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I cannot easily tell you how much I am pleased & obliged by your friendly Letter of the 4th. Instant:—were I to pursue my Inclinations, I should without Hesitation accept your kind Invitation—but our Inclinations even in things innocent must not always be gratified. my Visits to Philadelphia have ceased to be occasional, or I should certainly avail myself of those opportunities which your...
A weeks Absence on a Visit to my friends at Rye, from whence I returned last Evening, prevented my having ‘till then, the Pleasure of recieving your very obliging Letter of the 20 Decr.— For the Invitation with which you honor me, be pleased to accept my cordial acknowledgements—It is conveyed in Terms which enhance the compliment, & I accept it with that Satisfaction which which Politeness...
From the Day of my appointment to this mission, my Attention has been much withdrawn from my friends, and confined to the Business which brought me here; & which has at last been terminated by a Treaty. In future I shall have more Leisure to attend to my Friends, and to my own affairs— Both your sons arrived here in good Health. I wrote to my friend John lately, but as yet have not had a...
Docr. Edwards of Philada. will be so obliging as to take charge of this Letter. I regret that he & Mrs. Edwards leave this peace so soon—. You will find him a Gentleman of extensive Information.—He has visited the greater part of this Kingdom, and paid particular attention to the Husbandry of it.—Permit me to introduce him to You. I have heard, and wish it may be true, that your Son is...
In Compliance with the Request of Sir John Sinclair I have the Pleasure of transmitting to you herewith enclosed a Book which I recd. from him two Days ago. As it is now probable that Col. Smith will meet with a greater number of opportunities of sending it than will occur to me, I shall take the Liberty of committing it to his care— Be pleased to present Mrs. Jay & my best Compts. to Mrs....
I was this morning favored with your obliging Letter of the 31 ult.—D’Ivernois is very industrious.—I hear no more of his plan of transplanting the University of Geneva into the united States. He is a sensible diligent man, and I suspect that his Correspondence with Mr Gallatin has done no Harm— It gives me pleasure to find that in your opinion no great mischief will be done by the combustable...
I wrote you a few Lines last week—This Morning I was favored with two Letters from your Son of the 14 & 20th. of This Month—Parents are gratified by hearing of or from Their children—The former Letter was Dated at The Hague—The latter at amsterdam—He had been recd. and acknowledged by The States General, and on the 14th had “a gracious audience of The Stadtholder.”—In his last Letter there is...
I have this Moment afternoon recd. the Letter wh. you did me the Honor to write on the 21 Inst— by & by which I am informed that the Trustees of the sinking fund are being equally divided in opinion respecting the Construction of their authority under the Act making Provision for the Reduction of the public Debt, my attendance had become necessary— [ crossed out: On considering the Act in...
The Chief Justice of the United States, presents his compliments to the Attorney General, and requests the favor of him to lay before the Board of trustees, the opinion herewith enclosed, on the question stated in their act of the 26th instant; a copy of which the Chief Justice yesterday received, enclosed in the letter which the Attorney General did him the honor to write on the 29th instant....
I thank you for the printed paper you sent me, and for your Letter by Monsr. Cadignan. On maturely considering the latter I took an opportunity in an informal conversation with Ld. Grenville to communicate it to him. Still I am unable to say any thing decisive relative to the objects of my mission—appearances continue to be singularly favorable; but appearances merit only a certain degree of...
I am happy to find by a New York paper, that the Result of the late Inquiry into your official Conduct is perfectly consistant with the Expectations of your Friends. It is there represented as being voluminous, and in a variety of Respects interesting. Be so good as to send me a copy. I wrote to you lately a confidential Letter, under Cover to the President. My Dispatches to Mr Randolph were...
I send you Copies of a Letter of 3 Augt. from Jacob Cuyler, and of my answer of this Date. It is natural for men circumstanced as he is, to be anxious; and as adversity too often begets neglect, marks of attention are doubly acceptable to men in his Situation. I fear you will find it difficult to do much for his Son. A little will to him be much. At any Rate write to him, and let him percieve...
