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I have this morning received your manly letter of 25 th Ult.— I had long intended to write you but as you observe avocations have always intervened. Public business my son, must always be done by somebody.— it will be done by somebody or other— If wise men decline it others will not: if honest men refuse it, others will not. A young man should well weigh his plans. Integrity should be...
I received your short Epistle by M r: Thomas at Ipswich, where I was then attending the Court of Common Pleas: and at the same time he gave me very agreeable information respecting your performance at exhibition; which has been confirmed to me from several quarters. From the conversations which have repeatedly passed between us, you will readily imagine how much I was gratified, to hear that...
I have just received your favour of the 22 d: inst t : thanks you know are “the exchequer of the poor.” upon that exchequer of mine you are entitled to bills to a large amount. I assure you I feel the obligation of your attention to my trunk, which has not yet arrived, but which will be very acceptable when it comes. But your Letter has excited my curiosity, and I find myself very much...
I received by the last Post your short favour, inclosing a much longer one to Quincy which I have punctually delivered: I know not whether this will reach you before your departure from Philadelphia; if it does not it can do no harm: and if it does, as you have concluded upon coming this way with the family it may be of some service to me.— You recollect doubtless that while I was in...
I received your favour of the 17 th: inst t: from New-York, and am happy to hear you had got well so far on your journey. I hope you will be equally punctual on your arrival at Philadelphia. I must request your attention to the memorandum, which I left with you last Spring; and that you would not forget to send my segars before the navigation closes for the Season. the numbers of the Gazette...
I received last week your favour of the 17 th: of last month, and found in it none of that tediousness which you seem to apprehend: indeed I suspect your fears were in some measure dictated by your indolence, and that you make them a pretext in your own mind, to relieve you from the tediousness of writing: but this pretence must not serve you: for I can assure you, that your Letters will...
I have been for more than three weeks indebted to you for two very agreeable Letters, which Mr. Otis brought from you. They would not have remained so long unanswered but for a variety of circumstances which have concurred to engross all my time during that period. It is possible that you may have observed in the Centinel about a month since, that a Committee of 21 inhabitants at this Town was...
I believe I am in arrears with you, for two or three Letters, which is owing in some measure to my indolence, but in a greater degree to the stagnation of events worthy of communication— The purpose of my present Letter is to enquire of you respecting a warrant from the Treasury for some money, which it seems must be sent here to be signed by your father before it can be sent back for payment....
I have received your Letter containing the orders upon the branch bank, and also that with the bill of lading of 3 barrels; I ought to have written you this information a post or two ago, but some business, more indolence, and most of all forgetfulness was the occasion of my omission. I suppose you will soon commence Attorney, and I understand you have some thoughts of retiring into one of the...
Your father will be the bearer of this Letter, and probably will find you at Philadelphia, which our late accounts represent as being totally free from the pestilence, which raged with so much violence for two or three months.— Remember however and be cautious— In the midst of the general calamity, for which your friends participate in the general affliction, they recollect with pleasure,...
I received by the last post your favour enclosing a draft upon the branch Bank, for 100 dollars. The political speculations of which your fraternal feelings have formed so favourable a judgment, originated in motives at least as disinterested, as are the common sources of patriotism. That a literary reputation is an object of Ambition to the writer, it would be false and absurd to deny. That...
I received yesterday your very laconic favour enclosing a draft upon the bank for 500 dollars which I shall pay over according to your directions. We are in great apprehension of being forced into a War. The last intelligence we have from the West Indies is that they capture and condemn all our vessels without discrimination— A Man arrived yesterday with an account of more than thirty sail...
M r: Newcomb has executed a power of Attorney, authorising you to receive his interest due. I herewith enclose it.— You mention in your Letter to your mother, that you expect to leave Philadelphia the 28 th: of this month. But not where you purpose to go. I should be glad to hear from you once in a while. I think you are now in my debt upon the score of our correspondence. War—seems to be now...
Col l: Hamilton arrived in Philadelphia, the night before you left it, but from the pressure of business more immediately urgent, was not prepared for me untill last Friday. On that Evening I left the City, in company with Gen l Knox, and arrived here (quite overcome with fatigue, and somewhat unwell of the complaint which you brought from the same place) on Saturday at about 6 in the Evening....
I once more wish you a prosperous Voyage an honourable Conduct and a happy Life. Remember your Characters as Men of Business as well as Men of Virtue, and always depend on the Affection and Friendship of your Father RC ( Adams Papers ); addressed: “My Sons”; internal address: “John Quincy and Thomas Boylston Adams”; endorsed by JQA : “My Father 14. Sept r: 1794. / Rec d: at Boston.” Tr ( Adams...
