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    • Jefferson, Thomas
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    • Randolph, Edmund
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The inclosed papers will shew you that cessions are to be made by landholders near George town, to the President for carrying into effect the establishment of the federal government there. In all cases where it is permitted, the lands are to be paid for, and the private title cleared off. I am not certain whether some of the cessions are not with a reservation of a portion of the land, without...
The inclosed memorial from the British minister on the case of Thomas Pagan, containing a complaint of injustice in the dispensations of law by the courts of Massachusets to a British subject, the President approves of my referring it to you to report thereon your opinion of the proceedings, and whether any thing, and what, can or ought to be done by the government in consequence thereof.—I am...
Mr. Van Berckel, the resident for the United Netherlands with this government, having, as you will perceive by the copies of his letters inclosed, complained of an infraction of the law of nations by an officer of this state, entering his house and therein serving a process, I take the liberty of putting into your hands the inclosed copies with a desire that you will proceed in such due course...
The last post brought me your favor of the 26th of August; but it brought me at the same time so much business to be answered by return of post, and which did not admit of delay, that I was obliged to postpone the acknowledgment of yours. I thank you sincerely for what respects myself. Though I see the pen of the Secretary of the Treasury plainly in the attack on me, yet, since he has not...
I have the honor to inclose you a letter from the Minister of France with sundry papers which accompanied it respecting the unlawful proceedings of a Capt. Hickman of the schooner Dolphin, in bringing away from Martinique sundry slaves the property of persons residing there, and making sale of them in the U.S. and to ask the favor of you to advise what may be proper for punishing all offenders...
I take the liberty of submitting to your consideration sundry letters which have passed between Governor Martin, Governor Blount and myself relative to intrusions on the lands of the U.S. in the South-Western territory, and of asking your advice Whether any and what proceedings should be instituted for asserting the rights of the U.S. against the intruders? I have the honor to be with great...
Will you be so good as to tell me what answer to give to the interrogatory in the last sentence of this letter? [ Reply by Randolph: ] I do not see any absolute, or indeed probably necessity for the ancient treaties. But I am not certain, that it may not be satisfactory to have those, made with the state governments; since some of the commissioners are new in this kind of business; and might...
I received yesterday the inclosed letter from Mr. Hammond Minister Plenipotentiary of Great Britain on the case of Hooper and Pagan whereon you have been before consulted. I take the liberty of resorting again to you for the information which your presence in the supreme court will have enabled you to give, or which you may have otherwise obtained, and for your opinion on the case in it’s...
Th: Jefferson incloses for the examination of the Atty. Genl. the abstract form of a patent proposed under the new law , wherein will be inserted the title only of the discovery, within the body of the instrument; and the description required by law, to be in a schedule annexed to and making part of the letters patent. This will admit the very words of the petitioner to be used, without the...
On the information received from Crosby , and which I directed him to communicate to you, I have prepared the inclosed letter to him according to the President’s instructions . If you approve of it, be so good as to send it on to him. But if you are not satisfied that you can set some effectual process on foot, it would be better to hold it up till the President’s return, that he may not be...
Having this moment received and communicated the inclosed Memorial from the British Minister to the President, relative to the Capture of the British vessel the Grange, by a French Frigate, I must ask the favor of you to consider the Case, and to give your opinion of the law arising thereon. These questions seem particularly material—By whom is the validity of the Capture to be decided? By...
I understood Colo. H. yesterday that he should confer again with the President on the subject of our deliberation . As that is not exactly the channel thro’ which I would wish my objections to be represented, should the President mention the subject to you, I will thank you to communicate to him this note, or it’s substance. PrC ( DLC ); undated; unsigned; letter-pressed upside down at foot of...
I have been still reflecting on the draught of the letter from the Secretary of the Treasury to the Custom house officers, instructing them to be on the watch as to all infractions or tendencies to infraction of the laws of neutrality by our citizens and to communicate the same to him. When this paper was first communicated to me, tho’ the whole of it struck me disagreeably, I did not in the...
I inclose you a letter of Genet’s of July 9. and the draught of an answer to it, which is approved by the other gentlemen but we wish your sentiments on it, and as soon as possible as it is pressing.—The other of June 22. is only under deliberation, and sent to you for your information and consideration against we meet again. [ Note by TJ: ] July 23. 93. E.R. returned this note and the two...
