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I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your two Memorials of the 4th. and 6th. instant, which have been duly laid before the President of the United States. You cannot be uninformed of the circumstances which have occasioned the French Squadron now in New York to seek asylum in the ports of the United States. Driven from those where they were on duty by the superiority of the adverse...
As far as the public Gazettes are to be credited, we may presume that war has taken place among several of the Nations of Europe, in which, France, England, Holland and Prussia, are particularly engaged. Disposed as the U.S. are to pursue steadily the ways of Peace, and to remain in Friendship with all Nations, the President has thought it expedient, by Proclamation, of which I enclose you a...
The President of the US. desirous of having done what shall be strictly conformeable to the treaties of the US. and the laws respecting the several representations received from yourself and the Minister Plenipotentiary of Great Britain on the subject of vessels arming or arriving within our ports, and of prizes, has determined to refer the questions arising thereon to persons learned in the...
I have the honor to inform you that the district Attorney of Pennsylvania is this day instructed to take measures for finally settling the cases of the British ship William, captured by the French privateer the Citoyen Genet , and reclaimed as taken within the Jurisdiction of the United States, in which he will proceed as I had the honor of stating to you in my letter of November 10. I have...
A constant course of business has as yet put it out of my power to prepare an answer to your letter of the 5th. instant. In the mean time I have been taking measures to procure copies of the several acts therein complained of, that I might save you the trouble of producing proofs of them. My endeavors have failed in the instances below cited, of which therefore I am constrained to ask you to...
Your several memorials of the 8th instant, have been laid before the President, as had been that of the 2d as soon as received. They have been considered with all the attention and the impartiality which a firm determination could inspire to do what is equal and right between all the belligerent powers. In one of these, you communicate on the information of the british consul at Charleston,...
Your several Memorials of the 8th. instant, have been laid before the President, as had been that of the 2d. as soon as received. They have been considered with all the attention and the impartiality which a firm determination could inspire to do what is equal and right between all the belligerent powers. In one of these, you communicate on the information of the british Consul at Charleston,...
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to Mr. Hammond and incloses him a copy of a commission of a Mr. Moore to be Vice-Consul of Gr. Britain for the state of Rhode-island, on which an Exequatur is asked. As it has been our practice hitherto, where there is a Minister from the same nation, to issue Exequaturs only on his authentication of the Commission, Th: Jefferson takes the liberty of...
Permit me to introduce to you, rather too formally to be sure, as it is an old Acquaintance, my son John Quincy Adams, whom the President has honoured with an Appointment to Holland. His Disposition to Peace is as hearty as that of his Father, and in every Thing that may depend upon him, his Endeavours will not be wanting I presume to preserve it. Mrs Adams joins me in Compliments to Mrs....
It is extremely to be regretted, that while the grounds of difference between our respective countries are under amicable discussion, any circumstances should arise on either side, which might excite questions of still greater delicacy or tend to disturb or imbarrass the course of the discussion. We have no information on our part of the facts which are the subject of your letter of the 5th....
I have this day laid before the President of the United States the enclosed papers, which you put into my hands before your departure for New York, and it is his opinion that if the vessel the Republican, therein mentioned as having been sent into New York, be a prize made on the Citizens of France, she ought not to be detained, but to be ordered to retire as soon as possible: And that if she...
A vessel arrived here from New Providence with certain accounts of a Mr. Bowles being there, having lately arrived from London in company with five Indians, and British goods to amount of upwards thirty thousand pounds sterling, said to be delivered as presents (by Bowles) to the Indians in this quarter from the goverment of Great Britain. That the said Bowles was actually to sail four days...
A constant expectation of carrying into full effect the declaration of the President, against permitting the armament of vessels within the Ports of the united States, to cruize on nations with which they are at Peace, has hitherto prevented my giving you a final answer on the subject of such vessels and their prizes. Measures to this effect are still taking, and particularly for excluding...
In answer to your letter of the 14th. inst. I have the honor to inform you that the French privateers therein mentioned were required to depart to the dominions of their own sovereign, and nothing particularly expressed as to their ulterior movements; that it is expected that the speedy departure of those vessels will obviate the inconveniencies apprehended in your letter; and that it will be...
In the letter which I had the honor of writing you on the 15th. of May, in answer to your several memorials of the 8th. of that month, I mentioned that the President reserved, for further consideration, a part of the one which related to the equipment of two privateers in the port of Charleston. The part alluded to, was that wherein you express your confidence that the Executive Government of...
The bearer hereof, Mr. Louis Osmond , desires me to [convey?] to you the circumstances known to me relative to his emigration to America. Mr. Osmond, about three years ago, arrived in America from France, and brought me letters of recommendation from [several?] persons of rank and character there informing me that his fa[mily?] having from some circumstances lost their fortune there, [he had?]...
Mr. Jefferson presents his respectful compliments to Mr. Hammond: after receiving his letter of this morning he had called on Mr. Hammond to speak with him on the subject of it, according to the desire he had before expressed to him, that when once each party should have explained fully the ground on which they view the matters in difference between them, they might shorten by oral...
