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My last to you was of the 15th. of March. I am now in hourly expectation of recieving my leave of absence. The delay of it a little longer will endanger the throwing my return into the winter, the very idea of which is horror itself to me. I am in hopes this is the last letter I shall have the pleasure of writing you before my departure. The madness of the king of England has gone off, but...
My last to you was of May 11. Yours of Mar. 29. came to hand ten days ago: and about two days ago I received a cover of your hand writing, under which was a N. York paper of May 4. & a letter from mr. Page to Mazzei. There being no letter from you makes me hope there is one on the way which will inform me of my Congé. I have never received mr. Jay’s answer to my public letter of Nov. 19. which...
My last to you was of the 18th. of June. Within a day or two after, yours of May 9. came to hand. In the rest of Europe nothing remarkeable has happened; but in France such events as will be for ever memorable in history. To begin where my last left them, the king took on himself to decide the great question of voting by persons or by orders, by a declaration made at a Seance royale on the...
I wrote you on the 22d. Since that I have received yours of the 23d. of May. The president’s title as proposed by the Senate was the most superlatively ridiculous thing I ever heard of. It is a proof the more of the justice of the character given by Doctr. Franklin of my friend [:] always an honest man often a great one but sometimes absolutely mad . I wish he could have been here during the...
My last to you was of July 29. Since that I have received yours of May 27. June 13. & 30. The tranquillity of the city has not been disturbed since my last. Dissensions between the French & Swiss guards occasioned some private combats in which five or six were killed. These dissensions are made up. The want of bread for some days past has greatly endangered the peace of the city. Some get a...
I sit down to write to you without knowing by what occasion I shall send my letter. I do it because a subject comes into my head which I would wish to develope a little more than is practicable in the hurry of the moment of making up general dispatches. The question Whether one generation of men has a right to bind another, seems never to have been started either on this or our side of the...
I have sent to Havre the following packages, with directions to send them by the first vessel to New York to your address. TI. No. 29. A box of books. These were packed before I took a list of them, therefore I cannot inform you of it’s contents. I believe the whole are for you; tho’ should it be otherwise the person’s name will always be found written on or in the book. TI. No. 33. TI. No....
I wrote the inclosed letter to you a little before I left Paris, & having no occasion to send it, I brought it with me. I mentioned it to you when I had the happiness of possessing you at Monticello, but still forgot to give it to you. After so long lying by me, and further turning the subject in my mind, I find no occasion to alter my mind. I hazard it therefore to your consideration. I...
I received your favor of Jan. 24. the day before yesterday; the President’s of the 21st. was 16 days getting to my hands. I write him by this occasion my acceptance, and shall endeavor to subdue the reluctance I have to that office which has increased so as to oppress me extremely. The President pressed my coming on immediately, and I have only said to him in general that circumstances,...
I forgot to take your final opinion last night as to the mode of conveying official communications from the states through the channel of the President to the two federal houses . Whether it will be best to do it 1. by message from the presidt. through mr. Lear? 2. by do. through Th: J. appearing personally? 3 by do. through do. by way of letter? Be so good as to say what you think. I must be...
Your servant now returns with many thanks for the aid of him & your horses. I was disappointed in meeting my family here: however I am told they will arrive today. I wished to have seen mr. Randolph, before the departure of your servant, to know if he had found a horse for me; because if he has not, I should determine to accept the offer of yours. I drove him about eight miles in the Phaeton,...
Mr. Randolph arrived last night without having been able to get me a horse, or even to hear of one which he could approve of. Presuming you had made up your mind as to parting with yours, I take the liberty of sending for him. I should not hesitate to take him at your own price but that I apprehend you think him of less than his real value, and therefore propose that you should have him...
I intended to have called last night & left with you the inclosed draught of a lre. to Otto but it was so cold I could not give up my hack. I recieved yours soon after I came home. Of the two constructions I observe you lean more to the 2d. and I more to the 1st. on account of the consequences to which the 2d may be pursued. My first idea was to write this lre. to Otto and previously...
