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Since your illness at Georgetown I have heard nothing of you, only that you had so far recovered as to proceed, until yesterday, when a gentleman from Alexandria told me that you had taken your seat in Congress. This information gave me pleasure, as it seemed to communicate your complete recovery, as well as because it assured me that you was executing your duty at a time which seems big with...
I flatter’d myself I shod. have been able by this, to have remitted you my proportion of the balance due Mr. Taylor for the land we bought of him—but my endeavors have been ineffectual, nor do any prospects that I have, warrant a hope, I shall be able to command it, within any short period of time. Thus circumstanc’d it wod. be more agreeable to me to disengage myself from the contract....
In George Town and Alexa. your discrimination has, as it is said, few advocates. Dr. Stuart was my author concerning the opinions of the latter, Mr. Brook Beall concerning those of the former. But I collected afterward, from Mr. Laurence Washington, that Colo. Geo. Mason was strenuously in favor of your motion; and indeed what I recollect of his observations in convention coincides with this...
After a fatiguing journey we arrived here on sunday evening, when I found all my family well, except my wife, who, I fear, is incumbered with a dead fœtus of more than seven months old. I am endeavouring to ward off by medical aid the consequences of this event. She is now in good spirits, and therefore I trust, that the mischief will not be fatal. Yesterday I saw Colo. Innes. He informs us,...
I once knew a Swedish Clergyman in this city, who told me that when he preached in the Country, he always studied his Congregation first , and Afterwards his sermon. Something like this Should be done by legislators. They should perfectly understand the character of the people whom they represent, and Afterwards suit their laws to their habits and principles. I suspect the present Congress...
As there is like to be business for some Person (in Our Destrict) under the fœderal Governmt. I am induced to solicet your Interest in my favr. if there should be a call for a man to Collect the excise or duties, in my County, or District, or to fill any Post of Profett. As you are not acquainted with me you may know by application to some of my County men. If security shoud. be Required I...
Before I left home, Col Lee being about to depart for Congress, I wrote you by him. Since my arival here I got your letr. of the 1st. March, & have had an opportunity of reading your debates in Congress. Your motion which underwent so much discussion & met with such a decided negative is pleasing to the landed interest in this Country, & very much disrelished by the town interest. It is...
I am now to acknowledge with many thanks your favour of the 31 January. The hope of collecting some thing worthy communicating has prevented my writing earlier but I fear shoud I let this rule govern there woud be an end to our correspondence; sure I am I shoud not hear from you as often as I wish. I[n] this place where most persons are dealers in public securities your plan for a...
When I came home, I found my family in a really deplorable condition. Not to mention my children, most of whom were sick, the situation of my wife was very alarming. She gave every symptom of a painful and dangerous abortion being at hand. It is now a fortnight since she was first confined to her room, and every appearance grows more and more critical. It is almost certain, that the fœtus, now...
Letter not found. 15 March 1790. The list probably kept by Peter Force (DLC: Madison Miscellany) notes that the letter consisted of two pages and calendars it as follows: “Hamilton’s plan. Mr. Pendleton’s criticisms thereon.”
The governor has reason to expect the death of Colo. Grayson in a short time; and therefore requested Mr. Wm. Nelson to know from me, what you wished, in a case of a vacancy in the senate. I have just written to him, expressing your decided negative. I was diverted yesterday by Mr. John Pierce of James City (the delegate) asking whether you had not become a methodist . After I had recovered...
I am sorry to find that the Rhode Island Convention have adjourned without determining in favor of the Constitution. This conduct is however so far favorable as it may be deemed a proof that they are not violently bent against it. The general causes of the conduct of that State are perfectly well understood, but I wish much to know as far as you have collected them and are at liberty to...
