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    • Washington, George
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    • Madison, James
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    • Washington Presidency

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Documents filtered by: Author="Washington, George" AND Recipient="Madison, James" AND Period="Washington Presidency"
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§ From George Washington. Ca. 1789–1796. Three notes requesting consultation with JM on unspecified matters: “Thursday, 9 oclk. “If you could make it convenient to call here before you go to the House, you would oblige me. I want to have some conversation with you on two or three matters. Yrs Affectly.” “Sunday ½ past 7 oclk. “If you have leisure to give the enclosed a reading, and me an...
Notwithstanding the conviction I am under of the labour which is imposed upon you by Public Individuals as well as public bodies—yet, as you have begun, so I could wish you to finish, the good work in a short reply to the Address of the House of Representatives (which I now enclose) that there may be an accordance in this business. Thursday 12 Oclock, I have appointed to receive the Address....
Notwithstanding the conviction I am under of the labour which is imposed upon you by Public Individuals as well as public bodies—Yet, as you have began, so I would wish you to finish, the good work in a short reply to the Address of the House of Representatives (which I now enclose) that there may be an accordance in this business. Thursday 12 O’clock, I have appointed to receive the Address....
The enclosed were communicated to me, as you will perceive, to make a confidential use of—upon receipt of the first letter, I expressed a desire to be informed (if there was nothing improper in it) through what channel the report came, and what reliance could be placed in the authenticity of it—This gave rise to the second letter —As you are upon business which requires every information of...
The enclosed were communicated to me (as you will perceive) to make a Confidential use of. Upon receipt of the first letter I expressed a desire to be informed (if there was nothing improper in it) through what channel the report came, and what reliance could be placed in the authenticity of it. This produced the sec’d letter. As you are upon business which requires every information of the...
To draw such a line for the conduct of the President as will please every body, I know is impossible; but to mark out and follow one (which by being consonant with reason) will meet general approbation, may be as practicable as it is desireable. The true medium I conceive must lye in pursuing such a course as will allow him time for all the official duties of his station—This should be the...
To draw such a line for the conduct of the President as will please every body, I know is impossible; but to mark out and follow one (which by being consonant with reason) will meet general approbation, may be as practicable as it is desireable. The true medium I conceive must lye in pursuing such a course as will allow him time for all the official duties of his station. This should be the...
Mr Madison having been so obliging as to draw the answer to the address of the House of Representatives—G.W. would thank him for doing the same to that of the Senate. If he receives it any time this day or tomorrow morning it will be sufficient. AL , DLC : Madison Papers. The date of this document is conjectural. Madison docketed the letter—apparently some years after the fact—“G. Washington...
Mr. Madison having been so obliging as to draw the answer to the Address of the House of Representatives—GW. would thank him for doing the same to that of the Senate. If he receives it any time this day or tomorrow morning it will be sufficient. RC ( DLC ); Tr ( MH ). Late in life JM docketed the RC : “G. Washington without date—(perhaps 1789,) 90 or 91.” Fitzpatrick ( Writings of Washington ,...
As far as a momentary consideration has enabled me to judge, I see nothing exceptionable in the proposed amendments. Some of them, in my opinion, are importantly necessary; others, though of themselves (in my conception) not very essential, are necessary to quiet the fears of some respectable characters and well meaning men. Upon the whole, therefore, not foreseeing any evil consequences that...