Will you be so good as to let me know how much I am in your debt for travelling expences & the horse. My monstrous bill of freight rendered the question useless till now. I send you a moment’s amusement at my expence in the Connecticut paper. I suppose it is from some schoolmaster who does not like that the mysteries of his art should become useless. RC ( DLC ). Addressed by Jefferson....
It being impossible to entertain a doubt that the horse I bought of you was fairly sold, & fairly bought, that his disorder was of the instant, & might have happened years after as well as when it did, so as to exonerate you as is justly established, from all responsibility, I should as soon think of filching the sum from your pocket, as of permitting the loss to be yours. I therefore send you...
What say you to taking a wade into the country at noon? It will be pleasant above head at least. The party to finish by dining here. Information that Colo. Beckwith is coming to be an inmate with you, & I presume not a desireable one, encourages me to make a proposition, which I did not venture as long as you had your agreeable Congressional society about you, that is, to come & take a bed and...
Your favor of the 1st. came to hand on the 3d. Mr. Freneau has not followed it: I suppose therefore he has changed his mind back again, for which I am really sorry. I have now before me a huge bundle of letters, the only business between me & my departure. I think I can be through them by the end of the week, in which case I will be with you by Tuesday or Wednesday, if nothing new comes in to...
I arrived here on Sunday evening. Yesterday I sent your note to Lieper who immediately called & paid the 200 Dollars, which I have exchanged for a post note & now inclose. I mentioned to the Atty. Gen. that I had a note on him, & afterwards sent it to him, saying nothing as to time. I inclose you also a post note for 35. Dollars to make up my deficit of expences (25.94 D.) to pay mr. Elsworth...
Yours of the 23d. has been duly recieved. The parcel from the taylor will probably come safely by the stage. With respect to the edition of Hamilton More’s book I took pains to satisfy myself of the best edition when I was in a better situation than I now am, to do it with success. The result was that the 6th. edn. was the last published under the examination of the author, & that the...
I have duly recieved your favours of June 27. & July 1. The last came only this morning. I now return Colo. Smith’s map with my acknolegements for the pamphlet & sight of the map. I inclose you a 60. Dollar bill, & beg the favor of you to remit 30. Dollars with the inclosed letter to Prince, also, as I see Maple sugar, grained , advertised for sale at New York in boxes of 400 lb. each, if they...
Your indisposition at the date of your last, and hearing nothing from you since, make me fear it has continued. The object of the present is merely to know how you do, & from another hand, if you are not well enough. We have little new but what you will see in the public papers. You see there the swarm of anti-publicolas. The disavowal by a Printer only does not appear to satisfy. We have no...
Your favors of July 10. & 13. have been duly recieved and I now return the pamphlet inclosed in the latter, with thanks for the perusal. The author has the appearance of knowing better what has past in England than in America. As to the latter to be sure he has been ignorant enough. I am sincerely sorry that Freneau has declined coming here. Tho’ the printing business be sufficiently full...
Yours of the 21st. came to hand yesterday. I will keep my eye on the advertisements for Halifax. The time of my journey to Virginia is rendered doubtful by the incertainty whether the President goes there or not. It is rather thought he will not. If so, I shall go later & stay a shorter time. I presume I may set out about the beginning of September, & shall hope your company going & coming....
I inclose you the pamphlet desired in your’s of July 24. Also the one on Weights & measures recieved through you, of which having another copy, be pleased to keep it. In turning over some papers I came across my journal through France, & Italy, and fancied you might be willing to acquire of that country a knowlege at second hand which you refuse to acquire at the first. It is written in the...
I this moment recieve yours of the 26th. The sugar of which you inclose a sample would by no means answer my purpose, which was to send it to Monticello, in order, by a proof of it’s quality, to recommend attention to the tree to my neighbors. In my letter of yesterday I forgot to tell you there is a brig here to sail for Halif[a]x in 10. days. She is under repair, & therefore may possibly...