On Monday the 17th. inst. I set out for Sussex in New Jersey with design after dispatching some private business I had there to proceed from thence on my Circuit. On the 19th. I found myself with a slight inflamation on one eye & some flying Rheumatic pains, to which not suspecting any thing serious I paid little attention. By the 25th. my Eyes were so much inflamed that it was with difficulty...
My Task is done—whether Finis coronat opus, the President Senate and Public will decide. This Letter goes by the Packet, and the Treaty with it. Some parts of it require Elucidation to common Readers. I have not Time for comments. Lord Grenville is anxious to dismiss the Packet. If this Treaty fails, I dispair of another. If satisfactory, care should be taken that public opinion be not misled...
New York, December 21, 1790. Recommends John McComb Jr. as “an intelligent sober & industrious young Mechanic.” LS , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. McComb was the son of a prominent New York architect and builder. The younger McComb became his father’s assistant in 1783 and began his own career as a builder in 1790.
[ New York, November 14, 1791. On December 5, 1791, Hamilton wrote to Jay : “Your letter of the 14th of November duly came to hand.” Letter not found. ]
The bearer will herewith deliver to you a Book of accounts transmitted to me by Mr. Jefferson, and which in my opinion should be deposited in your office. With great esteem and regard &c. LC , Papers of the Continental Congress, National Archives. An asterisk was placed at this point and the words “of Silas Deane” inserted as a footnote. Deane was one of the congressional agents sent to France...
Mr King & I have written this Day to you & General Knox. To that Letter and its Enclosures I refer you. All Men are under obligations to support the Cause of Truth. I presume therefore that the President will permit you to use all the Evidence of the tract in Question, which may be in his Possession or power, and consequently give you access to such Documents as may perhaps be in the office of...
There is something very pleasant in the Reflection that while war discord and oppression triump in so many parts of Europe, their Domination does not extend to our Country. I sometimes flatter myself that Providence in Compassion to the afflicted in these countries, will continue to leave america in a proper state to be an azylum to them. Among those who have suffered severely from these...
New York, December 22, 1790. Recommends that Matthew Clarkson be appointed an inspector of the revenue. ADf , Columbia University Libraries. Clarkson, a resident of New York City, was a regent of the University of the State of New York and a member of the New York Assembly.
On Saturday week last I arrived at Pha. and very early the next monday morning set out in the Stage for this place. I recollected your Deed, but as Mr Iredell came to Pha. with me, and could take the acknowledgmt. I am persuaded you will excuse my passing on without waiting for that Business. The G. Jury at Richmd. requested a Copy of the Charge, the Burden of which was neutrality , and...
On my Return this Evening from Rye, I found your Letter of the 18 Inst: at my House. It is not difficult to perceive that your Situation is unpleasant; and it is easy to predict that your Enemies will endeavour to render it still more so. The Thorns they strew in your way, will (if you please) hereafter blossom, and furnish Garlands to decorate your administration. Resolve not to be driven...
I have conferred with Mr King on the Subject of your Letter of the 3d. Inst. We concur in opinion that neither a Proclamation nor a particular charge by the court to the G. Jury, would be adviseable at present. To us it appears more prudent that this Business be opened by the Presidts. Speech at the ensuing Session of congress—their address will manifest the sense of the House, & both together...
I had last week the Pleasure of recieving from you a few Lines by Mr. Blaney. You will recieve this Letter by the Hands of Mr. Morris. He will also be the Bearer of my Dispatches to Mr. Randolph. They will be voluminous, particular, and in many Respects interesting. It should not be forgotten that there is Irritation here, as well as in America, and that our party Processions, Toasts;...
By the post I recd. this afternoon Letters from the Vice Presidt. & Atty. Genl. calling me to the Board of Trustees. My answers to both are necessarily very concise, having been engag’d by Company, and now being pressed for Time, they are enclosed. I regard my Duty to attend the Courts as being in point of legal Obligation primary , and to attend the Trustees as secondary —and yet I can...