Il latore della presente sarà il Sigr: Conte Paolo Andreani, di Milano, che vi raccomando particolarmente. Voi sapete ch’io sono piuttosto scrupoloso che facile a dar lettere di raccomandazione; onde non avete bisogno ch’io vi prevenga sul suo merito, che ben presto distinguerete da voi medesimo. Tra i suoi studi la Fisica e l’Istoria Naturale sono i più favoriti. Ve lo dico, affinchè sappiate...
My dear wife is not better, than when I wrote to you last. I expect something determinate in a few days. Inclosed is a copy of my motion. Had it been intended to bring forward a convention immediately, the thing was imprudently worded; because it contains many unpopular points. But as subjects of reflection for the people, they could not, I thought, be too pointed. I give you a duplicate, that...
Your Letter of the 28. feby. gave me the disagreeable Information of your infirm Health; which I can now, rather earnestly wish than very confidently hope is perfectly restored. Your sedentary Duty is not less adverse to Health, than the pressure of your mind from the magnitude of the objects that engage it, to Say nothing of their Complexion. The latter appears not quite satisfactory to the...
There are a great number of small ballance’s due to the Soldiers and officers of this and the North Carolina line which has been drawn by the pay master Genl and still remains in his hands to the Amount as I am inform’d of thirty thousand dollars. There is now in this State a man from newyork by the name of Renolds purchaseing these ballances at the rate of 3/ in the pound he was in this town,...
I have avoided opening my usual correspondence with you from a conviction in my own mind that any communications I could make would be uninteresting to you and occasion a waste of your time that might be otherwise more usefully employed in prosecuting your labours in the public service, more especially as I take it for granted Mr. Fenno gives us a pretty authentic detail of the proceedings in...
Upon coming to Town last ev’ning I had the pleasure to receive your several favors of the 10th. 14. & 16 Inst. and am made happy by the freindly manner in which you received my remarks upon your proposition—they were dictated indeed by my own sincerity, and a confidence, not only in the purity of the motive which founded the proposition, but also in your wishes on every occasion to obtain the...
I forgot to take your final opinion last night as to the mode of conveying official communications from the states through the channel of the President to the two federal houses . Whether it will be best to do it 1. by message from the presidt. through mr. Lear? 2. by do. through Th: J. appearing personally? 3 by do. through do. by way of letter? Be so good as to say what you think. I must be...
I recd. your favor of the 28th. instant by yesterdays post. I find the idea of a landed fund for the encouragement of manufactures is an old one in my mind. On looking over the little address to the frds of Manufactures in 1787 I observe I have hinted it there. You will excuse me therefore, if I wish not to part with it sooner than can be avoided. An infringement of the constitution is a...
I know your Time is so much occupied that unless on some very important Occasion it ought not to be interrupted. I send you a Pamphlet given to me by a Member of our House Mr Herman Husbands. As he reprobates the System of Finance it will not be the less pleasing to you on that Account. Having drawn the Principles of the federal Government from higher Sources than we ever thought of he must be...
Letter not found. April 1790. Mentioned in JM to James Madison, Sr., 2 May 1790 . Reports improving health of Nelly Conway Madison.
I will thank you to inform me whether it is likely that any thing will be done this session of Congress for establishing the emoluments of the Marshals office. This becomes an interesting question to those who must from duty be in Situations to incur expense, or hazard a neglect of duty by remaining where it will not be expensive. There was a temporary provision made at the last session by a...
Letter not found. 2 April 1790. La Forest was the French vice-consul in New York. Calendared on the list probably kept by Peter Force (DLC: Madison Miscellany).
Letter not found. 2 April 1790. Acknowledged in JM to Pendleton, 13 Apr. 1790 . The list probably kept by Peter Force (DLC: Madison Miscellany) notes that the letter consisted of one page and calendars it as follows: “Further objections to Hamilton’s plan. The progress of liberty in Europe.”
I am induced to address you on a subject which violates the rule I had lately prescribed to myself with respect to our public affairs. A youth the son of Mr. Thomas L. Lee to whom I beleive you was intimately known met me this morning on the road. Bred to the mercantile line in one of the most respectable houses in our country & cut off from his expectations there, by the death of his...
