You
have
selected

  • Recipient

    • Pickering, Timothy
  • Period

    • Washington Presidency

Author

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 10 / Top 11

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Recipient="Pickering, Timothy" AND Period="Washington Presidency"
Results 1-30 of 104 sorted by recipient
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
Hamilton, History John C. Hamilton, Life of Alexander Hamilton, a History of the Republic of the United States of America (Boston, 1879). , VI, 243. John Church Hamilton states that H wrote to members of George Washington’s cabinet on this date. No further evidence of this correspondence, however, has been found.
By The President’s direction B. Dandridge respectfully transmits to the Secy of State a Memorial of sundry merchants of New York—The President requests the Secretary to return an answer to the Letter from the Committee, which accompanied the Memorial, informing them that the most pointed & strong remonstrances have been made against the Conduct of which they complain. B.D. also encloses a...
In the Estimate laid before Congress at their last Sessions, I included as an Anticipation of the late Superintendant of Finance the Amount of a draft issued by him in your favor on the late Receiver of Taxes for the State of New York for Fifty thousand Dollars no part of which appears to have been paid. The circumstances attending this Anticipation not being sufficiently known by the...
Captain Ford & Lady arrived here yesterday: they left Niagara the 13th ulto & came by the way of Oswego. He gives me some information of things which took place after we left that country, and which, as they probably will be new to you, I herewith communicate them. He says that Talbot, Brant and Shehan had arrived at Niagara some days before he sailed: that they informed the Governor, that as...
Colo. Pickering will attend to the Suggestion of Mr McHenry, & then Return the letter, directed to Colo. T. Blount back, as requested. If there are any authorities which can be consulted on the Remonstrance of Mr Vear, it might be well to have recourse to them. The opinion I gave was from what I conceive to be consistent with propriety and us but, though I have no reason to it, it is always...
As I cannot, without peculiar inconvenience to my private concerns, remain in this City beyond sunday next, I desire that all the business in your department which calls for my immediate attention, may be presented to me in the course of this week. DLC : Papers of George Washington.
I communicated your letter to Mr. Jay & now give you our joint sense. Considering the nature of the transaction and what must necessarily have been presumed to be the intent, & that the authority is on a public subject & between two nations, we think that a decision by two out of three commissioners must be sufficient. We know nothing but an immediate personal interest in property which may be...
Did Mr Liston furnish the letter you asked of him, in favor of Cap: Talbots agency, to the West Indies? Has any Representation been made to him, independent of that application, consequent of the evidence you have recd of the Impressment of our Seamen? When I left Philadelphia, it was expected, & from Mr & Mrs Liston themselves, that they were to follow us in ten days; and allowing a few days...
I enclose the translation of the letter which was transmitted to the Secretary of War by the Governor of New York—The translation was made yesterday in great haste, and if it should not be sufficiently clear, referrence had better be had to the original, in the possession of the Secy of War. The President wishes, in your conversation with Colo. Louis, that you would learn the precise time of...
In the public letter which accompanies this you will receive such instructions for your conduct in your mission to the Seneca Tribe of Indians, as may without impropriety be communicated to them—Some others shall here be added more peculiarly proper for your own ear. It is particularly desireable that they be made to understand that all business between them and any part of the United States...
Resolved, that The President of the United States be requested to cause to be laid before this House, the Treaty mentioned in his communications to both Houses of Congress, at the opening of the present Session, as having been negotiated with certain Indian Nations northwest of the river Ohio. By the President’s order B. Dandridge respectfully transmits to the Secy of State the above copy of a...
[ Philadelphia, August 23, 1791. On August 26, 1791, Pickering wrote to Hamilton : “I have received … your letter of the 23d instant.” Letter not found. ] Pickering had been appointed Postmaster General on August 12, 1791.
Colo. Bell of Charlottesville called on me yesterday and informed me that he had recieved your appointment as postmaster at that station, which however he found himself obliged to decline accepting, on account of his frequent absences from home, rendered necessary by his commercial affairs. It was certainly impossible to have named a fitter person, if he would have undertaken it. In the event...
This is merely intended to let you know that, your two letters, the one official, the other private, of the 30th ulto have both been received. If the Authors of such resolutions as are forwarded to me, relative to the Treaty with G. Britain mean well they will be benefited by such sentiments as you have communicated to Judge Walton: for nothing short of profound ignorance, or consummate...
The enclosed Instructions for Mr Ellicot (as now amended) are approved—I was out when they came, or they would have been returned sooner. MHi .
