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Your chariot was ready to have set off the day after Zachary arrived here; but an unlucky use of the permission you had given me respecting your waggon, has prevented it’s departure. The post after you left us, I received information from Philadelphia that my nailrod had been lodged in Richmond before the last week in November, and could not be forwarded here for want of a conveyance. I...
All are well here: Jefferson particularly so. Almost immediately after the receipt of your order to pay Mr. Divers 120. D. and before I could give him notice, he went to Richmond, and returned only 3 days ago. I saw him yesterday and told him how long I had had your order to pay him that sum, which had been in constant readiness for him, and was still so. He appeared perfectly satisfied. I...
I recieved yesterday your favor of Feb. 20. and am truly concerned and alarmed at the crisis respecting Varina, and the more so as I apprehend the mode of procrastination proposed by you cannot be made use of. It was in a letter I wrote you from Germantown , if you recollect, after I had written to LeRoy, that I mentioned the possibility of a cross bill brought by myself &c. the object of...
I received your favor by Capt. Heath, and notice what is said therein on the subject of the Marquee. Capt. Singleton has been certainly misinformed as to the delivery of it at Monticello. You know it was in the summer of 1782. I was at home the whole of that summer. My situation at that time enables me to say with certainty that I was not from home one day from the time the Marquee was...
All well here and in expectation of seeing you on Sunday next. Dr. Taylor has enjoined my judgments against him for delay. The pretext is that I have refused to execute a deed to him for Elkhill . But I never was so mistaken if I did not by his direction reacknolege the former deed before the clerks of the General court in Richmond on the 4th. of June 1794. or within a very few days after...
Your two favors of Jan. 24. and Feb. 3. are both recieved. We have had a very fine winter a few days only excepted about the middle of January. This day sennight was the coldest morning ever known in this country as far as my observations have gone. The mercury was at 1¾°. I never before saw it lower than 6°. in Virginia.—From what I hear of the state of the three notched road I am sorry I...
My letters of the last post inform me of Mussi’s having sent on my clover seed; so that it is to him I must remit the 51 D.—67 c. balance of Stras’s money, after taking out Mr. Lyle’s and Taylor’s. I must trouble you therefore to try and get a bill on Philadelphia for that sum paiable to Joseph Mussi, merchant Philadelphia, at the corner of 7th. and Market streets, and to inclose it to him....
We are all well, and nothing new in our neighborhood. I have not heard from Edgehill this week. My threshing machine will only get to work this afternoon. Mr. W. Hylton senr. who called here on his way to the springs, tells me he has information in a letter from Sr. George Strickland that 2. steers will get out 120. bushels of wheat a day with it. This is encoraging. You will be astonished to...
We are all well here, except that the children have little colds, which however are going off. As you will be out of the post-road, I shall not write again, which I mention, that my silence may give no uneasiness. We have now fine weather for work. As your clover seed did not sprout, I have advised the leaving it unsowed till you come. I shall not sow mine till the last week in March. I had...
The price of wheat and whether it can be sold for the rise of the market? The price of molasses. Whether my things from Philadelphia addressed to Colo. Gamble are arrived? If they are, send them up by Henderson’s people of preference to the other things. Send by them the sugar &c for which I wrote to Colo. Gamble . After the things last expected from Philadelphia I would wish to receive the...
Biby’s boats are arrived and have not brought my 4d. nail machine nor hoop iron. Gamble & Temple write me it was in the hands of a Mr. Ball, and sent somewhere up, perhaps to Westham. Will you be so good as to have it sought for, or it may lie months in some out of the way place, or perhaps never be found. It had better come up in some waggon to Colo. Bell, if it can be handily got aboard one,...
Your favor of the 20th. is received. It is not in my power to forward the land warrants for my certificates, as Clarke did not return them to me. I question if the surveyor returned them to him. I shall write to him by the next post, but you will be here before he can answer. He writes me that he put 300. ℔ tobacco of mine into a hhd. of yours. This may enter into our general account if you...
It is possible that in the course of the voyages you are about to undertake for your health, you may sometimes be disappointed in the remittances provided to be made to you or your expences may exceed them. If therefore in any such event you should find it necessary to apply to other resources for money, and the addition of my name to your own would facilitate your obtaining it, I pray you to...
Your favor of the 1st. inst. came to hand on the 6th. We the next day strewed some clover seed on moistened cotton. This is the 6th. day, and the plate has been set on the hearth every night. They have not sprouted; but I think they are swelled. By the next post we may probably decide whether they will sprout or not. The weather continues cold, snowy, and unfriendly to the labors of the field....
I wrote you by post . The weather having broke away we are trying to get the waggon off before the river becomes impassable. I put on board her a box for Mr. Wythe containing my whole and precious collection of the printed laws of Virginia, to be bound as noted to Mr. Wythe who has occasion to keep them some time for his use. I have taken the liberty of saying you would answer the charges of...