Having determined to retire from my office before the term of paiment of the inclosed bill and so informed the President, it is indispensable for me to wind up all my money concerns as fast as I can, in which operation I am actually engaged. This circumstance renders it impossible for me to enter into any new engagement here, my first object now being to see myself cleared out, and neither...
Suppose interest at 6 pr. Cent, the arrangement to commence Oct. 1. 1793.  £ £ 67.567 with 8. years interest =  100. 70.422 7 =  100 73.529 6 =  100 76.923 5 =  100
Th. Jefferson submits to the Secretaries of the treasury & War & the Atty Genl. some sketches of Notes to be signed for the President. As they are done from memory only, they will be pleased to insert whatever more their memories suggest as material. Particularly, the final conclusion as to the express-vessel will be to be inserted, which is most accurately know to the Secy. of the Treasury....
I have the honor to inclose you the papers of Messrs. Wilson Potts & Easton, merchants of Alexandria, complaining that their brig the Jesse has been taken by a French privateer called the Sans pareil , carried into Charleston, and there condemned by the French Consul and sold. The object of their application is to obtain national interference for redress. But this measure is always slow,...
The Minister Plenipotentiary of France has inclosed to me the copy of a letter of the 16th. inst. which he addressed to you, stating that some libellous publications had been made against him by Mr. Jay, chief Justice of the US. and Mr. King one of the Senators for the state of New York, and desiring that they might be prosecuted. This letter has been laid before the President, according to...
I have to thank you for the transmission of the letters from Genl. Gates, La Motte , and Hauterive. I perceive by the latter that the partisans of the one or the other principle (perhaps of both) have thought my name a convenient cover for declarations of their own sentiments. What those are to which Hauterive alludes, I know not, having never seen a newspaper since I left Philadelphia (except...
You are so kind as to ask what is to be done with the 4. drums of figs from Simpson . As his letter mentioned that two of them were for the Presidt. I hope you will have delivered them. Of the other two, acccept one for yourself and put the other on board any vessel bound for Richmond addressed to me to the care of Colo. Gamble.—Among the MSS . you had from hence were two 4to. vols. the one...
Tho Mr. Bertrand mentions having seen me at Paris, (of which I remember nothing) yet it is evident his letter was meant for me as Secretary of state, and not in my private capacity. The proposition to the government for an assignment of lands can only be answered by the government, if to be answered at all. I therefore inclose you his letter and papers. I also send back 6. packages destined...
I thank you for forwarding Mr. L’Epine’s letter. Dombey was a man of sense and science, and had resided some years in Spanish America, with which he had made himself much acquainted. Should we have a war with Spain, he would have been a most valuable acquisition to us. I now think it probable that among his papers will be found a good deal of information as to that country, and particularly...
Your favor of Aug. 28. finds me in bed under a paroxysm of the Rheumatism, which has now kept me for ten days in constant torment and presents no hope of abatement. But the express and the nature of the case requiring immediate answer, I write to you under this situation. No circumstances my dear Sir will ever more tempt me to engage in any thing public: I thought myself perfectly fixed in...
A merchant neighbor of mine (Mr. Fleming) going to Philadelphia for his fall goods, and being to return with them by water himself, offers me a good opportunity of collecting the remains of my books left in Philadelphia. In a memorandum kept here, during my absence, of books lent, I find the following set down to you. Tacito del Davanzati. 2. v. Tull’s husbandry. Da Costa’s fossils Crown...
I have received from a Mr. D’Ivernois, a Genevan now in London (author of the history of Geneva I once put into your hands) several letters informing me of the suppression of the college of Geneva by the late revolution there, and proposing it’s transplantation to this country. The desire of the President to apply his shares in the canals of Patowmack and James river to some public purpose,...
I have to acknolege the receipt of your favor of Apr. 11. and I now inclose the letter of Mr. Short on the diplomatic arrangement which you desire. It is marked private, as you see, having been a part of his private correspondence with me, which was the reason I did not leave it in the office. I take the liberty of inclosing to you a letter for him which I will thank you to forward by the...