Mr. Jefferson presents his compliments to Mr. Hammond and requests for half after three tomorrow his company to a solo dinner, if no engagement shall happen to stand in his way. PrC ( DNA : RG 59, NL ). Not recorded in SJL .
I have the honor of your’s of the 19th. instant. In mine of the same date, I had that of stating to you the matter of fact of the President’s requisition to the privateers in question. The development of it’s terms, and the inferences from them will, it is conceived, be most properly referred to the occasion which shall call for them. Such occasion may never happen; but, if it does, the...
I did not receive till this Morning your letter of the 12th instant. As the Secretary of State is now returned to the seat of Government, it is only necessary for me to refer that letter to him, in order that he may reply to such part of it as requires a reply, which I have accordingly done. With respect I have the honor to be Sir   Your most Obed & humble serv ADf , Connecticut Historical...
The Government here has received complaint that the Snow Suckey, belonging to George Makepeace, a citizen of the United States, with her Cargo, belonging chiefly to Peter Le Maigre, and wholly to citizens of the United States, and not at all of the character of contraband, commanded by Anthony Andaulle a citizen also of the United States, and bound from the Port of Philadelphia to Port au...
Since I had the honor of addressing you on the 1st. instant on the subject of the Republican sent into New York by the Boston frigate as her tender, I have received a letter from the Minister of France alledging that the Boston captured the Republican within the limits of the protection of the US. Should this be agreeable to the fact in your own judgment, I would request her delivery to her...
Th: Jefferson has the honour to inform Mr. Hammond, that on examination of the proceedings of his office he finds the usage to be to produce the original of the Consular commissions to the President: and for this reason that if the office be called on by a court of justice on any question relative to the Consul, a certificate in the nature of an Inspeximus is sent them, which supposes there...
In a letter which I had the honor of addressing you on the 19th. of June last, I asked for information when we might expect an answer to that which I had written you on the 29th. of May was twelvemonth, on the articles still unexecuted of the treaty of peace between the two nations. In your answer of the next day, you were pleased to inform me that you had forwarded the letter of the 29th. of...
I have now the honor to enclose you the copy of a letter from the Attorney General of the United States in the case of Hooper and Pagan, in consequence of your last to me on that subject. It is still to have been wished that no efforts had been spared on the part of Mr. Pagan to bring his case before the Supreme Court of the United States. However supposing the Court of Massachusetts to be the...
Your favor of March 5. has been longer unanswered than consisted with my wishes to forward as much as possible explanations of the several matters it contained. But these matters were very various and the evidence of them not easily to be obtained, even where it could be obtained at all. It has been a work of time and trouble to collect from the different States, all the acts themselves, of...
Th: Jefferson presents his respectful compliments to Mr. Hammond, and seeing that the Governor of Vermont himself has moved in the business on which Mr. Hammond has written, he will write this afternoon more particularly to the governor. Th:J. leaves town tomorrow afternoon. If possible he will have the honor of waiting on Mr. Hammond, being very desirous of speaking with him on Pagan’s...
I have the honor to acknolege the receipt of your letter of yesterday with the papers accompanying it, and will immediately lay them before the President of the U.S. But not being acquainted with the situation of Caldwell’s manor, at which it is said that an officer of Vermont has distrained some cattle and that Capt. Savage rescued a part of them, I shall be glad to be enabled to inform the...
In recalling your attention to the Seventh article of the Definitive Treaty of Peace between the United States of America, and his Britannic majesty, wherein it was stipulated that ‘His Britannic majesty should, with all convenient speed, and without causing any destruction, or carrying away any negroes or other property of the American inhabitants, withdraw all his Armies, garrisons and...
Th: Jefferson presents his respectful compliments to Mr. Hammond: he had not heard of the adjournment of the circuit court at Richmond without deciding the case of Jones v. Walker, and therefore cannot say with certainty why it was not decided. He had been before informed through a private channel that but two of the three judges were arrived in Richmond, and that it would not be decided but...
I have to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 7th. instant, on the subject of the British ship Roehampton, taken and sent into Baltimore by the French privateer the Industry, an armed Schooner of St. Domingo, which is suggested to have augmented her force at Baltimore before the capture. On this circumstance a demand is grounded that the prize she has made shall be restored. Before I...
I received yesterday the representation and requisition which you were pleased to make on the capture of the British ship Grange by the French frigate L’Embuscade within the bay of Delaware, and immediately laid it before the President. The US. being at peace with both parties, will certainly not see with indifference it’s territory or jurisdiction violated by either, and will proceed...
Immediately on the receipt of your letter of March 12th. on the subject of Mr. Pagan, I referred it to the Attorney general of the US. for his opinion. As soon as I receive that opinion from him, I will do myself the honor of addressing you thereon. I am with due respect Sir your very humble servt. PrC ( DLC ); at foot of text: “The Minister Plenipotentiary of G.B.” FC ( Lb in DNA : RG 59, DL ).
I have duly received your favor of to-day on the subject of Mr. Pagan. His case arises on the proceedings of the supreme court of justice of Massachusets, and requires of course to be considered by the Attorney General of the United States, who calls for a sight of the record of those proceedings. I have accordingly written to Massachusets to have a copy of the record of the judiciary...
