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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Madison, James" AND Period="Washington Presidency"
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I was so much fatigued with the trip in the stage, as to be rendered utterly unqualified to proceed on my journey before the day before yesterday, when I got something better; I should have been more unhappy than my state of health would have made me, if I had not been informed here that Mrs. Grayson was greatly recovered. The visits which I have recieved & the Company I have kept have served...
I am this moment labouring under a violent relapse into the ague and fever, which I supposed to be past; and should not [have] incurred the uneasiness of writing, but to convince you, that the arrangements, made in the higher and subordinate branches of the judiciary department, are sanctified in my judgment by the strictest propriety; and, so far as I am concerned, contain what is probably...
I thank you My Dear Sir for the line you was so obliging as to leave for me and for the loan of the book accompanying it; in which I have not yet made sufficient progress to judge of its merit. I dont know how it was but I took it for granted—That you had left town much earlier than you did; else I should have found an opportunity after your adjournment to converse with you on the subjects...
The post with the letters brought by the British Packet passed me at Brunswick, on saturday morning at five o clock, so that you would receive every information brought by that conveyance the same evening. I went to Lloyds house on saturday afternoon, he was not at home, I left a note for him informing what I wanted, he called on me yesterday & said he had sent the paper you wished by a Mr...
Agreable to your request I called on Mr. Taylor, on the subject of your letter of the 5th Ult. He informed me that he had called twice at Mr Cortwrights but had not been able to see Mr Munro. That he is ready to execute a deed for the lands in question on the payment of the remainder of the money. He is a man of strict probity, and informs me that the lands will now sell for at least 2½...
My excursions during the sickly season deprived me of the pleasure of continuing our correspondence which should have been sooner resumed on my part after my return had I not expected on the adjournment of congress you wod. have left N. York—but hearing you were not returned to Virginia I take occasion by Mr. Griffin to drop you a few lines. The Assembly are as usual moving slowly in the...
Mr. Reuben Burnley, having been for some time past, a Clerk in the Commissioners Office for stating the Accounts of Virginia against the United States, is desirous of continuing at the seat of the general Government after the business in which he is at present engaged, is completed, and to be employed in the Office of the Secretary of State, should Mr. Jefferson accept the appointment. As that...
Your favor dated in July came safe to hand, I thank you for the communications contained [in] it. I shall not trouble you with any remarks on any of the subjects as my observations will be of no use but will confine my self to the giving you such information respecting this district as may enable you to form a proper judgment of her situation; and as I shall never write any thing to you the...
Letter not found. 13 November 1789, Havre de Grace, France. Mentioned in JM to James Madison, Sr., 21 Jan. 1790 (IaU) and JM to Jefferson, 24 Jan. 1790 ( Boyd, Papers of Jefferson Julian P. Boyd et al., eds., The Papers of Thomas Jefferson (19 vols. to date; Princeton, 1950—). , XVI, 126). Reports scarcity of bread and prices of wheat and flour. French government is offering bounty on wheat,...
Your favor from Fredericksburgh, covering a letter for Mr. Jefferson came to hand & I will either deliver it or leave it in the office of foreign affairs, in case of absence, which may probably happen, as I am informed the County in which I live have elected me for the State Convention, which is to meet at Philadelphia on tuesday week. The inclosed was sent to me yesterday from the office of...
I recieved some time ago by Mr. James the letter of introduction you had given him for me. I hope I need not tell you how readily I am disposed at all times to do whatever may be agreeable to you—& particularly with how much pleasure I should have rendered any services in my power to Mr. James, had he remained here—the confusion & disorder which prevailed in Paris during the few days of his...
Captain Bunyan arrived here this morning from London in 29 days. A Mr Trumbull came passenger—they are now at Brakefast with us. They say that Mr. Jefferson sailed from Cowes, on the same day they did, in a Ship bound for Norfolk in Virginia. Unless he has a remarkable passage indeed, this information may be the first you can receive of his destination—which is my motive for giving you this...