On returning from Exeter the Evening before the last, I had the pleasure of recg your Letter of the 13th. Instant with the two Copies mentioned in it. Having no apprehension of such Measures, what was to be done? appeared to me to be a Question of some Difficulty as well as Importance. To treat them as very important might render them more so than I think they are. The Author of McFingall...
In pursuance of a concurrent Resolution of the two Houses of the Legislature of the third and fourth instant I desire You as a Counsellor at Law to defend in behalf of this State a certain Suit brought against Lewis Cornwall by or in behalf of Alexander Colden for the Recovery of a Farm sold to the said Lewis by the Commissioners of Forfeitures for the Southern District. You will herewith...
I have now the honor of transmitting to you herewith enclosed the extracts requested in your letter to me of the 2d. November last, and am with great respect and esteem &c. LC , Papers of the Continental Congress, National Archives. At the bottom of this letter is the following: “List of papers mentioned in, and transmitted with the aforegoing letter. No. 1. Abstracts and Extracts from the...
Your Letters of the 9th. Inst. were this Day delivered to me, as I was preparing to go out of town. The Subject of them is important. I have not Time to judge decidedly on some of the points. The enclosed will shew what my present Ideas of a proclamation are—it is hastily drawn—it says nothing of Treaties—it speaks of neutrality, but avoids the Expression because in this country often...
[ New York, December 16, 1792. On December 18, 1792, Hamilton wrote to Jay : “Your favours of the 26 of November & 16 instant have duly come to hand.” Letter of December 16 not found. ]
You will recieve herewith enclosed a Publication by Mr Genet denying his having declared that he wd. appeal from the President to the People —a publication by us that we would shortly proceed to state the Evidence and Circumstances relative to that Transaction, and also our manuscript address to the public containing such Statemt. We think it more expedient as well as more delicate with...
[ New York, November 26, 1792. On December 18, 1792, Hamilton wrote to Jay : “Your favours of the 26 of November & 16 instant have duly come to hand.” Letter of November 26 not found. ]
[ New York, July 8, 1791. Letter not found. ] “List of Letters from Mr. Jay …” to H, Columbia University Libraries.
I this Day received the enclosed from the Post Office. It is the only Letter that I have received from Mr. Chiappe since I left the Office for foreign Affairs; and as it belongs to that Department I take the earliest Opportunity of transmitting it to you.—I have the Honor to be with great Respect & Esteem Dear Sir your most obt. & hble. servt. RC ( DNA : RG 59, MLR ); endorsed by TJ as...
Two days ago I received from Sir John Sinclair the Book herewith enclosed, which he presents to you and requests me to forward. As its Size forbids its being sent by the post, and there is little Probability of my soon meeting with other opportunities to Virginia, I think it best to forward it to Pha. and beg the favor of Mr. Randolph to convey it to You. I have the Honor to be with great...
I have at length, my dear Sir, the pleasure of informing you (tho’ not officially) that you have Leave to return, and that Mr. Short is appointed to take charge of the public affairs during your absence. From the Time that your Letter of the 19th. November last was received, Vizt. 10th. February, to the Time that our former Government gave place to the present one, there was not a single Day...
It gives me great Pleasure to address a Letter to you in our own country. Being informed of your having sailed, the Storm a few weeks ago rendered us apprehensive that you might be at least embarrassed on the coast.—I congratulate you very sincerely on your arrival, and join in the general wish that you may consent to remain among us, in the Station to which during your absence and without...
A few days since I received a Letter from Mr. Jefferson, dated at Cowes in the Isle of Wight the 17th. October last, in which he mentioned that he expected to sail from that Place the next Day in a Vessel bound to the Chesapeake, and enclosed a Bill of Lading, a Copy of which I have the Pleasure of herewith sending to you. In case the Packages mentioned in the said Bill of Lading, arrive...