I have the pleasure to enclose you a further consideration of the affairs of R. Island —and two of the papers of which I sent the origls. to Col. H. You will see they will be objects of treaty & consequently must require to be reserved. That which relates to our Navigation is comprized in sixty pages & I have not any person to copy it at this time. In haste yr. respectful & obedt. Servt. RC...
I have seen the decision of the House of R. upon the Quaker Memorial, nearly I suppose as the Committee reported. From the lengthy debates however and the Matter of these debates, I had been led to suppose it possible at least that the report was a different one asserting something like a power in Congress to meddle with emancipation. The very circumstance of such a subject being taken up in...
Yr. Favor of february tenth did not reach me untill yesterday having been from home six weeks during which I have suffered extremely with a pleurisy—& afterwards the Gout—or rather a flying Gout. I am thank heaven now almost recover’d. Small breaches in Laws are precedents which will be drawn in point in favor of larger & more important ones—and a Government subject to the will only of those...
I congratulate you upon the prospect of the funding System being delayed ’till the next session of Congress. I hope an election will intervene, before you meet again. Should this be the case, I think it probable that no One of our members who has voted against your motion, & in favor of the leading principles of Mr Hamilton’s report will be reelected. I have long deplored the temporary...
Accept my thanks for your letter of the 20th. uto. which I have recievd. By the death of our very worthy friend Colo Grayson it became the duty of the Executive to appoint some person to fill the vacancy in the Senate. Application was made to Mr. Henry and on his refusal to serve Colo Mason was unanimously appointed—he also declind and then Mr. John Walker was chosen—who I presume will be in...
Abstract. 17 April 1790. Acknowledges JM’s payment of “Three Guineas being One Half of the Subscription” for prints depicting the Battle of Bunker Hill and the death of General Montgomery. Printed receipt ( DLC : Broadsides and miscellaneous nonbroadsides). Signed by Trumbull. On this same day, Jefferson gave Trumbull six guineas for two sets of the prints published in London on 10 Nov. 1788 (...
Yours of the 10th. I receiv’d. Mr. Reynolds is now on his way to Newyork from what he inform’d me his partner got the Lists from a Clerk of the Treasury. Since I wrote you he receve’d some other Lists amounting to 3000 dollars due to the offi[c]ers of this state. The person that he corresponds with from this place and remits the Soldiers powers of Attorney to is William J. Vriedenburg No. 40...
I am further Obliged by your Favr. of the 4th. & two Packets of papers accompanying it. I congratulate you on having that ill-judged & improper measure of Assuming the State debts, ’ere this determined; & tho’ a large Majority on so important a Subject, was desirable, yet I shall be glad to hear it is finally negatived even by a decis[i]on from the Chair. It has fix’d a Suspicion of a...
I got here last night from a trip to the great falls, & met your letr. of the 4th. It is really lamentable publicly & privately that a gift of Nature so useful should be locked up for the want of 3000 £ this currency. Was I in possession I verily beleive that the money would be returned in the course of one year. Col. Bull formerly of Pensylvania now of Berkeley, who was with me yesterday, &...
… [Encloses a pamphlet with the request] that you would not suffer it to go out of your hands without guarding against the possibility of its finding its way into a newspaper.… I shall next week send four or five copies of it to Mr. Jefferson. [Also encloses] Dr. Price’s Sermon preached before the Revolution Society in London.… It suggested to me an idea of your house addressing the national...
I reced the pleasure of your letter, and am greatly Obliged for your Sentiments on the Assumption of the State Debts. If it could be justly done, it would greatly contribute to the establishment of the Fœderal Government. The N E & S W parts of our Empire are not like to Assimalate, and Should the Devil bring about a dissolution—The N Englanders have such a Coasting Trade that Their imposts...