Mr. Burnley will convey this letr. by some one of the many of your county people now here with their tobacco. In it you will receive a letr. sent to me from Alexa. by Mr C Lee on the presumption that you was or would be here. The assembly have gone thro most of their business, & are now engaged in consideration of the amendments proposed by Congress, to the constitution. Some time ago Mr....
A few days ago I wrote a letter to Majr. Madison giving him some information on the general business of the present Session, which I suppose he has probably communicated to you. I now take the liberty of obtruding on you a short communication on the same subject. The revenue bill which proposes a reduction of the public taxes one fourth below the last year’s amount is with the Senate. Whilst...
A few days since I received a Letter from Mr. Jefferson, dated at Cowes in the Isle of Wight the 17th. October last, in which he mentioned that he expected to sail from that Place the next Day in a Vessel bound to the Chesapeake, and enclosed a Bill of Lading, a Copy of which I have the Pleasure of herewith sending to you. In case the Packages mentioned in the said Bill of Lading, arrive...
Since the date of my letter to you which I wrote a few days ago the resolutions of the Committee on the amendments proposed by Congress have been reported. Those which respected the ten first were agreed to with even less opposition than they experienced in the Committee, & that wh. passed on the 11th & 12th. was rescinded by a majority of about twelve. The amendments with the resolutions on...
I take the liberty of forwarding to you two resolutions which have pass’d both houses, on the subject of the permanent seat of the General Goverment. To the first of these there was considerable opposition from the South side of James river, under an apprehension that it woud not be advantageous to that part of the State; and from some of the Antis who considerd it as a favour to Congress—they...
I have not until very lately known with certainty where I could address a letter to you. Mr. Beckley told me he left you in New York and that you was shortly to set out for Virginia, but Mr. Jones’s return to Richmond from his trip to Orange gave me the first information of your having got home. But for this uncertainty I should before now have made you my most grateful acknowledgments for...
Colo. Heth has at length brought the Money, and taken up your dr[a]ft for £100. which enables me to transmit your Bond, and the Auditor’s receipt. It will ever give me satisfaction to serve you, being with very great esteem & regard, Dear Sir Your obedt Servt Know all men by these presents that I, James Madison Junior of the County of Orange in Virginia, am held and firmly bound to his...
I take the liberty to inclose you a copy of a rect. given me by Mr. John Hopkins for ticketts deld. him in order that he might draw money or Certificates for the prizes which I am entitled to recieve havg. bought the Ticketts of Mr. Massie. Mr Hopkins deld. the Ticketts to Mr. Rd. Claibourne who sed he would do the business but fail’d and has gone to Europe and carryed my Ticketts so that I...
In pursuance of the Directions of the General Assembly, I do myself the honour to transmit to you an Act—Concerning the erection of the district of Kentucky into an Independant State. I have the Honour &c. FC ( Executive Letter Book Executive Letter Book, manuscript in Virginia State Library. ). Addressed to the Virginia representatives and senators in Congress. In a clerk’s hand. Enclosure...
I wrote the inclosed letter to you a little before I left Paris, & having no occasion to send it, I brought it with me. I mentioned it to you when I had the happiness of possessing you at Monticello, but still forgot to give it to you. After so long lying by me, and further turning the subject in my mind, I find no occasion to alter my mind. I hazard it therefore to your consideration. I...
I beg leave to recommend to your favorable notice Mr. Francis Bailey, printer, of this City, as a Gentleman of abilities in his profession and an amiable Character. I understand he intends to apply for something in the way of his business, either to the Treasury or elswhere. His mechanical Genius must in some respects give him advantages superior to any other printer of my Acquaintance. He...
An opportunity occurring to a post office—enables me to consign a few lines to you—to assure you that I am still sensible of the obligations that Myself my posterity & my fellow citizens are under to you—who have devoted Your life hitherto to the formation of such measures as tend to the promotion of general happiness. I was not a little disappointed that you did not visit Richmond during the...
Letter not found. Ca. 20 January 1790. Acknowledged in JM to Pendleton, 4 Mar. 1790 . Recommends Dr. David Morrow for a federal appointment.
