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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Randolph, Edmund" AND Period="Washington Presidency"
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Whilst I thank you for your favr of the 23d. Ult: I must remind you that it does not contain the promised information on the Case of the French Consul here. I am led to it by being myself just reminded by him of the omission on my part. The plan of an immediate temporary impost was what first occurred on the subject. It is not yet abandoned, but the practicability is questionable. The plan of...
I have received the letter you did me the honour to write me from Richmond, on the twelfth of Febuary—and esteem myself much honoured by the confidence you are pleased to place in me—The attachment I feel to your family concurs with the personal acquaintance I once had and with all I have since heard of your Character to give to your Recommendation the greatest Weight. But as the Constitution...
I have been favored with yours of the 19th. instant and thank you for the answer to Mr. St. John’s enquiries. The apprehensions of Mrs. Randolph give me unfeigned concern, but I indulge strong hopes that they proceed from an imaginary cause. There are so many symptoms which mimic the cancerous that it would be wrong to suffer appearances to prevail against the favorable chances. At the same...
The inclosed paper contains the proposition made on Monday last on the subject of amendments. It is limited to points which are important in the eyes of many and can be objectionable in those of none. The structure & stamina of the Govt. are as little touched as possible. Nothing of a controvertible nature can be expected to make its way thro’ the caprice & discord of opinions which would...
The inclosed bill relating to the Judiciary has been just introduced into the Senate. Having not yet looked it over I can say nothing of its merits. You will be a better judge, and such remarks as your leisure will permit, will be acceptable & useful. A very interesting Question is started—By whom officers appointed during pleasure by the Presidt. & Senate are to be displaced?—whether the...
My last stated a question relating to the power of removal from offices then on the anvil of the H. of Rs. I now inclose the discussions as conveyed to the public thro’ the Newspapers. It is not necessary to apprize you that the reasonings on both sides are mutilated, often misapprehended, and not unfrequently reversed. You will perceive yourself that much of the reasoning is also founded on a...
I have been favd. with yours of the 30 Ult. and thank you for your remarks on the Judiciary bill. I am glad to find you concurring in the decision as to the power of removal. It seems to meet with general approbation North of Virga. and there too as far as I yet learn. Mr. Pendleton is fully in opinion with you. So is Monroe I am told . The more the question is weighed the more proper I think...
For a week past the subject of amendts. has exclusively occupied the H. of Reps. Its progress has been exceedingly wearisome not only on account of the diversity of opinions that was to be apprehended, but of the apparent views of some to defeat by delaying a plan short of their wishes, but likely to satisfy a great part of their companions in opposition throughout the Union. It has been...
Your favor of the 2d Ultimo came duly to hand. A tedious and painful disorder which deprived me for many Weeks of the use of my pen, and which consequently required the greater exertion of it when I was able to set up, is the best apology I can make for not having acknowledged the receipt of the above letter sooner. The list of associates who purchased 100 Tickets in the lottery of the...
Impressed with a conviction that the due administration of justice is the firmest pillar of good government, I have considered the first arrangement of the judicial department as essential to the happiness of our country and to the stability of its’ political system—hence the selection of the fittest characters to expound the laws, and dispense justice, has been an invariable object of my...