind letter should not have lain so long unanswered had I not impatiently waited for the event so much wished by me, an event which to myself and Family gives great pleasure, and I beg leave to congratulate you with the greatest Sincerity I am happy to find the Country have not forgot to be grateful to so good a Man, and firm Friend. I have no doubts but the place of our Worthy and great...
It is monday, the Time to expect the Eastern mail other Men have Letters— I have none— humiliated and mortified and at the Same time irritated, I feel sometimes a disposition to abuse the Post offices, sometimes to make a rash Vow never to Spend another Winter seperated from my Small Family that remains to me, but never once harbour a Suspicion that Madam may have omitted to write. Upon the...
I rec d , Yesterday by the Post, the inclosed Letter, which excites a hope of more by the Same Ship. There is a curious Mass of matter in fermentation at this Time. The French and Spaniards are as injurious as ever the English have been. Washington retires and his Sucessor will have but a majority of three Votes at most. and as if, it were to irritate every feeling nerve a Land Tax must be...
After a very fatiguing and a very anxious jaunt, I have returned from Albany with my Certificate of admittance to pratice the law I suffered much anxiety from the hesitation which the Court made at the certificate given me by M r Lawrance who had not exactly pursued the form which is required in such cases. The great stumbling block was that he had expressed That “I entered his office” at a...
I received a few days ago your favour of Feb y: 29. which was doubly grateful to me, as it was the first letter I had received from America, for many weeks.— Since then I have also received a letter from Philadelphia, which determines my immediate return to the Hague, from whence I hope that the next letter I shall write you will be dated. You will find in the papers enclosed all the news that...
I am so anxious for your health, Since you inform’d me of the return of your Intermittent, that I shall take the Stage on Monday for N. York, but whether I shall go by the Packet to Providence, or continue in the Stage to Boston, I know not. This will depend upon the Wind and other Circumstances to be learn’d at N. York. C. Smith is here in good health. He is returned from France and England,...
I was not disappointed Yesterday, for the Post brought me your Letter of January. and I was relieved from an heavy Burthen of anxiety On Account of Nabby by a Letter from Charles assuring me that she was much better and thought to be out of Danger. Your Gratitude for the kind Protection of Providence to your Family is as natural as it is pious. Few Families have oftener been at hazard, and...
My old Acquaintance M r Walton, who Served in Congress, with me in 1776 and 1777 is returned a Senator from Georgia in the room of General Jackson who has resigned. He is or has lately been Chief Justice. As old Acquaintances are easily Sociable We soon fell into Conversation about Affairs old and new. I asked him whether The Negative of M r Rutledge would have any ill Effects at the...
I have rec d your Letter of the cold Sunday on which I wrote you one from Stratford. In N. York Charles gave me the original Letter, the Duplicate of which you transmitted me. I communicated it to the P. with five preceeding Numbers. After reading them The P. was pleased to say that “M r Adams’s Intelligence was very good, and his Penetration and foresight very great. At least Things appeared...
I wrote you last Sunday by Doctor Welsh & your son who were here & sent it to new-york where you now are I suppose. I hope you found the Letter when you arriv’d as your Sympathytick heart would be in some measure reliev’d by the favourable account I gave you of mr Cranchs Leg— since that time it has continu’d to descharge well the mortified parts have been seperateing from the sound flesh &...
M r Adams (your son) presented me with your obliging favor of June the 20 th. and I pray you to accept my thanks for your kind remembrance of me; and the assurance of the pleasure I felt at hearing that you had quite recovered your health again.— That parental feelings should be put to the test at a seperation (perhaps for years) from a dutyful, and meritorious son, is not to be wondered at;...
I am quite discourag’d writing by the Post I know not if you have ever receiv’d one Letter Which I have sent by them I have sent two long ones the Last I put into the office a month ago last Saturday. I should have written oftener if I had not suspected that Letters directed to Mr Adams where taken out by somebody who had no right to them— I hope I am mistaken—but I cannot conceive why you...
If I could take a Walk or a Ride to N. Y. in the Evening and come here again in the Morning how clever it would be!— I am Somewhat disappointed in not having rec d a Line from you Since I left you—You are not sick I hope— M r Jay Spent last Evening with me and let me into the History of the Treaty and Negotiation, explaining his Views of its intent and operation— I can Say nothing upon it at...
This Morning I returned M r Genets’ Visit. The Conversation was confined to Some Inquiries I made concerning his Mother, and Sisters with whom I was acquainted at Versailles in 1778. 1779. and 1780, and some little discussion about the form of the new Constitution: but not one Word or hint or Allusion concerning himself his Conduct, or the Conduct of our Government or People towards him. I...
I have rec d yours of the 5 th. — If you think it best, leave Thomas at Colledge: but I pray you to come on with Charles, as soon as possible.— as to the Place let my Brother plough and plant if he will, as much as he will. He may Send me, my half of the Butter Cheese &c here.— As to Money to bear your Expences you must if you can borrow of some Friend enough to bring you here. if you cannot...
inclosed is a Letter from Capt n. Brown who commands the best Packet between Providence and this Place.— He called very politely and respectfully to offer his service in bringing you to New York.— if you can let him know the time when you can come, he will be ready. I have taken an House: but have nothing to put in it, [no]r to live on.— nothing is yet determined, I never felt so [ir]resolute...
