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Letter not found: to William Pearce, 10 Jan. 1796 . On 17 Jan., Pearce wrote GW: “I Receved your Letter of the 10th Inst.”
Received of Alexander Hamilton, Fifty Dollars, towards procuring Machines for a Cotton Manufactory. DS , in handwriting of H, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. For a “list of Mr Willm Pearce’s Machines,” see “Receipt from William Pearce,” August 20, 1791, note 2 .
[ Philadelphia ] November 18, 1791 . “Received November 18. 1791 of Alexander Hamilton Fifty Dollars on account of Machines for a Cotton Manufactory.” D , in the handwriting of H and signed by Pearce, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. For “A list of Mr Willm Pearce’s Machines,” see “Receipt from William Pearce,” August 20, 1791, note 2 .
You will receive this letter from the hands of Mr Izard, to whom I request you to pay attention, and make his visit to Mount Vernon as convenient and agreeable to him as may be in your power. I am Your friend &ca ALS (photocopy), DLC:GW , series 9.
Received Philadelphia November 10. 1791 of Alexander Hamilton One hundred and fifty Dollars on account of Machines. D , in writing of H and signed by Pearce, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. For “A List of Mr Willm Pearce’s Machines,” see “Receipt from William Pearce,” August 20, 1791, note 2 .
The newspapers tell us you have invented a machine by which 700. ℔ of cotton a day can be cleaned of it’s seed. Knowing that this operation has been one of our greatest difficulties in the course of our houshold manufacture in Virginia, I feel much interest in this discovery. The purpose of this letter is merely to ask of you whether the newspaper information be true. Because if it be, I shall...
Received Philadelphia Sep 7. 1791 of Alexander Hamilton, Fifty Dollars towards providing Machines for a Cotton Manufactory. D , in writing of H and signed by Pearce, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. For a list of these machines, see “Receipt from William Pearce,” August 20, 1791, note 2 .
If this letter should reach your hands, it will be delivered by Mr Weston, who with his lady may take a ride from Alexandria to Mount Vernon. Should this happen, I request you will make their visit as agreeable as your situation will enable you to do. I am Your friend &ca ALS (photocopy), reproduced in Historical Review of Berks County , vol. III, no. 2 (January 1938). GW probably was...
Your letter of the 3d instt is this moment received. The badness of the roads has occasioned irregularity in the Post. I approve your repairing my house in Alexandria with my own People (preparing every thing that can be, at home) and of your doing it in the manner proposed; that is, to board between the houses in a neat & workman like manner & to do the three sides of the lot with White Oak...
Your letter of the 31st of Augt from Chester Town, came duly to hand; but as you did not acknowledge the receipt of the one I wrote you from hence this day week, I presume it had not got to hand; Owing, I conceive to a misapprehension of mine as to the time of closing the Mail for the Eastern shore which I find is an hour and an half earlier than those which go Southerly or Easterly. I put my...
Your letter of the 27th with the reports came to hand yesterday —and I am glad to find you have met with a supply of twine in Alexandria, as there is no prospect that has yet opened, of getting it from hence in time and I have no doubt that under all chances fishing yourself will be more profitable than hiring out the landing for Sixty pounds. I am not disposed to take any thing less for my...
Your letter of the 5th, and the reports of the preceeding week, have been received. I am glad to hear your wheat harvest is secured. If it yields well it will be fortunate as there is no doubt of the price being good. The Indian corn will have no cause to complain from the want of heat, for some days past. If nothing more than I foresee at present, happens to prevent it, I shall leave this...
I was glad to find by your letter of the 30th of August, and the reports of the preceeding week, that you had recommenced seeding, ⟨w⟩ith more favorable weather. If the latter should continue good, and the ground can be put in tolerable order, all the Wheat, sowed by the middle of this month will be in the ground in good Season; and if the Autumn is favorable, any time before the end of it,...
I am quite surprized to find by your letter of the 24th instant (which with the Reports came duly to hand) that your crops had stood in need of Rain. There has been no three days together without it, at this place, since I arrived here; and some times for whole days and nights, with little or no intermission. The exhausted state of Provisions (bread) in Europe; the demand for flour there; and...
Cyrus was obliged to come on to this place, in order to take the horses back, which Mr Frestal & Mr La Fayette rode, which is the cause of his delay. Mrs Washington desires me to in form you that there was some Butter left in the Cellar, and some Beef in a Tub which (after supplying James) may be applied to any uses you think proper. Let my Study be cleaned out, & the Room afterwards locked...
Your letter of the 5th, with its enclosures, I received yesterday. I propose to commence my journey for Mount Vernon tomorrow—but as the road through Maryland, by information, is almost impassable, & business will detain me a day or two at the federal city, I do not expect to reach home before Sunday (this day week). This being the case, my letter will be short; I shall add however, that I...
