You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Pickering, Timothy
  • Period

    • Washington Presidency

Recipient

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 9

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Pickering, Timothy" AND Period="Washington Presidency"
Results 1-50 of 269 sorted by date (ascending)
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
I have recd. a letter of the 6th ult. from Mr. Anspach, stating the necessity of his being furnished with two or three thousand dollars, to pay some arrears due to himself, Mr. Wolfe, Mr. Dill, & a few others who were employed in the late department of the Quarter Master General—that the payment of those arrears, particularly his, Mr. Wolfe’s & Mr. Dill’s will enable them to complete the...
I have this day recd. your letter of the 19th. instant. It is in some sort anticipated by mine of last week. But the inclosed letter to Mr. Peter Anspach is to request him with Mr. Wolfe’s assistance to present you with a statement of the debts intended to have been provided for by the anticipation you mention, & which yet remain unsatisfied. The documents are in his hand. I remarked in my...
Last evening a gentleman called on me to inform me of Mr. Duer’s resignation; and to urge me to apply for the vacant office. Having since reflected on a variety of circumstances which would render the office eligible, I have concluded to make known to you my willingness to take it, if you, who know me perfectly well, think I can give you the aid you would wish for and expect in an assistant....
Conveyances to and from this place rarely offer, which, I suppose, prevented my receiving your favor of May 13th until a few days past. In appointments to public employments, when I had such to make, I am not conscious that personal considerations ever influenced my choice. The same principle determines me to be satisfied, and, if you will allow the expression, to approve of your appointment...
The inclosed letter, I sent at its date from Wyoming by a private hand, in a packet addressed to Mr. Hodgdon to be forwarded to you: but to-day it came to hand, thro’ the post office. I find that Congress have been pleased to grant 40,000 dollars to discharge certain arrears due from my late department. Mr. Anspach has written to me on the subject. He states that the mode of paying the...
Generally speaking, no task could be imposed on me so ungrateful as that of applying for a public office. In the present instance, however, I feel little reluctance in doing it; because I know the application will be duly noticed, and the ultimate decision, whether for or against me, be governed by a just regard to the interests of the United States. By some of my friends I am informed that Mr...
The messenger to the Seneca nation set off this afternoon, with a letter addressed by me to their Sachems Chiefs & Warriors, informing them of my appointment from you to meet them under the authority of the United States; inviting the relations of the deceased Indians to come to Tioga on the 25th of October next; and expressing your desire that the chiefs of the Turtle tribe, & other Great Men...
4 barrels of Country rum 120 gall. @ at 3/. £ 18. 0.0 Provisions for 200 Indians 12 days, including the supplies they must receive when going home, viz.  3200 lbs. of beef @ 3 d. 40. 0.0  32 Cwts flour @ 15/. 24.  .  A silver gorget & other trinkets 10.  .  1 Cwt of tobacco & pipes 2.10.  94.10.0 Provisions & necessaries for T. Pickering, & Colo. Wilson, agent for Pennsylvania, & for the...
In obedience to your orders I held a Conference with the Chiefs &c. of the Seneca nation of Indians at Tioga in this state. About 220 of all ages attended. The day of meeting proposed was the 25th of October: but they did not arrive until the 15th of November. Such delays, I am informed, are common with them; but in the present instance I believe are greatly to be attributed to the...
In obedience to your orders of the 4th of September last, I took the necessary steps for holding a conference with the Logstown Chiefs & warriors of the Seneca Nation of Indians; relative to the murders of two of their people at Pine Creek in Pennsylvania. I wrote to them by the express who at the same time carried a letter from the president of Pennsylvania. In my letter I informed them,...
Having been accidentally detained here longer than I expected, and a little leisure now presenting, I have thought it would not be misapplied in suggesting the means of introducing the art of husbandry, and civilization, among our Indian neighbours. In the treaty with the Creek Indians, I observe provision is made for furnishing them with domestic animals and instruments of husbandry, with a...