When you shall have received my letter enclosing copies of my Representation to Lord Grenville on the subject of Captures, and of his Answer; and a subsequent Letter enclosing a Copy of the order of Council, respecting Appeals and Claims; you will perceive that they who wish to prosecute either, should without Delay appoint Agents here to manage their Business; and to whom I may deliver such...
I have received the Letter you did me the honor to write on the 9th June, enclosing the Case of the Snow Sukey, and of the Brigantine Maria. That letter begins thus “Since writing of my Letter yesterday, I have received” &c. That letter has never come to my hands. A few days ago I was favored with yours of the 9th July, on the subject of the american Vessel carried into Bermuda, and on Board...
I have the Honor of transmitting to you herewith enclosed, a Packet which I received last Evening from Ab. Ogden Esqr. the Attorney of the united States for New Jersey District. It contains three papers. (1)A Letter from Mr Ogden to me, mentioning the apprehension of a Doctr Freeman, on a charge of forgery &ca and his offer of giving Evidence against others, on an assurance of Pardon. (2)...
apprehensive that my Letter to you (herewith enclosed) is not exactly such an one, as the Gentleman mentioned in it, may perhaps wish and expect it to be, I think it adviseable to send him a copy of it: and that you may have the more perfect and accurate Information, I enclose a copy of my Letter to him. I have lately received much Intelligence from several Quarters—some allowances are to be...
In a Packet sent last Week to Mr Randolph, was enclosed directed to You a Book which the author, a Mr Miles of this City, requested me to forward to You. I was then so pressed for Time as not to have Leisure to write to you. You will receive herewith enclosed a Note or Memoir which Messrs Lameth and Duport have given me for the purpose of laying it before you. These Gentlemen express an...
You can have very little Time for private Letters, and therefore I am the more obliged by the one you honored me with on the 31 of last month. I was not without apprehensions that on Enquiry it might not appear adviseable to gratify Mr Pickman’s wishes; for altho’ Integrity and amiable manners are great, yet they are not the only Qualifications for office. Your answer to the Call for Papers,...
I have been honored with your’s of the 5th of September. Want of Liesure constrains me to be concise. I am authorized by Lord Grenville to assure you in the most explicit Terms, that no Instructions to stimulate or promote Hostilities by the Indians against the united States have been sent to the Kings officers in Canada. I am preparing an official Representation to him on this Subject, and he...
private Since mine to you of Yesterday I have occasionally turned my Thoughts to the Subject of it. I presume that the Treaty is ratified agreable to the advice of the Senate—and that if Great Britain consents to the Suspension of the 12 art: (which I believe will be the Case) the Treaty will thereupon be ratified on her part and become final. of Consequence that the modification contemplated...
Mr Jay has the honor of informing the President of the United States, that yesterday afternoon he received a letter from Sir John Temple in the following words, vizt “New York 12th of October 1789, Sir. I beg leave to submit in the most respectful manner, the enclosed memorial to the consideration of the Government of the United States. The memorialist informs me he hath in his possession all...
A Letter which I wrote to you on the 29 Octr last contained the following Paragraph vizt. “I am authorized by Lord Grenville to assure you in the most explicit Terms, that no Instructions to stimulate or promote Hostilities by the Indians against the United States, have been sent to the Kings officers in Canada—I am preparing an official Representation to him on this Subject, and he will give...
The enclosed contains my Resignation of the office of chief Justice —I cannot quit it, without again expressing to You my acknowledgments for the Honor you conferred upon me by that appointment; and for the repeated marks of confidence & attention for which I am indebted to You. It gives me pleasure to recollect and reflect on these circumstances—to endulge the most sincere wishes for your...
When Mr Drayton of Charleston was here last Summer he told me that the true nankeen Cotton was in So. Carolina. It appeared to me to be a valuable acquisition, and I suggested to him the Expediency of planting it always at so great a Distance from other Cotton, as to avoid the Influence which many plants of the same kind, tho’ of different Species have on each other, when very contiguous....