Your favours of July 31. & Aug. 1. are recieved, but not that of the 30th. which was trusted to a private hand. Having discovered on Friday evening only that I had not inclosed Coxe’s pamphlet, I sent it off immediately to the post office. However I suppose it did not leave this place till the post of Monday nor get to your hands till Tuesday evening. Colo. Lee is here still, & gives me hopes...
I have just now recieved your favor of the 16th. and tho late at night I scribble a line that it may go by the morning’s post. I inclose you two letters which have been awaiting you here several days. Also a copy of the census which I had made out for you. What is in red ink is conjectural, the rest from the real returns. The return of Virginia is come in this day, seven hundred & forty odd...
Will you come and sit an hour before dinner to-day? also take soup with me tomorrow? Since writing the above the President has been here, & left L’Enfant’s plan, with a wish that you & I would examine it together immediately, as to certain matters, & let him know the result. As the plan is very large, will you walk up & examine it here? RC ( DLC ). Addressed by Jefferson. Dated only “1792” in...
In my report on How’s case, where I state that it should go to the President, it will become a question with the house Whether they shall refer it to the President themselves, or give it back to the Petitioner, & let him so address it, as he ought to have done at first. I think the latter proper, 1. because it is a case belonging purely to the Executive. 2. The Legislature should never shew...
I received the inclosed late last night, and it is not in my power to see mr. H. this morning. If you can with satisfaction to yourself broach to him what Monroe proposes, well. If not, it must take it’s chance. You will have heard that upon the discussion of G. M.’s merits, the foreign business was postponed untill tomorrow, nothing having been done respecting the Hague. The order of...
Letter not found. Ca. 1 March 1792. Mentioned in JM to Jefferson, 5 Mar. 1792 . Concerns settlement of David Owings’s and David Woods’s Revolutionary War claims.
I inclose you my thoughts on a subject extremely difficult, and on which I would thank you for any observations. The exchange of criminals is so difficult between a free & an arbitrary government, that England never would consent to make a convention with any state on the subject. It has accordingly been hitherto the asylum of all fugitives from the oppressions of other governments. The...
I send you my ideas of what might be said on the distinction between bonds & simple contracts, if any thing should be said. But my office being to vindicate the opinions of the courts, and none of the courts having made any distinction between these two cases, I ought to tread in their footsteps only: and the rather as mr. Hammond has not raised any such distinction on his part. It would be...
I have just received a Northern hare , and have got from the market a common one. It may be worth your while to come half an hour before we go to E. R’s to examine their difference, as they must be skinned soon. RC ( DLC ). Conjectural date assigned on the basis of circumstances described in n. 1 and of JM’s departure from Philadelphia circa Sunday, 20 May 1792. Jefferson later presented a...
I sent you last week some of Fenno’s papers in which you will have seen it asserted impudently & boldly that the suggestions against members of Congress were mere falshoods. I now inclose his Wednesday’s paper. I send you also a copy of Hamilton’s notes. Finding that the letter would not be ready to be delivered before the Pr’s return, I made notes corresponding with his, shewing where I...
I wrote you the 1st. inst. which I will call No. 1. and number my letters in future that you may know when any are missing. Mr. Hammond has given me an answer in writing, saying that he must send my letter to his court & wait their instructions. On this I desired a personal interview that we might consider the matter together in a familiar way. He came accordingly yesterday and took a solo...
The poll of the N. Y. election stood the day before yesterday thus. Clinton Jay Suffolk 481 228. Queen’s cty. 532 288 King’s cty. 244 92 city & county of N. Y. 603 739 Orange 551. 80. Dutchess 751.
Nothing new. P. S. Opening Freneau’s p⟨aper⟩ this moment I see a peice against the […] impost duties & it mentions the insufficiency of the revenue cutters for their object. This suggests a Quere. How comes an armed force to be in existence, & under the revenue department, & not the department of war? Would it not be well to call for a separate statement of the expence of these cutters, and...