Your letter of the 23rd. instant, desiring an ascertainment, in the mode pointed out in my letter of Septr. 5. of the losses occasioned by waste, spoliation, and detention, of the Sloop Hope, taken on the 10th. of August by the privateer le Citoyen Genet, brought into this port the 14th. and restored on the 20th. in consequence of the orders of this Government, has been laid before the...
According to your desire I wrote to the Committee of Baltimore to inform me of the passengers to France who ask your passport. The following is an extract from their letter, of Sep. 8. ‘The numbers already entered and for whom a provision has been made at a heavy expence to the French republic and the inhabitants of this town are as follow. In the Marianne, Capt. Ardouin 250. persons. In the...
I received yesterday your favor of the day before, and immediately laid it before the President of the U.S. and I have it in charge from him to express to you the perfect satisfaction which these assurances on the part of your court have given him that Bowles, who is the subject of them, is an unauthorised impostor. The promptitude of their disavowal of what their candour had forbidden him to...
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to Mr. Hammond, who not having been here before on the New Year’s day, Th:J. takes the liberty of informing him that those who chuse to pay visits of compliment to the President to-day are recieved at twelve aclock.—While on this subject he will add that the 4th. of July is another anniversary on which those who chuse it visit the President. Those are the...
Th: Jefferson has the honor to present his respectful compliments to Mr. Hammond, and to apologize for not having sooner answered his note wishing for a conference on the subject of his letter of the 5th. inst. The subject being new, Th:J. could not be assured of expressing to Mr. Hammond, in conversation, sentiments which should be really those of the government until there should have been a...
Your Memorial of the 11th. instant, stating that the British brigantine Catharine has been taken by the French frigate the Embuscade within 2. or 2½miles of the shores of the US. was duly laid before the President, and in consequence thereof the Governor of New York, where the brigantine is understood to be arrived, is desired to take possession of her. It being now supposed that the tribunals...
In consequence of a short absence of the Secretary of State from this city, the prosecution of an inquiry into the affair mentioned in your letter of the 6th instant has been committed to me; and I have it in instruction from the President to communicate to you the result. The facts, as they have appeared upon inquiry, are presented in a report from the Attorney of the district, of which a...
On the receipt of your letter of the 14th. of December I communicated it to the President of the United States, and under the sanction of his authority the principal members of the executive department made it their duty to make known in conversations, generally, the explicit disclaimer, in the name of your court, which you had been pleased to give us, that the Government of Canada had...
I take the liberty of inclosing you an extract of a letter from a respectable character, giving information of a Mr. Bowles lately come from England into the Creek country, endeavouring to excite that nation of Indians to war against the United States and pretending to be employed by the government of England. We have other testimony of these his pretensions and that he carries them much...
I have now the honor to inclose you the answer of the Attorney General to my letter covering yours of Mar. 12. on the case of Hooper and Pagan, wherein he has stated the proceedings of Pagan for obtaining a writ of error from the Supreme court of the US. for revisal of the judgment of the inferior court pronounced against him; and also his opinion on the merits of the question, had the writ of...
I have laid before the President of the United States the letters of Nov. 30. and Dec. 6. with which you honored me, and in consequence thereof, and particularly of that part of your letter of Dec. 6th. where you say that you are fully authorised to enter into a negociation for the purpose of arranging the commercial intercourse between the two countries, I have the honour to inform you that I...
I have to trouble you in the following cases of captures of American vessels by British privateers, and to ask your intervention therein. The first is, that of M. le Maigre, a citizen of this State, on whose behalf I had on a former occasion to apply to you on the capture of the Snow Suckey, his property. He has lately had also a Brig called the Molly commanded by Captain Bernard Razer, laden...
I had the honour to address you a letter on the 29th. of May was twelvemonth on the articles still unexecuted of the treaty of peace between the two nations. The subject was extensive and important, and therefore rendered a certain degree of delay in the reply, to be expected. But it has now become such as naturally to generate disquietude. The interest we have in the Western posts, the blood...
Mr. Jefferson has the honor of presenting his compliments to Mr. Hammond, of expressing his regrets that he happened to be from home when Mr. Hammond did him the honor of calling on him, and was equally unlucky in not finding him at home when he waited on him on Monday. Being informed by Mr. Bond that Mr. Hammond is charged with a public mission to the government of the United States, relative...
I have the honor to inform you that the privateers Petite Democrate and Caramagnole sent into New London as a prize the Brig Nancy of Jamaica: that the Govr. of Connecticut, having possessed himself of the said brig by a party of militia, was ready to deliver her up to her master or owner at the time of her capture, but that no such persons have appeared, and that in this case the Governor...
I have just received your favor of this morning and am authorized to assure you that the denial of asylum in our ports, was not meant to be confined to the Citoyen Genet, but to extend to all vessels armed in our ports. I had no information before of the Anti-George, named in your letter. But if she is in the same predicament, she will be subject to the same rule. I have the honor to be with...