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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Madison, James" AND Period="Washington Presidency"
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Since your illness at Georgetown I have heard nothing of you, only that you had so far recovered as to proceed, until yesterday, when a gentleman from Alexandria told me that you had taken your seat in Congress. This information gave me pleasure, as it seemed to communicate your complete recovery, as well as because it assured me that you was executing your duty at a time which seems big with...
I flatter’d myself I shod. have been able by this, to have remitted you my proportion of the balance due Mr. Taylor for the land we bought of him—but my endeavors have been ineffectual, nor do any prospects that I have, warrant a hope, I shall be able to command it, within any short period of time. Thus circumstanc’d it wod. be more agreeable to me to disengage myself from the contract....
In George Town and Alexa. your discrimination has, as it is said, few advocates. Dr. Stuart was my author concerning the opinions of the latter, Mr. Brook Beall concerning those of the former. But I collected afterward, from Mr. Laurence Washington, that Colo. Geo. Mason was strenuously in favor of your motion; and indeed what I recollect of his observations in convention coincides with this...
After a fatiguing journey we arrived here on sunday evening, when I found all my family well, except my wife, who, I fear, is incumbered with a dead fœtus of more than seven months old. I am endeavouring to ward off by medical aid the consequences of this event. She is now in good spirits, and therefore I trust, that the mischief will not be fatal. Yesterday I saw Colo. Innes. He informs us,...
I once knew a Swedish Clergyman in this city, who told me that when he preached in the Country, he always studied his Congregation first , and Afterwards his sermon. Something like this Should be done by legislators. They should perfectly understand the character of the people whom they represent, and Afterwards suit their laws to their habits and principles. I suspect the present Congress...
As there is like to be business for some Person (in Our Destrict) under the fœderal Governmt. I am induced to solicet your Interest in my favr. if there should be a call for a man to Collect the excise or duties, in my County, or District, or to fill any Post of Profett. As you are not acquainted with me you may know by application to some of my County men. If security shoud. be Required I...
Before I left home, Col Lee being about to depart for Congress, I wrote you by him. Since my arival here I got your letr. of the 1st. March, & have had an opportunity of reading your debates in Congress. Your motion which underwent so much discussion & met with such a decided negative is pleasing to the landed interest in this Country, & very much disrelished by the town interest. It is...
I am now to acknowledge with many thanks your favour of the 31 January. The hope of collecting some thing worthy communicating has prevented my writing earlier but I fear shoud I let this rule govern there woud be an end to our correspondence; sure I am I shoud not hear from you as often as I wish. I[n] this place where most persons are dealers in public securities your plan for a...
When I came home, I found my family in a really deplorable condition. Not to mention my children, most of whom were sick, the situation of my wife was very alarming. She gave every symptom of a painful and dangerous abortion being at hand. It is now a fortnight since she was first confined to her room, and every appearance grows more and more critical. It is almost certain, that the fœtus, now...
Letter not found. 15 March 1790. The list probably kept by Peter Force (DLC: Madison Miscellany) notes that the letter consisted of two pages and calendars it as follows: “Hamilton’s plan. Mr. Pendleton’s criticisms thereon.”