I intended to have done myself the honour of waiting on you in person: but a letter may give you less trouble. General Knox informed me that it would be agreeable to you that I should undertake the superintendency of the northern Indians; I mean particularly the Six Nations. I answered, That by the new constitution of Pennsylvania, a Continental appointment was declared to be incompatible with...
As I shall leave town before the papers relative to an intended sale in France of Virginia lands, will be ready to be executed, I have committed the conduct of the business, so far as it respects myself, to my friend Mr. Samuel Hodgdon. He will wait on you with the papers, when completed, to receive such certificate as you shall think proper to give relative to him, Mr. Levi Hollingsworth, and...
(Duplicate) Sir, Philadelphia May 2d 1791. Of the measures pursuing by general Knox, relative to Indian affairs, he doubtless makes to you the necessary communications. In those communications, he may, perhaps, have mentioned my being here, preparatory to my undertaking another mission to the Indians of the Six Nations, for the purpose of confirming the peace and friendship subsisting between...
I have received and considered your letter of the 23rd instant, proposing that a credit should be given to the Supervisors of the Revenue for the postage of Letters, until their collections should render it convenient to make payment. I shall as you request instruct the Deputy Postmasters, at the places by you enumerated, to open accounts with the respective Supervisors, and to accommodate the...
I did myself the honour to call at your house to-day, to speak with you: but you were engaged with Mr Jefferson. And the time not admitting another opportunity (as I wish to leave town on Monday morning) you will permit me to communicate what I had to say, in writing. As you thought it expedient, I went to New York, to converse with Mr Osgood on the business of the post-office. The contracts...
When I received your letter of the 13th of August, I did not consider it with the attention which would have been necessary if at that time I had attempted to answer the questions you propose. Now it appears to me impossible to do it, with any degree of precision. It then struck me that certain communications to the Society of Agriculture of this city would have furnished the principal...
Among the great duties of your high station, the selection of proper characters for public offices is not the least difficult, nor the least important. The multiplicity of applications, the diversity, and sometimes the contrariety of opinions, must often produce painful embarrassments: while a constant aim to provide for the public service, will frequently oblige you to disregard private...
After much enquiry, I have found a house which would accommodate my numerous family, and at the same time give me office-room. The greatly extended business of the department, I think may be accomplished with the same help which has been used since the time of Mr. Osgoods appointment, to wit, an assistant and clerk. For these, with their necessary writing desks, table, boxes, cases & shelves,...
The manner in which I have been employed to effect the present visit of the Chiefs of the Five Nations, renders me peculiarly interested that the negociations with them should conform with the direct object of the invitation. This object is indelibly impressed on my mind; it having been the main argument offered by me, to convince them of the real friendship of the United States. I feel...
The manner in which I have been employed to effect the present visit of the Chiefs of the Five Nations, renders me peculiarly interested that the negociations with them should conform with the direct object of the invitation. This object is indelibly impressed on my mind; it having been the main argument offered by me, to convince them of the real friendship of the United States. I feel...
I inclose the information given me by Colo. Louis. The copy of the letter from his nation bears date the 24th of January. I sent to the war-office for the Original, which I found was dated Feby 24th. Bad travelling at the breaking up of winter and ten days sickness, Louis says have occasion so much delay in his journey. He is anxious to return. In great haste sincerely yours ALS , MHi :...
The Indians of the Five Nations who lately visited Philadelphia, received their invitation from me , in the manner described in the inclosed copy of a letter to the President. Mr. Kirkland, the bearer of my message, received his instructions from the Secretary of War, to whom he from time to time transmitted information of his proceedings. Of this I was ignorant until after the arrival of the...
I have just read a passage in your circular letter of June 25th to the Collectors of the Customs, putting on the 12th section of the Post-Office-Law a construction which I conceive to be erroneous & which will materially injure the revenue of the department. I recollect your dropping the same idea transiently when I last saw you. I then searched for but overlooked the clause which showed that...
Can you inform me of any of the facts or representations communicated to the president relative to news-papers, which led him to notice them in his speech, at the opening of the present session of Congress? It seemed generally to be understood to imply that obstructions to their transmission had arisen from the post office law. Were not the obstructions to the papers which should have passed...