Well my Dear Son, how did the watery world agree with you? I hope it was propitious to your passage, and that thirty or 40 days, at furthest Landed you safe in a Country, for which I have ever Since my residence in it, entertaind a fondness and partiality. As you are a New Traveller I expect from your pen; many judicious observations, but what will be most valuable to me, will be the News of...
You have lost the Opportunity of sharing in the Glory of some of your Friends in this City, who have been out and returned, from the Campain against the Insurrection in the four Western Counties of Pensilvania. Your Friend Climer lost his Life, and is greatly lamented. ’Squire Cranch as his Father calls him was here Yesterday with M r Greenleaf, whose Agent as well as Lawyer he is to be at the...
Should a vessel cross the Atlantick, and my dear Thomas not find a few lines from his Mother, I know he would feel sadly dissapointed, yet not a Solitary Scrip, has reachd her yet, to assure her, of his, or his Brothers Safety. The arrival of the vessel has been confirmd by a Letter, received in Boston, in replie to one which went in the Alfred, so that my anxiety respecting the Ship was...
When you address me again, let it be by the endearing Epithet of Mother, instead of the formal one Madam; I Should have thought your partiality for your Friends the Quakers would have prevented your substituting any other Epithet. and now having in a few words setled a point respecting titles, a subject which has occupied a great Legislature for many days, and occasiond much warmth and Heat,...
Your Letter of the 19 of October from London gave me great Joy and all your other Friends of whom you have many much Pleasure— And I was again highly delighted to hear from M r Jay that he had Letters from your Brother at Amsterdam the 20 th of Nov r. M r Wilcocks who is kind enough to take Charge of this Letter is probably an Acquaintance of your s : You must take him with you in your Daily...
I did not receive any Letters from You when your Brother wrote last to me the 11 of Nov br . I suppose you felt quite out of Sorts at not having received any Letters from Your Friends here. you must not however judge that your Friends have not written to you this is the fourth Letter which I have written, and your Friend Quincy I trust has written to you. I know he has received several Letters...
Your kind Letters of Nov. 2. and Dec r 20 are before me. You will Soon learn the meaning of the Word Ennui, among others in the French Language, which have no parallel Expression in English. I Suffered more from this Dæmon in Europe than I can express; more for what I know than from all the other Pains of my whole Life. had I not found in Books a relief from it, I should have perished under...
I last Week at Philadelphia rec d your kind Letter of April by Capt n Boadge, and it has been a delicious Morcell to me and to several other of your Friends. As you are in the best Country of Europe for the study of the civil Law, I hope you will embrace the Opportunity of making yourself acquainted with all the best Writers on that divine Science, as my Master Gridley used to call it. The...
This very Day twelve month You lost sight of your native Land. Your Native Land is not I trust the less Dear to you, tho the account I must give you of some of its inhabitants will not tend to heighten your National Pride or vanity. A real American will remain Such under all circumstances, and in all Countries, but an Anglo American or a Frenchified American, is an unnatural Character, and...
I apprehend that your information respecting the time when we are to be ready to depart was not altogether accurate; for although the wind at present would serve us very well, and the weather is remarkably fine, the Pilot will not venture to carry us out, and two of the passengers, have just been dispatched to the Hague to procure passports. The Captain however is so very anxious to get away,...
The letter from Charles enclosed in yours of yesterday, accompanies as he says the bills, which may therefore be expected immediately for acceptance. As they are at thirty days sight, it will perhaps be necessary to pay the money before the close of the year. The sum of f. 7,500. will just about absorb that for which I have a right to draw upon the bankers at Amsterdam, untill the last of...
You were doubtless informed by our friends who favoured me with a visit at Helvoet of my sailing from thence at last. I landed the next day at Margate, and the morning after reached the place from whence I now write you. I found nothing to do; or rather all done. But I still find my self detained here to wait for further orders which I expect daily to arrive M r: Pinckney is expected back in...
I Love to receive a Letter from both Brothers at once, and I suppose each of You like to have a Seperate Letter. I write all my politicks to the Minister and then am as much at a loss, what to write to you, as I Sometimes am, to find conversation for a company of Ladies. I go but little from Home, and many interesting events, pass unnoticed. of Domestick occurrences I believe I wrote you, that...