If Mr. Madison should be disengaged this Evening Mr. Hamilton would be obliged by an opportunity of conversing with him at his lodgings for half an hour. If engaged this Evening he will thank him to say whether tomorrow Evening will suit. RC ( DLC ). Addressed by Hamilton.
I did myself the pleasure to write you and enclosed the £100. Bond cancelled—with the Auditor’s Receipt in full discharge thereof. I hope the letter arrived safe. It will give us all here very great satisfaction to hear you are perfectly recovered. I am Dear Sir With very great esteem & regard Your obedt Servt The enclosed failed to reach Mr. Page before he left home; will you do me the favor...
I beg leave to make known to you the bearer Docr. Morrow. He was early engaged in the service of the U States as a naval surgeon. He continued in this employment thro various vicissitudes, suffering extreme hardships, & acquitted himself with honor & reputation. He understands that naval hospitals will be established & wishes to resume his old employment. His knowledge, his amiability of...
I must beg leave to request the favor of you to write to me, soon as convenient, in respect to the business you were good enough to undertake to transact for me in Congress. Should you be at a loss for any information relative to the matter, I shall be obliged to you to apply to the President, who is acquainted with every circumstance: Or if it be necessary for me to attend in New York, you...
The information required by the inclosed resolution of the General Assembly to be laid before Congress will be forwarded to you by mr. Matthew Anderson a Merchant of Character. I have taken the liberty to address these papers to your care as I supposed there was not a more proper channel through which they could be presented to the View of the fœderal Legislature. I should have written upon...
The Secretary of the Treasury has wrote the Officers of this Port, for the exact Sum, each Officer has received, up to the first of January. I hope the Secretary is of Opinion that our Fees are too small and that he will lay a Statement thereof before Congress, for Their Consideration. I have estimated on a frugal Plan the Sum I must expend for the Support of my Family, and find it will...
Latitude Note These Longitudes though sufficiently correct for common Geographical purposes, will nevertheless be rendered more accurate, when the Meridional Tangent to the west end of Lake Ontario, is carried on to the north boundary of Pennsylvania. Longitude, from the Meridian of Philadelphia °  ′  ″  °  ′  ″  Fort Erie 48.. 53.. 17 N 3.. 39..
I am favored with yours of the 24. Ult. and am much releived by it from apprehensions that your indisposition, of which I had heard by several hands, was of so serious a Nature, as, at least to detain you on the way longer than it has. I hope you have perfectly recovered. I thank you for your remarks upon my appointment under the fedl Govt. I shall never pretend to an intire indifference upon...
I have had Such advantage from our past correspondence, as to make it my Interest and Inclination to acknowledge it, and at the Same time to assure you of the pleasure I shall take in the renewal of it, So far as is perfectly convenient to you. We have as yet heard very little of the proceedings of your present Session, tho we doubt not that the most interesting Subjects will Come under yr....
In obedience to the command of the President of the United States, I have the honor to enclose you a letter from Peyton Short Esquire resigning his Commission of Collector of the Port of Louisville in Kentuckey, and to request that you will be so good as to consult with Mr. Brown, and any other Gentlemen from Virginia who are acquainted with characters in that part of the Country, upon a...
Pardon the liberty I take in addressing myself to you, who I have not the Honor to be Known to. My presuming on this freedom, is as much from the severity of my present unhappy Situation, as from a persuasion, that you are a Gentleman of Humanity who can make allowances for improprieties, which are the Offspring of Necessity and real distress: The World sir has severely frown’d upon me, and...
Since my Respects of 6 October, I have your favor of 21 June by Mr James, who did not come here, but sent it from London. I should have been happy to have attended to him had he passed this way. It is not in my power by this opportunity to hand you Sales of your Tobaccoes by the Venus and Cyrus—this last named Consignment is under considerable Inconvenience & disadvantage for having been...
I received your favor of Jan. 24. the day before yesterday; the President’s of the 21st. was 16 days getting to my hands. I write him by this occasion my acceptance, and shall endeavor to subdue the reluctance I have to that office which has increased so as to oppress me extremely. The President pressed my coming on immediately, and I have only said to him in general that circumstances,...
