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We had the pleasure of waiting on you in May & in Octr. As Pr: informing you by the latter of your good luck of your number 995. of the Obligato. of 4 per Ct. whch. had a price drawn of ƒ1000: —one thousand Guilds. among those drawn Last Year conform the agreemt. whch Should be at your disposal by Sending us a Receipt for the Same. tho’ we Continue Without any of your esteemed favors, we...
The more the subject is considered, the sooner all men will be convinced, that human passions are all insatiable; that, instead of being extinguished, moderated, or contented, they always strengthen by indulgence and gratification; and therefore, that the only security against them is in checks, whether in civil or ecclesiastical societies. This is no more true with regard to the love of...
An appointment from the State of Georgia as one of their representatives in congress lays me under the necessity of resigning my seat at the general board of commissioners for finally adjusting all accounts between the United States and the individual States. With the greatest possible respect I have the honour to be your most devoted humble Servant ALS , DNA:PCC , item 78. Abraham Baldwin...
Urged by the all powerful impulse of necesaty I presume to appear before your Excellency as an humble Solicitor for employment in the service of the United States In the late War from its commencement until the conclusion thereof I had the honor to serve as Deputy Quarter Master General and to receive that testimonial of my conduct therein from the late General Green which I take the liberty...
If you are not already fatigued with the Numerous similar Applications that have already been made, I will with Permission make known to you it is my wish to be continued Naval Officer of Norfolk. for circumstances, I refur you to Col. Parker, who was present at my Appointment. having served in the Army—the Executive thought my pretentions equal to any that offer’d. Should you think that my...
Having had the honor of being annually appointed Collector of the Port of Savannah for two years by a very respectable majority of the Legislature of the State of Georgia— my desire of continuing in that situation induces me to trouble you on the subject of my reappointment; this trouble has been rendered necessary in as much as the Constitution of the United States has taken that power out of...
In the fragments of the discarded inaugural address , printed below , page numbers without brackets appear on the fragment; those page numbers enclosed in brackets are conjectural. [1] We are this day assembled on a solemn and important occasion—[owned (1974) by Mr. Nathaniel E. Stein, New York] [1–3] not as a ceremony without meaning, but with a single reference to our dependence [recto,...
Among the vicissitudes incident to life, no event could have filled me with greater anxieties than that of which the notification was transmitted by your order, and received on the fourteenth day of the present month. On the one hand, I was summoned by my Country, whose voice I can never hear but with veneration and love, from a retreat which I had chosen with the fondest predilection, and, in...
The term had not yet been coined, but JM was ghostwriting speeches for Washington during the earliest stages of the first president’s tenure. Until Washington’s official family had been established by law and the offices filled, JM was the president’s confidential adviser. In his first dealings with Congress, Washington relied on him to give substance and tone to commonly held ideas on...
Pardonnez, Monsieur, Si je n’ai pas répondu plutot à la lettre que vous m’avez fait l’honneur de m’écrire; mais n’ayant pas été à l’Académie, samedy dernier, je ne Savois pas si les propositions de M. Rumsay y avoient été renvoyées par M. De Villedeuil. J’y ai été hier, et J’ai trouvé sur le régistre du sécrétaire qu’en effet ces propositions y avoient été envoyées, et que J’avois été nommé un...
I have now the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your favor of the 14th. inst. I am in hopes Mr. Paradise will be persuaded to remain here till the deed comes, tho’ it will be with difficulty. I have not yet received my permission to go to America: but I expect it daily. However I may very likely be not gone the middle of May, and consequently may receive my books from Pinetti’s sale before...
At the time you embark’d from America for Europe, on board the Boston Frigate Samuel Tucker Esquire Commander; I had the honour to be A Naval Lieutenant. Advanced in Life—steady in the public service—together with my Children, at present I find myself Embarrased with a large Family, and if my Conduct during your Excellencys observation of it, Was such as to induce Approbation, earnestly desire...
It is with extreme diffidence I obtrude myself upon your notice in expressing an inclination to serve my country in some publick Employment. I have no meritorious claims to urge in support of my pretensions having had very little opportunity of manifesting a patriotick zeal. After receiving an education suitable to the bar, and being admitted to practise in this state, I made a small tour in...