Your Packet by M r: Clarke at length was delivered me on the 21 st: and your letter of the 11 th: of this month, by M r: Calhoun the day preceding. Quincy’s letter is indeed a valuable one, and contains some opinions which are at once just important, and not sufficiently established in the minds of Americans in general. I would enclose it back to you, but think I may as well be the bearer of...
I believe there have been two or three opportunities of writing to the Hague since I received your favour of the 23 d: ult o: which have escaped me. This circumstance is not to be attributed entirely to indolence or inattention on my part: in fact I have been very unwell, and for the last three weeks have scarcely taken a pen in hand. My previous correspondence from hence I think will bear no...
I never feel so great a propensity to write as when I have just received a Letter. Yours of Nov br 10th reach’d me on the 28 th of Feb’y, and gave me a flow of Spirits which I have not experienced for a long time before. I had been mourning and sighing to hear, from my Dear sons in vain. The Letters by Mr Lamb were lost, together with the vessel captain, and all but one of his Hands and mr...
M r: Clagett has this moment delivered me your favour of the 29 th: ult o: and informs me that he goes again for Holland to-morrow morning. I have therefore only time to tell you that I am still waiting for that permission to return which I have been more than two months in hourly expectation of receiving. My detention here is doubly mortifying from the consideration that as my presence is...
M r Hindman of Maryland has requested a Letter from me, for M r Richard Cook of Anapolis, who will tell you our News. I have read your public Dispatches with great Pleasure. I find your Situation has led you to an Attentive Observation of the Events of the War and the Maneuvres of Politicks and your curious felicity of Expression enables you to represent both to great Advantage. Your Mother...
It is a long time Since I have rec d a Letter from you and it is too long Since I have written to you. I have read your Dispatches as Chargé d’affaires at the Hague with much Satisfaction: But I find the Secretary of the Treasury is anxious to hear from You on the subject of Affairs in Holland which have more immediate Relation to his Office. The House of Representatives of U.S. are engaged in...
I am extreamly sorry to hear that you have been ill of your old Complaint: but was somewhat consoled at the same time by hearing you were better. Exercise of Walking or riding will be your Life in Holland. Our Affairs are assuming a face of good Humour which is very pleasant after so long a storm. We shall have Peace and good Gov t for some Years I hope— I long to learn your Intentions about...
It is a long time Since I have rec d any Letter from you, and the Report that you have had a Return of your Rheumatism has allarmed me— We heard that you were better but should be glad to know the Particulars. I am once more happy at home, and my Farm, by the help of a fine rainy season shines very bright.— I Should be glad to be informed, of your Plans and Views— Whether You mean to return or...
It was no longer ago than Yesterday that I received your kind Letter of the 14. of December last, which arrived, after a long Passage, I Suppose, at Baltimore, and came from thence by the Post which carried them to Cape Cod and then returned them to Quincy. We have been anxious on your Account as We had rec d no Letter except your Letter of Introduction to M r De Persyn, and We heard you had...
A Neighbour of ours Captain Richard Beal is going this week to sail for England, and I do not know a more direct conveyance to you. the Communication between America and Holland is not half so frequent, as with England. The last Letter which I had the pleasure to receive from you, was dated the 1 of December. Your Father has received two from you of a latter Date, but none Since December. From...
There has been an interval of Eight Months Since I received a line from Your Hand. this Suspension of intercourse grows Daily more and more painfull to me as I learnt from your Brother that you had been sick first with a severe attack of the Rhumatism, and after ward with a Billious Remitting fever; I fear that the Climate of Holland is peculirly unfavourable to you, as your constitution is...
Your Letter of June the 29 th was as refreshing to me as cold water to a thirsty Soul. the very superscription gave a flow to my spirits which I had not experienced for many Months before. be assured not one unkind thought ever enterd my mind at not hearing from you. it was anxious Solisitude for Your Health, painfull suspence at what might be the cause of Your long silence. Your Brother had...
I have just received Your Letter, sent by the Gen’ ll Green, Captain Sheldon via RhoadeIsland, dated August 27 th . I believe I have scarcly lost a Letter from You or Your Brother notwithstanding the many hazards and Chances to which they have been liable. accept My thanks for Your last Communications. I rejoice at the return of your Health Strength and spirits, and most sincerely wish that...
I fear to look back to the Date of my last Letter to You, least it should accuse me of omission. There have been but very few opportunities this Severe Winter, of writing to You Rude Boreas laid an embargo, and our harbours have been frozen for six weeks, so that not a vessel could go out, or come in. for about a Week we have had a Thaw. I have received within a fortnight your Letters of...