I have received your note of this date . It will certainly be most eligible for the Messenger destined to Georgia to take a passage from New-York in a vessel bound to Savannah or Charleston—perhaps preferably to Charleston, where on his arrival he can find a vessel destined to return to New York by the time he can go to Augusta and get back to Charleston—the trade of Charleston requiring so...
Since the close of the last War with Great Britain the Mails for Canada, brought by the British Packets to New York have been transmitted to Albany by the carriers of the Mails of the United States; and from Albany by a Courier to Montreal. Mr Lansing the postmaster at Albany, was the agent in this business in behalf of the Deputy postmaster General for Canada. Mr Lansing made some...
The inclosed letter from Samuel Freeman Esqr. of Portland I should have presented long ago: but laying it by in my desk very safely, it has been overlooked. Perhaps it may now be of no consequence. Possibly you may know Mr Freeman. He has written to me in consequence of an acquaintance formed by his being the postmaster at Portland. I take him to be of a very respectable character there; and...
Mr: Bradshaw has just returned with an Answer to your letter to the Judge of the district Court of Kentucky. He says he arrived at Lexington, on the 27th: of January. Mr: Innes being from home, Bradshaw was detained until the 8th: of February; and then waited three days for company through the wilderness. The bearer Mr: Bradley will present to you the receipt for the fifty dollars which I...
I am honoured with your letter of yesterday’s date, respecting the delinquency of the post rider between Richmond and Charlottesville. Mr. Davis had some time ago informed me of his irregularities and defects: but soon afterwards wrote me that it appeared he had been so poor as to be unable to provide suitable horses: tho’ he had then accomplished it; and expected such assistance as would...
To remove objections at the auditors office to the settlement of my demand for the repayment of the money paid S. Bradshaw who went express to Kentuckey for the return of the election there of President and Vice-President—be pleased to favour me with a certificate that I employed and paid him at your request. I am respectfully sir Your most obedt. servt. RC ( DLC ); at foot of text: “The...
The intelligence contained in the enclosed copy of a letter from Mr Storer, seemed to be of sufficient consequence to trouble you with; and I should have transmitted it a week ago; but the sickness in my family, and the death of a favourite son, have prevented me. To Governor Simcoe’s public professions of regret &c. at the issue of the treaty, a number of facts may be opposed. These with...
I have been honoured with your letter of the 14th relatively to the fever which has raged so fatally in this city. “Accurate information” of its state it may be impossible to obtain. But I am warranted by Doctor Rush’s opinion, grounded on his own practice and the information of other physicians, that there is an abatement of it by at least one half. For a number of days preceeding the last...
I wrote you by Monday’s post. That afternoon I went to see Mr Peters; and had the pleasure to find that your accommodation and a suitable provision for Congress had engaged the attention of him and divers other citizens of Philadelphia who were scattered in the adjacent country. They have had some consultations on the subject; and will continue them until suitable provision shall be made; of...
Since sealing my letter of this date, my servant has brought me an answer from the Mayor, which I enclose. I am surprized at the number of deaths from Oct. 11th to the 22d. I will continue to advise you of the state of the disease, as often as I can obtain any new information. very respectfully yr most obedt servt ALS , DLC:GW .
I have the pleasure to inform you that the mortal fever which has raged in this city, is prodigiously reduced. A fortnight ago, from 10 to 14 were daily buried in Friends ’ burying ground: but in the last Five days only three in the whole have been buried there. Among the German Lutherans, the reduction appears by the following list— Oct. 22d buried 19   23 —— 10   24 —— 8  
I enclose the papers before handed to you respecting Ichabod Grummans claim, and a new and more accurate statement of his income by which it appears that on the principal admitted in his case, he may ask an indemnification of nine hundred & thirty one dollars 78 cents for the loss which he sustained by the sickness which lately prevailed in Philadelphia. I am &c. LC , RG 28, Letter Books,...