The act of the present Congress to prevent the exportation of goods not duly inspected, according to the laws of the several States, although it secures the execution of the state inspection laws, will not, I fear, procure to the States every benefit, which might be derived from it. By the Constitution of the United States, the several States are Authorized to lay such duties upon Exports as...
I have been looking most anxiously for the second communication, which you promised me, as soon as you should have had an interview with the President. Many times have I endeavoured to break in an easy way to my wife the necessity of my return to N. Y; in order to try her spirits, should I go off. As often has she been thrown into an agitation of real agony. Prepared as I am, I would have...
If the weather will permit, & Mr Madison’s health suffer him to go out to day, the Presdt. would be glad if he would give him a call before he goes to the House. Tr ( MH : Sparks Transcripts).
I have this moment come to Town and am favored with yours of the 10th. & 17th. Instant for which I beg you to accept my thanks. I am exceedingly happy in the majority having shifted sides upon the subject of the assumption of the State debts because I am certain that no measure could be carried in Congress more productive of discontent; nor do I think that any could be taken under...
I am sorry to be troublesome to you, but upon further examination of the Census Act, it appears to me that the penalties under which alone the people are compellable to render their returns truly, are without any practicable means of recovery: this will render them intirely nugatory unless a remedy is applied before the commencement of the business: as this Act Stands, together with that of...
Your favor of the 27th. of Feby. is now before me. The last act of the Virginia assembly on the subject of a seperation seems to have given general satisfaction. The opposition to that measure still continues but as far as I can hear the bulk of the people are in favor of it. Spain takes great pains to seduce our people to remove to their country. I have myself seen letters from the Governor...
As I know you lodge at Mrs. Ellsworths I take the liberty of troubling you wth. a request that you will oblige me so far as to engage a chamber for me in her house. And if possible one exposed to the South tho it should be in the upper story. I expect to leave Philadelphia for my fathers seat to Morrow, and shall return my sulkey from thence and proceed in the Stage so as to reach New York on...
Your proposition for doing justice to the late Army of the United States becomes both popular & practicable in proportion as it is contemplated. Many people are Converts to it, who at first considered it as impracticable & impolitic. Among these I have reason to believe is A Gentleman from South Carolina who bore a decided part in the Opposition to you on the floor of Congress. He is a...
I have the Honour to acknowlege the receipt of yours, of the 27th. Ultimo. Upon inquiring into the subject of the 4 months pay and Subsistence due to the officers and soldiers of the Virginia line, I am informed that the privates are not possessed, of any evidences of their Claims. The officers, have received warrants for the pay but have no acknowledgement from the public, for the subsistence...
As the Virginia commissioner charged with settling the state’s accounts with the Union, William Davies had been in New York since early 1789 arranging and presenting vouchers and other evidence of the Virginia expenditures during the war. In conducting this business the commissioner worked closely with the Virginia delegation in Congress, particularly with JM, who was “zealous on this subject”...
I am informed that Capt. Twining has a Memorial before Congress. Permit me to inform you that I have reason to beleive that the Setting up a line of Stages from Suffolk to Savannah for the purpose of transporting the Public Mail was the principal Cause of his ruin & I know that his family is now in Great distress. Any Service that you can render him will lay an Obligation on Dr Sir Yr. Mo....
I recd. your Favr. by Mr Randolph and shd. sooner have written to you, but that I waited for his Departure. I wished to congratulate you on a Motion made by yourself some Time past, which tho’ unsuccessful, in my opinion, does equal Credit to the Head & to the Heart: and I beleive, there are very few indeed, unconnected with the Business of Certificates, who think otherwise. The...
Your favour to Mr. Page, of the 27th Ulto. came to that Gentlemans hands as early as might be—but a Negociation being then on Hand between the Trustees of the Fredericksbg Academy and a Gentleman of Massachusets, who had undertaken to fill the vacant Professorship in our Academy on certain terms we cou’d not decide as to the Gent: mentioned by your Friend Doctor Johnston untill we shou’d hear...