Herewith you will receive my signature to the Commission appointing Samuel Williams of Massachusetts, Consul for the United States at the Port of Hamburgh &ca—transmitted to me in your letter of the 29th Ulto. If Mr La Motte possesses much experimental, as well as theoretical knowledge in the casting of Cannon &ca there can be no doubt of the utility of his Services—and coming with his family...
Your private letters of the 19th, 19th, and 20th instant have been duly received. The request of Mr J. Jones, to forward his letter to Colo. Monroe, is opposed to the speedy departure of Mr D—— for France; and yet the Gentleman who gave me the information spoke of it as a matter not doubtful: but added indeed (a circumstance I did not mention in my former letter) that it was on Mr Swan he...
Having from time to time through the winter and down to the present day received repeated information that the post rider between Richmond and Charlottesville, and consequently along the rest of that line, has been and continues extremely unpunctual, sometimes not going even as far as Charlottesville (only 75 miles of the route) for three weeks, and often missing a fortnight, I have thought it...
Your letter of the 27th ulto is received. I am sorry Mr De Witt, from the competency of his abilities to discharge the duties of the Office of Surveyor General, declines accepting it. Colo. Tinsley’s recommendations, go more to the respectability of his character, than to his scientific knowledge. The first is essential, but not sufficient without the other. I will obtain the best information...
If there be any thing yet to do , which can with propriety be done, towards fulfilling the several Treaties which the United States have entered into (without specifically naming them) it is my desire that there may be no delay in the execution: and if upon examining of them carefully, any matters should be found therein requiring the attention of either of the other Departments, that these...
Your letter of the 27th instant was received by the last Post to Alexandria. I thank you for the information contained in it; as I shall for any further communication of the sentiments of the people respecting the treaty, which you may be able to obtain, and think worthy of transmission: for, as it is an interesting subject, on which mens minds are a good deal occupied, I should like, as far...
At the conclusion of my public employments, I have thought it expedient to notice the publication of certain forged letters which first appeared in the year 1777, and were obtruded upon the public as mine. They are said by the editor to have been found in a small portmanteau that I had left in the care of my Mulatto servant named Billy, who, it is pretended, was taken prisioner at Fort Lee, in...
With much pleasure did I receive the information, contained in your letter of the 30th Ulto, of the ratification of the Treaty with Spain, by the Government of that Country. The unwelcome news of the Plague being at Algiers, is an Alloy thereto; but we must trust that Providence will prevent our unhappy fellow-citizens at that place from suffering by that malady. Much is it to be regretted...
Some time since Mr. McCormick spoke to me about the case of his Kinsman Mr. Pitcairn whom Mr. Monroe had prevented from exercising the functions of Consul. I can, in justice, inform you that this Gentleman is well considered in our City and that his political principles have been understood to be very friendly to the French Revolution; nor have we any doubt that his sentiments towards our own...
Your two letters—both bearing date the 21st instant—with their enclosures, were received by the last Mail to Alexandria. It would have been unfortunate, and much indeed to have been regretted, if the French government had had as great cause of complaint against the conduct of the United States, as they have shewn a disposition to complain. It was natural to expect, tho’ it was not easy to...
My letters to the Secretary of the Treasury of the 4th & 6th Instant, with the present enclosure, conveys fully the sentiments of the Attorney General with respect to the best mode of executing the Act "For the relief and Protection of American Seamen". He has, since his opinion was transmitted in the above letter of the 6th, consulted two of our most eminent Lawyers, in these parts, and finds...
I had no time yesterday morning to look into the gazettes; nor did I know until the evening, that the French frigate Medusa had slipped her Cables & put to Sea on the 31st ulto; and was followed in a few hours by the Africa. This circumstance, be the result what it may, I regret exceedingly; & because the effect of the order as it relates to the British will be the same as if the Africa had...
If I recollect right, Chancellor Livingston while Secy for foreign Affairs reported a censure upon Our Commissioners who made the peace with G Britain for not obeying their instructions with regard to France. Will you favour me in confidence with the real state of this business? I was at the time a member of Congress. It was immediately on the arrival of the provisional articles. I trust my...
The information contained in a letter of which the enclosed is a correct copy, (with the reservation only of names, agreeably to the request of the writer) may serve as a comment upon the conduct of the Owner of the Privateer Flying Fish; and as a developement also of the intentions of the French government so far as it relates to the Commerce of the United States with Great Britain. The...
The numerous & various reports which I have received from people who were not possessed of any accurate information with respect to the state of the malignant fever with which Philadelphia is so unfortunately afflicted, and my intention being to return thither, or to it’s neighbourhood about the first of next month, have induced me to ask this information from you—and I beg you will advise me...