I request that you will accept my best acknowledgments for your congratulation on my appointment to the first office in the nation. The kind manner in which you mention my past conduct equally claims the expression of my gratitude. After we had, by the smiles of Heaven on our exertions, obtained the object for which we contended, I retired at the conclusion of the war, with an idea that my...
Berne, May 1789 . Had delayed thanking TJ for kindness to him on passing through Paris “with Mrs. Tillier and Son in Law C. Penrose” because a friend who wanted to apply to TJ for information “about a family de Graffenried settled in Virginia … has detained me.” But he “will not wait longer to present my best ofers of services and Mrs. Tillier, and her sons most dutifull respects” to TJ and...
I received your kind favours of the 19 & 22 of April. the printers were very obliging in taking particular care to supply me daily with the paper’s by which I learnt the arrival and Reception of the Pressident, & vice Pressident. if I thought I could compliment in so courtly and masterly a stile, I would say that the address to the Senate was exactly what it ought to be, neither giving too...
It has been impossible to get time to write you.— Morning, Noon, and Night, has been taken up with Business, or Visits.— Yesterday the President was Sworn, amidst the Acclamations of the People.— But I must refer you to Gazettes & Spectators.— I write this abed.— M r Allen del d. me, Yesterday your Letter.— I like very much your Plan of coming on, with Charles and Thomas, before Commencement....
Permit me to congratulate you & my Country on your Appointment to the chief Presidency of the united states of America by the unanimous voice of its Citizens. That you may be happy & successful in the discharge of this important Trust is my most ardent Wish. A reliance on the Benevolence of my Countrymen & Necessity have compelled me to make an application, which I could wish I did not stand...
It is truly mortifying to me to be under the disadvantage of using a foreign language in which I am so little versed. I conceive I must have committed errors, from the interpretation you have given, Sir, to my preceding letter, in regard to two points which were far from my intention. The first is relative to the application of the general principle on which I thought that a private audience...
Can the muse, can the freind forbear! (for oh I must Call thee friend, great as thou art) to pay the poor tribute she is capable off, when she is so interested in the universal Congratulation—I thought I Could testify my Joy when I saw you—but words were vain, and my heart was so filled with respect, love, and gratitude, that I Could not utter an Idea. Be pleased to accept the enclosed...
My friends have advised me to offer myself a candidate for the office of Collector of the Impost of this State. Presuming Sir, that it would intrude too much on your time to read the letters and Certificates my friends have offered, induced me to decline accepting any to accompany this application, and I should not have enclosed the letter from the Governor of my Native State, did I not...
I am to beg your forgiveness for having so long omitted to write you—but a proof accompanies this that tho silent I have not been negligent:—Mr. Mason takes charge of your trunk, which I hope you will receive in a few days, and find made according to your Orders. I shall make up your account in a few days. In the mean time, for this and all my delays, I have one excuse to offer: extream...
By the News Papers, I find you have met with a temporary Loss—The United suffrages of my countrymen have once more taken my Brother Adams from you —from rural retirement—& the sweets of domestic Life, & again placed him in the political Hemisphere, where his merit—his knowledge—his patriotism—his virtue, will (I presume) shine with conspicuous Lustre, though surrounded by a multitude of bright...
I have received the letter you did me the honour to write me, on the twenty Seventh of last month, inclosing the Freedom of the City of New Haven elegantly engrossed on Parchment, and authenticated under the Signature of the Mayor, City Clerk and Seal of the City. May I request of you, Sir, to present my best respects and most Sincere thanks to the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Councill and...
A Stranger presumes most Respectfully to submit, the inclosed, to your Excellencies perusal and Patronage; they contain Facts, and he can for Information Concerning his Charactor, Exclusive of the Honorable Certificate, Appeal to Colonel Smith; (with whom he had the Honor to serve) for his early integrity in the American Cause. When divesting himself of all Views and Prospects which he might...
