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The President of the United States has instructed me to communicate, in confidence , to the Senate, the dispatches from Major General Wayne herewith transmitted, dated the 23d of December last, and which were received on the 28th instant. I have the honor to be, / Sir, / with great respect, / Your obedient Servt: DNA : RG 46—Records of the U.S. Senate.
By the direction of the President of the United States, I have the honour to present herewith—No. 1. A Statement of the present military force of the United States; No. 2. A report of the measures which have been pursued to obtain proper sites for Arsenals; & No. 3. A report of the measures which have been taken to replenish the magazines with military stores; No. 4. A report of the measures...
Portland , in the District of Maine .—The works consist of a fort, a citadel, a battery for ten pieces of cannon, an artillery store, a guard house, an air furnace for heating shot, and a covered way from the fort to the battery. The works are substantially executed, excepting the covered way; to complete this, the earth on the spot being of a bad quality, with the necessary supports of stones...
The Senate were pleased, on the 22d. of December, to direct a statement to be laid before them of the military force actually employed against the insurgents in the four Western Counties of Pennsylvania, and an account of the expenditures in that expedition. I have now the honour to inform the Senate, that the expenditures were of various kinds, none of which, except merely for the pay of the...
I have the honor to enclose a report on the memorial and petition of William Somarfall & son & John Price, merchants of Charleston, South Carolina, yesterday referred to me by the Senate; and to be with perfect respect, / Sir, / Your most obedient servant DNA : RG 46—Records of the U.S. Senate.
I have just received your letter of the 29th. ulto. enquiring about your son Thos. B. Adams at the Hague. On the day of the date of your letter I recd. one from him dated the 28th. of May, from which be pleased to receive the following extract, containing all the information I can give in answer to your enquiries, excepting that the latest letter from your eldest son is dated the 22d. of June...
The President set out early this morning for Mount Vernon; and soon after, his address to the people of the United States appeared in Claypoole’s news-paper. Of this public declaration, that he will not be a candidate for the office of President, at the ensuing election, I supposed it would be grateful to you to receive the earliest advice. The sentiments he has expressed on the occasion may...
By the direction of the President of the United States, I have the honor to inclose a report of the Director of the Mint, suggesting the expediency of some alterations in its establishment, to render it less expensive to the public, and more accommodating to depositors. The report is accompanied with statements of the gold, silver, and copper coins issued from the mint from its commencement to...
I inclose the form of the summons by Mr. Jefferson on the former occasion, to the Senators to attend on the 4th of March, and that which would seem to me proper on the present occasion; and by the favour of you to make any alterations that shall appear best; also to fill the blank for the hour of assembling at the Senate Chamber. With great respect / your obt. servt MHi : Adams Papers.
I have recd. a letter of the 6th ult. from Mr. Anspach, stating the necessity of his being furnished with two or three thousand dollars, to pay some arrears due to himself, Mr. Wolfe, Mr. Dill, & a few others who were employed in the late department of the Quarter Master General—that the payment of those arrears, particularly his, Mr. Wolfe’s & Mr. Dill’s will enable them to complete the...
I have this day recd. your letter of the 19th. instant. It is in some sort anticipated by mine of last week. But the inclosed letter to Mr. Peter Anspach is to request him with Mr. Wolfe’s assistance to present you with a statement of the debts intended to have been provided for by the anticipation you mention, & which yet remain unsatisfied. The documents are in his hand. I remarked in my...
Last evening a gentleman called on me to inform me of Mr. Duer’s resignation; and to urge me to apply for the vacant office. Having since reflected on a variety of circumstances which would render the office eligible, I have concluded to make known to you my willingness to take it, if you, who know me perfectly well, think I can give you the aid you would wish for and expect in an assistant....
Conveyances to and from this place rarely offer, which, I suppose, prevented my receiving your favor of May 13th until a few days past. In appointments to public employments, when I had such to make, I am not conscious that personal considerations ever influenced my choice. The same principle determines me to be satisfied, and, if you will allow the expression, to approve of your appointment...
The inclosed letter, I sent at its date from Wyoming by a private hand, in a packet addressed to Mr. Hodgdon to be forwarded to you: but to-day it came to hand, thro’ the post office. I find that Congress have been pleased to grant 40,000 dollars to discharge certain arrears due from my late department. Mr. Anspach has written to me on the subject. He states that the mode of paying the...
I have received and considered your letter of the 23rd instant, proposing that a credit should be given to the Supervisors of the Revenue for the postage of Letters, until their collections should render it convenient to make payment. I shall as you request instruct the Deputy Postmasters, at the places by you enumerated, to open accounts with the respective Supervisors, and to accommodate the...