All are well here and at Edgehill. The most remarkeable fact in our neighborhood is the marriage of Capt. Allcock to Mrs. Walker, widow of Dr. Walker. I have no information of the last week’s work at Edgehill. Mine was never more backward. Petit is entirely ruined by Milton. He is 40. or 50. acres behind Page in his ploughing. He is not more than half done the wheat fallowing; tho’ we have had...
I recieved by the last post your favor from Doctr. Le Mayeur’s. Your horse also came safe, and the one you desired will be delivered to the post tomorrow morning: but in very bad plight, having been surfieted treading wheat. Zachary sends a saddle and mail [pelon], but says there is neither bridle nor straps.—We are all well. Maria comes down stairs to-day for the first time. The children in...
We received the day before yesterday your favor of July 28. from Norfolk , and before that had recieved several from you written from different parts of your road. It has been impossible to write to you in return on account of the rapidity and incertainty of your movements. The present is sent to New York tho’ with little prospect of it’s finding you there, as it cannot be there till the 19th....
Your waggon with Suck and Critta set off from here on Wednesday the 13th. By the time they got to Pouncey’s hill they found the roads so deep that they could not get along. They returned to Edgehill and carried the greatest part of their load to Milton to be sent down by water. Since that such floods of rain have fallen, and the river so risen that all communication has been cut off for some...
I received your favor from Staunton , and was happy to learn that your journey was agreeing with you. All here are well. Mr. and Mrs. D. Randolph left us the day before yesterday for the springs. Mr. Hurt yesterday, after putting our clocks into very good order. Robertson informs me he has got out about 500. bushels of wheat, and supposes himself half done. He goes on with his fallows at the...
We are all well here. Jefferson was never in finer health. Tho’ our winter has on the whole been a fine one, we have had some severe weather. This morning the thermometer was at 1°¾ above nought; I never before saw it below 6°. in this state. The wind has got Southwardly and promises a change. Corn is a very scarce article in our neighborhood. My crop of it fell vastly short of even moderate...
Your’s of the 16th. inst. from Richmd. came to hand last night. I believe it would be better to do without herrings till the new season, even if we could get them, considering the price. I have recieved no advice of any port wine having been sent to me by any body, and I never ordered any. If that delivered Mr. Brown be really addressed to me, you are welcome to it, and in every case to do...
I have not written to you by the last posts expecting you would be on the road. Your last seems to suppose you may still recieve this at Richmond. The lad whom you mention to have eloped from Varina is at Edgehill. My groceries, and rope are arrived at Charlottesville. We had in the mean time fallen on an easy and quick method of taking down our columns, which was but the work of one day. I...
Mr. Stuart having thought it best to associate a careful person at Staunton with James, they arrived here this morning with their sorrowful charge . They found here my sisters Bolling Carr and Marks. It is great consolation to us that your stay at Staunton had been so long as to render it impossible that the journey could have had any effect on the accident which happened. Anne and Jefferson...
Yours of the 4th. inst. is duly recieved, and I rejoice that you got down without any accident from the cold, of which I had great apprehensions. The following is extracted from my diary to satisfy the wish you express to know what has been the degree of cold here. sunrise 3. P.M. sunrise Dec. 19. 50°. 48. Jan. 1. 30. 43 20. 19.  2. 28. 33 21.
I wrote to Martha last week. We all continue well. Jefferson’s kunophobia appearing to increase so as to become troublesome, and almost a subject of uneasiness, we have determined to take a puppy into the house to cure him by forcing a familiarity to the form and safety of the animal. This is but the 2d. day of the experiment, so that we cannot yet judge of it’s operation.—We have had no...
It is so cold that the freezing of the ink on the point of my pen renders it difficult to write. We have had the thermometer at 12°. My works are arrested in a state entirely unfinished, and I fear we shall not be able to resume them. Clarke has sold our wheat in Bedford for 8/6 and the rise to the 1st. of June, with some other modifications. It appears to be a good sale. He preferred it to...
I understand with much pain that you are dissatisfied with the articles of agreement which, on behalf of your son, I entered into with you for the purchase of Edgehill. I do not write the present with a view to insist on those articles being enforced. Far from it. If you wish to rescind them, it is sufficient ground for me to wish the same: and I know that in this your son has but one mind...
I wrote to you by Doctr. Currie . We have no letter from you since that from Staunton: but we have heard by travellers of your having soon left the warm springs. Those who were sick here have recovered. The children are well, as is the rest of the family except Maria. A slight dysentery which has pervaded the neighborhood has attacked her. She is now in the 5th. day of it. We cannot see any...
It is not till now that I begin to relinquish the hope you had given me of visiting New York this summer. Besides the pleasure on which I had counted, of seeing you here, I had proposed to see whether we could not arrange together a matter which our children have at heart. I find it is the strong wish of both to settle in Albemarle. They both consider Varina as too unhealthy, a consideration...