I learn with concern from your letter of the 18th instant, that your crops were still labouring under a drought, and most of them very much injured. At disappointments and losses which are the effects of Providential acts, I never repine; because I am sure the alwise disposer of events knows better than we do, what is best for us, or what we deserve. Two or three fine rains have fallen here in...
Your letter of the 3d instant, with the Weekly Reports, was received yesterday; and I have also seen Mr Lear, who arrived here yesterday about the sametime. As there is no prospect from the last European accounts (down to the first of March) of Peace; but on the contrary, every appearance of a vigorous prosecution of the War—at least for another Campaign—and they speak (tho’ flour is low in...
The enclosed letter for Miss Betcy Custis relates to a matter, respecting which, I have made some enquiry in her behalf — Put it into her own hands, if she is at Mount Vernon—and as she might wish, perhaps, to revolve the subject a little, before she communicates the contents to any oth⟨ers⟩ give it to her when she is alo⟨ne⟩⟨ mutilated ⟩ letter also, which only serves to cover it. I am Your...
The Post which ought (in course) to have arrived here On Saturday last, will not be in, it seems, until tomorrow. When it arrives, I shall (if anything requires immediate notice) by the Post of Wednesday write to you—If not, I shall delay doing it until the usual time—that is, on Sunday next. By the last Post I sent you a bank note for One hundred dollars, to pay Mr Dulany—I hope it got safe...
I arrived in this city on Saturday at noon—about which time I recd your letter of the 29th Ulto. It gives me pleasure to hear that your grain and grass have benefitted by the late rains. As both are liable to great changes from the viscissitudes of weather, mention every week what the then appearance of the fields and meadows are; particular whether any grain is to be expected from the injured...
Your letter of the 31st of last month, enclosing the weekly reports, came duly to hand—yesterday. Let the person who is to supply you with plank & Shingles, have the precise length of the first given to him, that it may not waste in cutting. This length you will be able to ascertain from knowing the uses for which it is intended; & by consulting the plan which I sent you. The plank for the...
I write to you this week, more for the sake of letting you know that your l⟨e⟩tter of the 25th Ulto with the reports, came safe, than because I have any thing to communicate that is in any degree material. I have no doubt of Ceder making a good hedge—but I have very great ones of your getting them to live, when transplanted; and if they should not, your labour as well as the plants will be...
Since my last to you was dispatched, I have received your letters of the 30th of Novr and 4th inst. I am sorry to hear that your Wheat begins to heat. If it does this in a degree to do it much injury, it ought to be disposed of for the best price you can get; but otherwise, as I have waited so long to grind it, & shall have occasion for the Bran, I had rather Manufacture it myself. It is a...
Having received neither the weekly reports nor a letter from you yesterday, as usual, I fear you are unwell, or something else is the cause of it, as I got other letters by the Southern Mail. Flour keeps up to 13½ dollars pr barl. If I have any therefore on hand, to dispose of, I wish it were sold at that price, on a reasonable credit; allowing for the freight to this place; which is all that...
Your letter of the 24th Ulto has been received, and I am sorry to find by it that the drought still continued with you. On this day week there was a very good rain here, and on wednesday following a great deal fell; but the weather has been windy, cold and disagreeable ever since: notwithstanding which, the Grain and grass in these parts look extremely well. I am glad to find that you were, at...
Your letter of the 31st ulto with the Reports, I have received. A few days ago I received a letter from Mr Pyne dated in the City of Washington still expressing a desire to be employed at Mount Vernon, and a wish to be there some short time before Butler left it, that he might get a little insight into the nature of the business, previous to his entering upon duty. I referred him for his being...
The day before I left home, I rode by the field at Dogue run called Davy’s field—and intended to have had some further conversation with you on the subject of a second wheat field at that place this seeding time; but the suddenness of my departure prevented it. In looking at the field above mentioned, it did not strike me as sufficient, in addition to No. 5 for a wheaten crop at that farm (if...
Owing to the bad weather, and the sickness on the road of both Washington and one of the Postilions (Joe) I am no farther advanced yet; & do not expect to reach Philadelphia at soonest, before tuesday afternoon. As my Wheat would be a heavy loss to me, if the Weavil should get much into it; I must again request that no time may be lost in getting it out of the straw, and ground up as fast as...
Yesterday brought me your letter, & the Reports of the preceeding week; the first dated the 16th instt & the other the 12th. Frequent Rains at this season, if they do not fall too heavily, nor are of too long a continuance, will be the making of the Corn & Buckwheat; but if they are of such a nature as to prevent plowing it will be bad; however, it may so happen, that if you cannot plow in one...