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I Yesterday recd Information that Col. Walker the naval officer for New York, has resigned; and am requested to mention Mr Henry Remson, the Son of the late Mr Henry Remson of that city, as a proper Person to succeed him. I am apprized of the Delicacy of such Recommendations—they too often require a Degree of caution and Reserve, not easy to observe or express with Precision—on this occasion I...
It occurs to me that it may not be perfectly prudent to say that we are never to expect Favors from a nation, for that assertion seems to imply that nations always are , or always ought to be moved only by interested motives. It is true that disinterested Favors are so rare, that on that account they are not to be expected between nations; and if that sentiment turned on that Reason vizt their...
You can have very little Time for private Letters, and therefore I am the more obliged by the one you honored me with on the 31 of last month. I was not without apprehensions that on Enquiry it might not appear adviseable to gratify Mr Pickman’s wishes; for altho’ Integrity and amiable manners are great, yet they are not the only Qualifications for office. Your answer to the Call for Papers,...
Govr Jay presents his respectful Compliments to the president of the United States, & takes the Liberty of sending the enclosed Copy of a Letter which he this Day recd from Mr S. Bayard. AL , DLC:GW . In his letter from London of 6 Jan., Samuel Bayard informed Jay “of the favourable disposition which has lately been evinced both in Court of appeals and of admiralty in cases where our citizens...
In pursuance of a concurrent Resolution of the two Houses of the Legislature of the third and fourth instant I desire You as a Counsellor at Law to defend in behalf of this State a certain Suit brought against Lewis Cornwall by or in behalf of Alexander Colden for the Recovery of a Farm sold to the said Lewis by the Commissioners of Forfeitures for the Southern District. You will herewith...
I was this morning favored with your obliging Letter of the 31 ult.—D’Ivernois is very industrious.—I hear no more of his plan of transplanting the University of Geneva into the united States. He is a sensible diligent man, and I suspect that his Correspondence with Mr Gallatin has done no Harm— It gives me pleasure to find that in your opinion no great mischief will be done by the combustable...
the British Ratification of the Treaty not having arrived and consequently the Time for appointing the Commissioners mentioned in it not being come, I have thus long postponed replying to yours of the 21 of last month. It certainly is important that the Commissioners relative to the Debts, and also the captures, be men the best qualified for those places. Probably it would be adviseable to...
apprehensive that my Letter to you (herewith enclosed) is not exactly such an one, as the Gentleman mentioned in it, may perhaps wish and expect it to be, I think it adviseable to send him a copy of it: and that you may have the more perfect and accurate Information, I enclose a copy of my Letter to him. I have lately received much Intelligence from several Quarters—some allowances are to be...
private Since mine to you of Yesterday I have occasionally turned my Thoughts to the Subject of it. I presume that the Treaty is ratified agreable to the advice of the Senate—and that if Great Britain consents to the Suspension of the 12 art: (which I believe will be the Case) the Treaty will thereupon be ratified on her part and become final. of Consequence that the modification contemplated...
private I have been honored with yours of the 31 of last month. the article in the Treaty to which you allude vizt the last was proposed by me to Lord Grenville, because it seemed probable that when the Treaty should for some time have gone into operation, Defects might become manifest, and further arrangements become desireable which had not occurred to either of us. because no plan of an...