When I received your letter of the 13th of August, I did not consider it with the attention which would have been necessary if at that time I had attempted to answer the questions you propose. Now it appears to me impossible to do it, with any degree of precision. It then struck me that certain communications to the Society of Agriculture of this city would have furnished the principal...
After much enquiry, I have found a house which would accommodate my numerous family, and at the same time give me office-room. The greatly extended business of the department, I think may be accomplished with the same help which has been used since the time of Mr. Osgoods appointment, to wit, an assistant and clerk. For these, with their necessary writing desks, table, boxes, cases & shelves,...
The Indians of the Five Nations who lately visited Philadelphia, received their invitation from me , in the manner described in the inclosed copy of a letter to the President. Mr. Kirkland, the bearer of my message, received his instructions from the Secretary of War, to whom he from time to time transmitted information of his proceedings. Of this I was ignorant until after the arrival of the...
The manner in which I have been employed to effect the present visit of the Chiefs of the Five Nations, renders me peculiarly interested that the negociations with them should conform with the direct object of the invitation. This object is indelibly impressed on my mind; it having been the main argument offered by me, to convince them of the real friendship of the United States. I feel...
I have just read a passage in your circular letter of June 25th to the Collectors of the Customs, putting on the 12th section of the Post-Office-Law a construction which I conceive to be erroneous & which will materially injure the revenue of the department. I recollect your dropping the same idea transiently when I last saw you. I then searched for but overlooked the clause which showed that...
Since the close of the last War with Great Britain the Mails for Canada, brought by the British Packets to New York have been transmitted to Albany by the carriers of the Mails of the United States; and from Albany by a Courier to Montreal. Mr Lansing the postmaster at Albany, was the agent in this business in behalf of the Deputy postmaster General for Canada. Mr Lansing made some...
I enclose the papers before handed to you respecting Ichabod Grummans claim, and a new and more accurate statement of his income by which it appears that on the principal admitted in his case, he may ask an indemnification of nine hundred & thirty one dollars 78 cents for the loss which he sustained by the sickness which lately prevailed in Philadelphia. I am &c. LC , RG 28, Letter Books,...
General Post Office, March 28, 1794. “I have reviewed my calculations respecting Ichabod Grumman’s claim for an allowance on Account of the loss he sustained in carrying the mail between Philadelphia and New York, by reason of the fatal sickness in the former city, during the last Autumn; and seeing no cause for alteration in the statement, I now request your approbation, in writing , as you...
[ Philadelphia, January 8, 1795. On January 20, 1795, Hamilton wrote to Pickering and referred to “your letter of the 8th. instant.” Letter not found. ]
[ Philadelphia, January 19, 1795. On January 19, 1795, Hamilton wrote to Pickering : “I have recd. your letter of this day.” Letter not found. ]
The interest you take in all public measures of importance, and the peculiar solicitude you must feel at this time of general agitation, when so many are busy apparently to undermine the government which you so effectually laboured to establish, and have so eminently contributed to maintain—induce me, with that sincerity which I trust has ever marked my character, and that frankness which an...
The printer of Mr. Randolph’s vindication advertises that it will be published next Friday. The translation of Fauchet’s letter will be in it. This translation was made by Mr. Taylor at Randolph’s request; but Mr. Taylor, who desired the use of mine, told me that he had made but few variations. Now if I have mistaken the sense in any material passages, it is highly probable that they will be...
The President is anxious to ascertain whether the gentlemen he has thought of for Commissioners under the 6th & 7th articles of the British treaty will accept of those employments. He has concluded to appoint Egbert Benson Esqr. one of the Commissioners for executing the 6th article, relative to the debts owing to British subjects—if he will accept of the employment. He is held in such high...
Mr. Howell, the Commissioner for settling the St. Croix boundary, has been here this week, & started the following questions. 1. “How far will it be proper for Mr. Howell to use his discretion in refusing to draw lots for the third Commissioner, in case the British Commissioner shall persist in proposing a gentleman on his part who may be, in Mr. Howell’s opinion, not an indifferent person?”...
I have just received your letter of the 21st relative to Mr. Pitcairn. As soon as the President had determined to change our Minister at Paris, I considered it not less necessary to make a change in the Consulate; and Mr Pinckney will go thither with the requisite powers on this subject. I have mentioned to him Mr Pitcairn as the gentleman whom he may safely and advantageously employ in the...