Your No. 1. came to hand two days ago. When I inclosed you the papers of the last week I was too much hurried to write. I now therefore write earlier, & inclose only one of Fenno’s papers. The residue of the New York election was as follows Clinton Jay Albany 444. 1178 Montgomy. 306. 424 Herkimer. 247. 401 Ontario.    28.    92 Total. 8,457. 8,315 difference 142
I wrote you last on the 21st. The present will cover Fenno of the 23d. & 27th. In the last you will discover Hamilton’s pen in defence of the bank, and daring to call the republican party a faction . I learn that he has expressed the strongest desire that Marshall should come into Congress from Richmond, declaring there is no man in Virginia whom he wishes so much to see there, and I am told...
No. 6. Since my last of June 29. I have received your Nos. 2. & 3. of June 24. & 25. The following particulars occur. Vining has declined offering at the next election. It is said we are to have in his room a mr. Roach, formerly of the army, an anti-cincinnatus, and good agricultural man. Smith of S. C. declines also. He has bought a fine house in Charleston for 5000. £ and had determined not...
I wrote you my No. 6. on the 3d inst. Since that I have received your No. 4. of June 29. The President sets out this afternoon, which being a day sooner than was expected, will enable me to set out a day sooner, to wit on Friday afternoon. This however will produce no other effect than to enable me to rest a day at George town and thereby ensure my being with you as I had mentioned on Saturday...
I wrote you two days ago but by a bungle of the servant it did not get to the post office in time. This serves to cover another paper. I set out this afternoon. Adieu. Your’s affectionately FC ( MHi ); Tr ( DLC : Jefferson Papers).
I thank you for the perusal of the two letters which are now inclosed. I would also have inclosed Fenno’s two last papers but that mr. Randolph, who has them, has rode out. If he returns in time they shall be sent you by the bearer. They contain nothing material but the Secretary’s progress in paying the national debt, and attacks & defences relating to it. The simple question appears to me to...
I called at Gunston hall. The proprietor just recovering from a dreadful attack of the cholic. He was perfectly communicative, but I could not, in discretion let him talk as much as he was disposed. I proceeded to M. Vernon & had a full, free, & confidential conversation with the President. The particulars shall be communicated when I see you. He declares himself quite undecided about...
In the line I scribbled to you from Georgetown to-day I omitted to inform you that I had unfortunately dropped your letter with some papers of my own in the road between Mount Vernon & Alexandria. Proper measures are taken to recover them. I have reflected on Govr. Lee’s plan of opposing the Federal bank by setting up a state one, and find it not only inadequate, but objectionable highly, &...
I wrote you twice yesterday. This is chiefly to cover the inclosed. On a sum of the poll last night at Annapolis & Baltimore (the only places of polling in Mercer’s district) he was ahead of Thomas only about 25. votes in upwards of 400. The election was then to continue 3. days more. From every thing I can hear it is so doubtful that I would take up 100. to 99 either way. Thomas is a quaker,...
I recd yesterday yours of the 9th. and perceive that the hurry in which I wrote from Bladensbg. has exposed you to an anxiety against which I ought to have guarded by being more explicit. The morning I was at mount Vernon, I took out of my phaeton box (wherein all my papers were) your letter to mr. Carrol (because I was to see him that day) and five letters from individuals to me which I...
I dine at home & alone to-day & Saturday of the present week. I inclose some loose thoughts on the bankrupt bill. Extempore thoughts & doubts on very superficially running over the bkrpt. bill. The British statute excepts expressly farmers, graziers, drovers , as such, tho they buy to sell again. This bill has no such exception. The British adjudications exempt the buyers & sellers of bank...
The idea seems to gain credit that the naval powers combining against France will prohibit supplies even of provisions to that country. Should this be formally notified I should suppose Congress would be called, because it is a justifiable cause of war, & as the Executive cannot decide the question of war on the affirmative side, neither ought it to do so on the negative side, by preventing...