I am commanded by the House of Representatives to bring to the Senate the proceedings of the House on a resolution of the Senate of the 27th of April: Also, to communicate to the Senate the appointment of the Reverend William Lynn, D. D. to be one of the Chaplains to Congress, agreeably to the resolves of the 15th of April. Printed Source--Senate Journal.
Having had the honour of writing to your Excellency by Mr Allen, of expressing the pleasure I have recieved in common with my fellow citizens in general of your deserved elevation to the first place in the Fœderal Government of the American Country; this consideration would have precluded you the trouble of the present communication were it not for the paper accompanying, which I flatter...
The Memorial of John Lasher Most respectfully Sheweth That your Memorialist in the glorious contest which has happily secured the Independence and Liberty of the United States was among the first who engaged in the service of his Country. That at the commencment of the contest he was appointed Colonel of one of the Regiments of Militia, and in 1776 served in that Capacity in the State Levies...
It is not without regret that I reflect on the interruption that was given to the conversation I had the honor to hold with your Excellency on the subject of the etiquette which would be observed by the President of the United States, since I still find that this subject occupies much of the public attention, & I could have wished to have corrected my own opinions by a more perfect knowledge...
Desirous of being more particular in expressing my acknowledgments for the elegant Barge which was presented to me on my arrival in this City, than I could be at that moment; I must now request that you will be pleased to offer my best thanks to the Gentlemen who were Owners of it, and assure them in my name that I consider myself much honored by their polite attention. I am, Sir, Your Most...
I have the honor to lay before you the Treaties concluded, in pursuance of the Instructions received from Congress on the twenty sixth of October 1787 and second of July 1788, with several of the Indian Nations in January last. That they were not presented at an earlier period was owing, in part, to my own Indisposition—to the severity of the Winter which rendered the Communication by the...
By yesterdays post we were advised of Your Excellencys arrival at New York, and If a variety of incidents did not concur to prevent me, I should have the honor in person to congratulate you, on the gratitude and confidence, which you so emminently experience from united America. Until the adoption of the present system of national Government, It was a constant, and a painful reflection to...
When your arrival at the head of the General Government is announced, it is become my duty as it was before my inclination, to make my congratulations both to you & to my Country, which I most sincerely do, on this occasion: for however I may have been at first in opinion against the new Constitution before its ratification, I now think it the duty of every good citizen to rejoice in every...
The Memorial of Frederick Weissenfels Most Respectfully Sheweth. That he being far advanced in Years, And having no Mechanical Occupation nor any other employ, whereby he might Enjoy among his fellow Citizens a Comfortable subsistance he finds himself in Consequence thereof under Considerable Embarresments—his Character and Conduct in the Service of the United States during the late War he...
Bordeaux, 2 May 1789 . The ship Le Couteulx , 32 days from Norfolk with 875 hhds. tobacco, brought the enclosed. “She left the Capes the 26 March.” He gave to Short a packet of newspapers addressed to TJ: Short says they “are of old date say 9bre. or Decembre.” They hope for arrivals of wheat and flour from America: “They retard and the wants are Urgent.” American advices say “wheat is very...
I have this moment come to my banker to enquire if the post of this morning brought me any letter from you. I find that it did not and as it left Paris on wednesday last, I take it for granted you will not write to this place by any post posterior to that. My letter from hence desired you would direct to me post restante at Nantes as late as the 4th. I set off for that place tomorrow morning...
I must finally conclude to request of you to come on to New York as soon as possible and bring Charles and Thomas both with you if you can— if they cannot come at present let them follow as soon as they can be permitted.— I design they shall both Spend the Vacation here at least.— I want your Advice about furniture and House. bring Polly Taylor with you.— You had better land on Long Island and...
I have recd. with great Pleasure your Letters of 22d. April and 19. March. These important Letters I have not yet had time to answer, but the subjects of them shall be well weighed. I write this to introduce a Neighbour of mine, in Braintree, Captn. Benjamin Beal who is desirous of seeing Philadelphia for the first time. He was born and bred my Neighbour, has followed the sea many years and...
