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    • White, Alexander
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    • Washington, George
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    • Washington Presidency

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Documents filtered by: Author="White, Alexander" AND Recipient="Washington, George" AND Period="Washington Presidency"
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General Edward Stevens—solicits an appointment in the Customs particularly the District of Norfolk He is a Gentleman in high repute in his Country both as a Citizen and a Soldier. Col: Will. Heth—has I expect explained to your Excellency his particular Views—I have known him from his Infancy. There is not a man in whom I would more readily confide for the discharge of any Office he may...
It is with great diffidence I offer the enclosed but having taken that liberty will not add to your trouble by Apologies, I will only state such Facts as may enable you to judge whether th⟨is⟩ institution is like to be useful —the nature of the Country in general, its salubrity and fertility you are well acquainted with—The Academy has been supported several years by private Donations, and the...
A. White having received the enclosed from his Friend General Wood, could devise no method so effectual to inform the President of General Martins wishes and merits as by communicating the letter of General Wood. AL , DLC:GW . The enclosed letter from James Wood, lieutenant governor of Virginia, to Virginia congressman White has not been identified. General Martin is probably Joseph Martin, a...
It is with real pleasure I obey the commands of a respectable meeting of the Citizens of Frederick County, in communicating the enclosed Resolutions expressive of the result of their deliberations. I am with sentiments of the most perfect respect Sir Your Obt Servant ALS , DLC:GW ; LB , DLC:GW . Woodville, White’s country estate, was near Winchester, Virginia.
I embrace the first opportunity of acknowledging the receipt of your letter of 28th Ulo—which did not come to hand till yesterday—The preference given me on this occasion is extremely flattering and although I feel a diffidence in my capacity to discharge the duties of so important a trust, in the execution of which I doubt not many things may occur which my line of life has not led to an...
On Saturday evening I received from the Department of State the Commission with which you have been pleased to honor me as a Commissioner of the Federal City, accompanied by a letter from yourself expressed in terms so friendly and confidential as to induce me to explain fully to you Sir, my sentiments respecting this Appointment —When I received your letter of 28th April I was on the point of...
I have the honor of your letter of 15th instant. I sensibly feel the impropriety of giving you so much trouble, but flatter myself that the sensations excited by being placed in a situation entirely new will in some measure apologize—I shall not enlarge on that subject, but only observe that the apprehension of finding myself inadequate to the Task, and that alone occasioned my reluctance—A...
I returned from Frederick yesterday—Visiting the Works this morning an alteration of part of the Plan of the Capital agreed to by the President was brought into view —I should at all times (and more especially, after some late declarations) with great diffidence offer an opinion on a subject of this kind, but without a scientific knowledge of Architecture I confess the alteration proposed...
I purpose to set out for Virginia tomorrow and to return about the end of November—You would no doubt observe that I neither signed the letter lately addressed to you by my Colleagues on the subject of an application to the Assembly of Maryland for a Loan, nor transmitted my reasons for with holding my signature—I will now explain the motives of my conduct in both instances—I did not sign the...
Agreeably to my expectation I left Philada on Monday the 9th instant and arrived at Washington the ensuing Wednesday; the measures adopted to avail ourselves of the guarantee of Congress have been communicated by the Board, but my Colleagues seemed in a state of suspense respecting the commencement of the Works, having no assurance on which they could rely of obtaining the means of carrying...