If there be any spare copies of the Census of the Inhabitants of the UStates in the office of the Secretary of State, the postmaster General requests Mr. Jefferson to favour him with one: it being proper to attend to the population of the country in forming an opinion upon applications for new post-roads. RC ( DNA : RG 59, MLR ); endorsed by TJ as received [26] Dec. 1793 and so recorded in SJL .
General Post Office, March 28, 1794. “I have reviewed my calculations respecting Ichabod Grumman’s claim for an allowance on Account of the loss he sustained in carrying the mail between Philadelphia and New York, by reason of the fatal sickness in the former city, during the last Autumn; and seeing no cause for alteration in the statement, I now request your approbation, in writing , as you...
Mr. Miller, the postmaster at Charlottesville, has signified his desire to resign his office; and waits only for the appointment of a Successor. Permit me to ask the favour of you to name a Suitable person, and who will accept the Office. Altho’ the Commission of 20 per Cent may not be a motive with any one, perhaps the privilege of franking his own letters, not exceeding half an ounce in...
I arrived here yesterday. Two or three hours before, two runners arrived from the Indian Council at Buffaloe Creek, with their answer to your invitation to meet me at Kanandaiguay for the purposes therein mentioned. They apologized for the delay in sending their answer, by saying that they had waited the arrival of the Chief (meaning Cornplanter) by whom their former speech on the subject had...
On the 20th I wrote you, that two runners had arrived the day before from Buffaloe Creek with a message urging me to hold the treaty there, that I had answered them that I had no authority to remove the Council fire and that the Treaty must be held at Kanandaigua. That upon receiving this answer, the runners replied that they were directed by the Chiefs to inform me that if I could not go to...
On the 23d Ulto I sent Horatio Jones the Interpreter to Buffaloe Creek to hasten the departure of the Indians and to give them any necessary assistance on the way. I thought also that he would be able to remove any little obstructions which the British Agents might continue to throw in the way. He went directly to their principal village, assembled the Chiefs and delivered my message. The...
Various accidents have retarded the business of the treaty—among others, the death of two Oneida Chiefs—they were very old men. And the appearance of William Johnson, the British interpreter, occasioned the loss of two days. As the Chiefs told me that he had come at their request, it seemed necessary, besides mentioning my orders to suffer no British agent to intrude, to give some reasons for...
The inclosed draught of a letter to the Governors of Virginia, Maryland, South Carolina, Georgia & New York, you will be pleased to lay before the President for his approbation. I wish to send to Virginia & Maryland & New York by this day’s post. yr obt servt ALS , DLC:GW ; LB , DLC:GW . Pickering erroneously wrote 1794 on the ALS . The letter is endorsed as 1795, and the letter-book copy is...
[ Philadelphia, January 8, 1795. On January 20, 1795, Hamilton wrote to Pickering and referred to “your letter of the 8th. instant.” Letter not found. ]
[ Philadelphia, January 19, 1795. On January 19, 1795, Hamilton wrote to Pickering : “I have recd. your letter of this day.” Letter not found. ]
I beg leave to submit to your perusal and orders the inclosed communication from Mr Dixon, and my observations thereon. The other paper is the draught of a message I proposed to send to the Chiefs of the Six Nations to notify them of the ratification of the treaty of Konondaigua. Genl Chapin’s son, who proposes to leave town to-morrow, can carry that message, if approved, and a similar one to...
Be pleased to hand the inclosed papers for the perusal of the President. I will do myself the honour to wait on him respecting them to-day—at any hour the President shall direct, if one will be more convenient to him than another. I am sir, your most obt servt I send the map which you said the President requested with the boundaries of the lands of the Six Nations marked on it. ALS , DLC:GW ;...
The President of the United States has instructed me to communicate, in confidence , to the Senate, the dispatches from Major General Wayne herewith transmitted, dated the 23d of December last, and which were received on the 28th instant. I have the honor to be, / Sir, / with great respect, / Your obedient Servt: DNA : RG 46—Records of the U.S. Senate.