Your favr. of 22 Ult. is recd. I was well aware that many of my Friends and the Well Wishers to good Govt., would be prevented from making their Compliments to me, on my Departure, by their Alienation from the House from Which I Set off: but perhaps their delicacy, upon that occasion, was too great. The Duty of 6 Cents on Mollasses, appears to me to be generally reprobated at present as too...
Every Thing has happened, as I could wish Since I left you, excepting the delay of making Provision for my Subsistance; and this has proceeded from an Uncertainty what they ought to do. I am very easy on that Point, as I am determined to live in Proportion to my allowance, I beg leave to mention one Thing, which may be of Some consequence, both to the Public and to me.—If Thomas would...
I had the honor of presenting yesterday forenoon, your letter to Mrs Washington, together with the package committed to my care; and was happy to find her, & the family well. It is with pleasure I inform you, that I have made such particular & pointed arrangements with the Proprietors of the Stages, as leaves me no reason to doubt, of Mrs Washingtons being extremely well accommodated on her...
Letter not found. 3 May 1789. Acknowledged in JM to Pendleton, 17 May 1789 . The list probably kept by Peter Force (DLC: Madison Miscellany) notes that Pendleton wrote a two-page letter to JM from Virginia on this day. The summary reads: “Organization of the new government. Mr. Madison’s proposition for making provision for revenue. Virginia’s disqualifying act. Anti-federal State Elections....
I am obliged by yr. two kind favrs. of the 8th. & 19th. Past. I was indeed surprised, & in some measure Chagrined at the tardy Assembling of the members of the fœdral legislature, betraying a want of Zeal Which is rather unfavorable, tho’ it might, & I hope did, proceed from causes less reprehensible, & which may be manifested by future dilligence. Before this time the Government will have...
Puydarnat, 3 May 1789 . Introduces “Mr. Paul Cahierre an intimate friend of mine, who is sailing for america (where he hath resided for sometime already).” He was a merchant at Rouen and Paris for many years: “having taken a fancy for our Continant, [he] is going with his Lady to settle there.” As they are going to “Elizabeth Town and New york, be so kind as to deliver the letters” sent...
In answer to the letter of Messieurs Nicholas & Jacob Van Staphorst announcing your association to their house I take the liberty of tendering you my sincere felicitations and assurances that I shall ever see with great pleasure whatever tends to promote your interests. I am the more happy on this occasion as your successes will be connected with those of two gentlemen for whom I have so...
I have duly received your favors of the 16th. and 24th. of April and am obliged to you for your information of the ships arriv[ing] in your port which I beg you to continue to give me. [I] am in daily expectation of receiving my permission, and having all my baggage already packed I need not stay here more than a week after I receive it. I am determined to embark from Havre. I return you many...
Yours of Apr. 28. from Bordeaux came to hand yesterday as did Mr. Rutledge’s of the 27th. (for I must still have the privilege of acknoleging both together). The incertainty you express whether you come by Nantes, and of course whether this letter (a copy of which goes there) may not get into other hands will very much shorten it. Madame de Tessé, whose constancy to you is above reproach, has...
Les livres que vous avez eu la bonté de m’expedier me sont parvenus avanthier en assez bon etat. J’ai l’honneur de vous envoyer actuellement un ordre à Messieurs Van Staphorst de vous en payer le montant, c’est à dire la somme de cent soixante et dix florins quinze sols. Comme je compte de partir tout-de-suite pour l’Amerique, je vous prie de considerer comme non-avenues les parties des...
I have taken the liberty this day to draw on you in favor of Mr. Van Damme for 170ƒ -15s which be pleased to honour. Revising your several letters since the paiments to Turkheim & Peuchen your disbursements for me appear as follows.   ƒ    Court. By letter of 1788. May 22. Expences of boxes from Cologne  18- Do. Aug. 7. Paid Van Damme 148–11 The draught made this day in favor of Van Damme...
Your favor of April 16. covering bills to the amount of 15,500 florins came duly to hand, and should have been sooner acknoleged but that I wished at the same time to acknolege their actual paiment. I am now enabled to do this on information of yesterday from Mr. Grand’s office as to the three bills which were already due, and that the fourth will be paid as soon as due. I am happy that the...