I take the liberty to ask your attention to that part of the domestic debt which is registered in the name of foreigners. There are circumstances attending this portion of the debt which, in addition to the usual obligations of justice, give peculiar force & solemnity to the demands of present holders of the Certificates. It should be observed that the first transfers of the domestic debt to...
I have taken the liberty of inclosing you copies of a number of letters I have written to a friend in Congress published at his request relating to the important subject of finance now before that honorable body. The practicability of effecting a separate provision for original holders, I am well convinced of. I have carried into effect a similar plan in Penna. adopted by the Legislature with...
I expected that the establishment of the federal Goverment, and the reformation of the Constitution of Pennsylvania would have gratified all my wishes for the prosperity of my Country, and have left me to enjoy in private life the pleasures of science and professional pursuits. But I find I cannot be an indifferent Spectator of the great Question which now agitates your house. It involves in...
I have taken the Liberty of requesting the favour of you to transact an affair of the greatest consequence to my poor Brother George’s Estate, his Acct with united States as an Officer of the 3d Regiment of Light Dragoon, is yet unsettled, a Statement of which by Capt: Barret one of his officers and also his Deposition respecting the Accts: are in Mr. Pearce’s office, or with the Commissioners...
You’ll be pleasd to accept my thanks for your favour of the 31st ulto which I recievd in due time. I am by no means astonishd at the reports of the two Secretaries given rise to a variety of opinions. The subjects to which they refer are both incricate [ sic ], and the interest of different persons will induce them to adopt various opinions. Mr. Hamilton’s plan, altho it discovers knowledge &...
With this letter you will receive a Pamphlet, you was so obliging as to lend me, & which from inadvertency I never returned. I was much surprised on opening my things here to find it among them. I congratulate you most heartily on the facility you are likely to meet with in the various objects of the Legislature. It was always my opinion that you might be bolder, particularly in your...
In answer to your polite letter, I have only to repeat my congratulations to you for the honor you have done to the claims of justice and patriotism by your motion. The small number of the minority that rose to support it, does not lessen its merit. The decision upon that great Question will leave a stain upon our Country which no time nor declammation can ever wipe away. History will decide...
I return Mr. Jefferson’s letter with thanks for the perusal of it. I am glad he has resolved to accept the Appointment of Secretary of State, but sorry it is so repugnant to his own inclinations that it is done. Sincerely & Affectly. I am—Yrs. RC ( NjP ); Tr ( MH : Sparks Transcripts). RC addressed by Washington; docketed by JM late in life: “G. Washington—no date / 1789–90.” For dating of the...
I am informed that a vacancy has happened in the Supreme Court for the Western Territory, which perhaps may not be yet fill’d. I am strongly press’d by my Freinds in the Western Country to solicit the appointment which I confess wou’d be highly agreeable to me. The vacancy I mean is in consequence of the death of General Parsons. If my pretensions shou’d meet your Approbation—your kind offices...
Upon coming to Town a few days ago I had the pleasure to receive yrs. of the 2d. & 14th. Ult. From Colo. Innes I have also had the perusal of the reports of the Secretaries of the Treasury and War departments. I have not as yet been able to give either so thorough an examination as to enable me to give a decided opinion upon it—the former indeed is extensive and complicated; it also takes up...
We arrived last night after much fatigue to ourselves and horses. Indeed I have not been free from a fever since Wednesday last. From the small opporty., which I had, to ascertain the opinion of Phila. on the subject of your motion, I am inclined to believe, that if the holders of securities, the merchants and others, associated with them, or dependent on them, were excluded, the suffrage...
We were Sorry to hear of your being taken ill at George Town, but rejoiced to see you Correcting the Schedule of the Census at New york. Mr Hamilton has discoverd great extent of Comprehension in his Report. He with great facility develops and simplifies the most Complicated Subjects. The funding the debts of the Individual States with the Others, is a masterly Stroke of Policy, and will...