Your fav r of 24 th marked by the Post office 22 d of Dec r. I rec d. Yesterday. M r Osgoods sermon was plenty here— I rec d one from Boston before.— The Clergy I think ought to pray for the national Government.— If our Dissenting Ministers will not at Quincy I will go to Church, where a form is prescribed by Authority which even M r Cleverly complies with. Within a Day or two after your last...
A few days ago, I received a Letter from my father dated at Quincy the 28 th: of October, and brought by a vessel directly from Boston. But there came with it, none from you either to my brother or to me, and my father does not mention the state of your health, so that we are much concerned about it, particularly as a Letter from M r: Cranch at Washington, written in September mentions by...
We go on as Usual—Congress resolving one Thing and the Democratical societies resolving the Contrary.— The President doing what is right and Clubbs and Mobs resolving it to be all wrong. We had in senate a few Days ago the greatest Curiosity of all. The Senators from Virginia moved, in Consequence of an Instruction from their Constituents, that the Execution of the 4 th. Article of the Treaty...
Your Letter from your Sick Chamber if not from your Sick bed, has made me so uneasy that I must get away as soon as possible.— Monday Morning at Six, I am to Sett off in the Stage, but how many days it will take to get home will depend on the Roads, and or the Winds. I dont believe Nabby will go with me. Her Adventurer of an Husband is so proud of his Wealth that he would not let her go I...
I know your tender sympathetick Heart will join with me, & drop a Tear over a lovely Child—the once beautiful John Adams Thaxter—sick—faded—withered—dead— Just as his dawning reason made us wish his stay— Just as his beauteous smile & sparkling Eye promised future Joy— It is this consideration alone that can calm the tumult of the Soul, & give peace, & serenity to the weepings Eyes, &...
I have neglected writing to you longer than usual, that I might have it in my power to give you some more favorable prospect of publick affairs, than for some time past has presented itself to my mind; I have had some serious thoughts of the alteration of my pospects, in the event of a war. Instead of peaceably pursuing the path of my profession; the law of Arms would probably excite my...
The arrival of the french Army in this Country, as the friends and allies of the Batavian People, and the Revolution, which has abolished the Stadholdership, the nobility, the former States of the Provinces, and the Regencies of the Cities, will undoubtedly be a subject of considerable attention in our Country; perhaps it may give occasion to many groundless rumours and reports, and possibly...
I wrote you this morning inclosing a Post note for 600 and went to Senate with full Expectation of receiving a Letter from you. The Door Keeper had the Letters for others but none for me— What a Disappointment! I went mourning and moaping about for Some time, grumbling at my Stars and almost blaming my best Friend: but it was not long before the Letter of the 15 was brought me from the...
I have just rec d from the P. Office your Letter of the 20 th. by Brisler who went to carry one for you— I write by every Post i.e by Mondays and Thursdays which are the only ones on which Mails are made up for any Place beyond N. York, and the only ones on which Letters arrive here from any Place beyond that City. M rs Adams your new Daughter behaves prettily in her new Sphere— I dined with...
I have this morning yours of the 9 th. Am glad you have mine from Stratford: you will receive others in Succession. I am not much chagrined at the disappointment of ploughing the Hill. The Spring will do. The more Seaweed is procured the better. I need not exhort you to get Wood. I am Glad M r Bass is provided for. I wish you to expend as little as possible in Labour except for Seaweed and...
I received last Evening your Letter of the 3 d inst— I began to think you had almost forgotten me. now and then I hear from you by persons who have seen you— they tell me that you appear to enjoy your health the weather grows so severe that I am almost discourage from thinking of quiting my own fire side. M r Smith does not find it convenient at present to Leave his official and private...
Your Favor of July 14 th: I duely received, and feel myself not a little flattered by your kind remembrance, and shall be ever highly gratified in retaining the friendship which flows from so good and benvolent an heart as you possess: as in this state we have very often occation to lament the seperation from those we esteem: so we have had much reason to regret the loss of yourself, and...
Mrs Washington, presents her compliments to M rs Adams,— if it is agreable to her, to Let miss smith come to dance with nelly & Washington, the master attends mondays wednesdays and Frydays at five oclock in the evenings— M rs Washington will be very happy to see miss smith RC (private owner; photocopy at ViMtvL ); addressed: “M rs Adams”; docketed: “Mrs Washington / to Mrs Adams.” Martha...
M rs Otis arrived with her little Rosignal, in good health and Spirits the night before last, and brought me your favour of Dec r 7.— Why am not I so fortunate as to be able to receive my best Friend, and to Spend my Days with her whose Society is the principal delight of my Life. If I could make Twelve Thousand dollars at a Bargain and Several of Such Bargains in a Year: but Silence.— So it...
on Wednesday I dined with M r Russell the Friend of D r Priestley and while We were at Table, in came large Packets of Letters and Newspapers from England. The Ladies at Table had Letters from their friends and the Scæne was so lively so much like what I had often felt that it put me into very good humour. The News was what you will see in Fennos Paper. Yesterday I dined at the Presidents with...
The opportunities for writing occur so frequently at this time, and there is so little to say that I am apprehensive some of them will escape without carrying any letters to you; for one is ashamed to write a short letter; when it is to go so far; and like most correspondents I do not always remember that to write little is better than not to write at all. I send you by the present opportunity...
It Can be of little Consequence to you my dear Madam wither Your late adventure with me amounts to 8000 dollars or only 8 /— Yet it is my duty to let you know how it stands and to take your commands either to vest You again as an adventurer in the next Class—or remit to your order the sum of 8/4— as I think it always best to rise in our subject instead of sinking from great to small things—my...